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Thread: Best practise and the law

  1. #1

    Best practise and the law

    OK, heres a question.. Ive had this argument raised to me and although i know the practical and best practise answer, does anyone know the LEGAL answer.

    Regarding shooting multiple deer from the same area at the same time, best practise would state that the carcasses should have minimum contact with each other for transit back to storage/larder etc. What do you define and 'minimum contact' and also this is impractical if your culling say 3-6 fallow deer and you have a pickup truck. IF i have to move say 3 carcasses in a pickup only a short distance and the carcasses are touching, is this legal if the carcasses are to go into the food chain? (All carcasses would have had external checks completed and NOT gralloched). The transit would be less than 30 minutes in an open pickup..)

    On the above scenario, if i have a meat handling qualification but not DSC2, can i be prosecuted? ie if i havent had proper training? Does the onus change once you complete DSC2?

    Its not me in this situation but i dont know the law well enough to defend the DSC2.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by flyingfisherman View Post
    OK, heres a question.. Ive had this argument raised to me and although i know the practical and best practise answer, does anyone know the LEGAL answer.

    Regarding shooting multiple deer from the same area at the same time, best practise would state that the carcasses should have minimum contact with each other for transit back to storage/larder etc. What do you define and 'minimum contact' and also this is impractical if your culling say 3-6 fallow deer and you have a pickup truck. IF i have to move say 3 carcasses in a pickup only a short distance and the carcasses are touching, is this legal if the carcasses are to go into the food chain? (All carcasses would have had external checks completed and NOT gralloched). The transit would be less than 30 minutes in an open pickup..)

    On the above scenario, if i have a meat handling qualification but not DSC2, can i be prosecuted? ie if i havent had proper training? Does the onus change once you complete DSC2?

    Its not me in this situation but i dont know the law well enough to defend the DSC2.
    If they are not gralloched then you aren't really cross contaminating are you? As long as they are not covering each other in blood or sitting in pools of different blood then I can see no problem really.
    Deer touch each other in the wild I'm sure!
    DSC 2 bears no relevance to the law either. It is the large game handling qualification from DSC 1 (or similar) which is required for the declaration by the trained person.
    I can't see you being prosecuted on what you have just said.
    It is good to see someone showing concern for putting quality products into the food chain though!
    MS

  3. #3
    Iv'e sat in / on / amongst, multiple green gralloched passengers...... with quite a bit of claret running about in the loadbed,........... nothing complained about on fc ground.
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  4. #4
    Stupid question find a better script ,follow your own thoughts on something like this ,be practical if they've got to lie on to of each other that how it's got to be .

    Right here's one to answer on cross contamination, since your on that track ,what happens when you drag a stag off the hill by a rope , another what happens when you put a stag /hind over the saddle on a pony ,there's two examples on cross contamination so what would you rather have a few beasts laying on top of each other or drag it three miles over a peat bog.

    It all comes down to being practical nothing more or less .

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by widows son View Post
    It all comes down to being practical nothing more or less .
    I think 'practical' is a good word.
    Because we shoot dirty animals in dirty places, we can never perform 'perfect practice', so we do the 'best practice' we can which is whatever is the most practical to suit the situation. Most of the time this will produce a carcass that is fit to enter the food chain. Sometimes it won't, and this is when you need to know the difference!
    There are no graphs or mathematical formula's to help you decide where the line is on this one either, but there is a guide. It comes in the form of good old fashioned 'practical' common sense.
    Sadly, common sense can't be bought or taught, and it seems to be in short supply these days amongst the decision makers in our lives.
    It should be obvious whether or not an animal is fit to go into the food chain or not! Would you eat something maybe as much as two weeks later that is covered in mud, stomach contents, effluent, chemicals or whatever it may be contaminated with? Of course you wouldn't, so why try and palm it off to somebody else?

    What really annoys me though is that it doesn't seem to happen at all stages.
    I take great pride in my carcasses and do my utmost to ensure they leave me in the best possible condition. Imagine my horror when a posh looking game dealer van pulls up and throws my immaculate chilled bodies on top of a huge pile of others, some of which are clearly still warm and dripping blood.
    We can only do our 'practical' best!
    MS

  6. #6
    Ok thanks for replies, my thoughts too.. But MS, as you say, your carcass is tagged with your name an number, what's to stop that carcass being contaminated by something once it's left your larder, your still responsible for it...? What do you think would happen if that carcass went in with some warm
    Ones, got warm and the meat made
    Someone I'll, how do you prove it wasn't your fault?! I suppose what I'm asking is how can you protect yourself from a liability POV?

  7. #7
    I suppose what I'm asking is how can you protect yourself from a liability POV?

    eat them yourself

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by flyingfisherman View Post
    Ok thanks for replies, my thoughts too.. But MS, as you say, your carcass is tagged with your name an number, what's to stop that carcass being contaminated by something once it's left your larder, your still responsible for it...? What do you think would happen if that carcass went in with some warm
    Ones, got warm and the meat made
    Someone I'll, how do you prove it wasn't your fault?! I suppose what I'm asking is how can you protect yourself from a liability POV?
    You make a good and valid point, and this is the reason why it annoys me to see it happen. As you say your name is on the list, but it will be the preceeding stage they will investigate first if someone falls ill. The best way to protect yourself, I believe, is to register yourself with the local authorities as a 'Food Business'. You will then be subject to an inspection every 2 years which will ensure, and record that you are operating in the correct manner. You can then argue that the carcass was fine when it left you as all your procedures are good and have been assessed as such, and therefore it has been mistreated further down the food chain. I think it would be very difficult for them to pin any blame on you then unless they have proof otherwise.
    Let's hope it never happens!
    MS

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by flyingfisherman View Post
    Ok thanks for replies, my thoughts too.. But MS, as you say, your carcass is tagged with your name an number, what's to stop that carcass being contaminated by something once it's left your larder, your still responsible for it...? What do you think would happen if that carcass went in with some warm
    Ones, got warm and the meat made
    Someone I'll, how do you prove it wasn't your fault?! I suppose what I'm asking is how can you protect yourself from a liability POV?
    You'll probably find that none of the other carcasses in the van are tagged and he is going to use your ID number for them all anyway! JC

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by flyingfisherman View Post
    Ok thanks for replies, my thoughts too.. But MS, as you say, your carcass is tagged with your name an number, what's to stop that carcass being contaminated by something once it's left your larder, your still responsible for it...? What do you think would happen if that carcass went in with some warm
    Ones, got warm and the meat made
    Someone I'll, how do you prove it wasn't your fault?! I suppose what I'm asking is how can you protect yourself from a liability POV?

    Carry out your own procedures to whatever standards/best practice is in place. Why not get whoever you pass/sell them onto to sign that they have been received in good condition?

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