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Thread: Apples

  1. #1

    Apples

    I have barrow loads of windfall cooking apples (and a few eaters) which I am not gonig to use for anything. A few years ago I droped them in one of the woods for the deer etc to eat but nothing seemed to. I have been told that I should have squashed them (driven over them to allow the juices out) and then they would have been eaten.

    If we get some cold weather again this year I would like to try to use these up on the deer at home. Have any of you tried apples and am I wasting my time.

    We are talking Roe deer in Wiltshire here, small cover belts, large fields. I am not looking to ambush the deer as I very rearly shoot them here it is just nice to see them from the house (sad I know). It might also stop them eating from my hoppers but I doubt it.

    Any ideas would be welcome.

  2. #2
    I make cider and run my apples through a crysher and then make a cheese with straw and apple pulp which I then squash the juice out of, the resulting dry pulp or pomace is an excellent feed for lots of wild animals including the local roe population. Bit of a process for you I realise but it would indicate that crushed apples will be eaten.

  3. #3
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    I prefer the cider plan myself. I'll have to get round to making a press one of these days.

  4. #4
    We tried cider apple pulp on our shoot, it didn't work. It just slowly rotted away, the pheasants, roe and muntjac did not touch it. I have been told before, and I believe someone wrote it on a thread on here somwhere, that if you ferment the pulp and then put it out, it works well. I will be able to tell you after my large plastic screw-topped drum full of various apples stops "working" and I put it out for the deer to try!

    ft
    Blindness to suffering is an inherent consequence of natural selection. Nature is neither kind nor cruel but fiercely indifferent.

  5. #5
    We have more apples than we can use this year in the garden so I have been chucking them over the fence for the deer to eat. As soon as one realises what's going on they all come thundering across and hoover them up, cooking apples included. Maybe those of you who put them out to attract wild deer have just been unlucky that they haven't found them. My deer will eat almost anything chucked over from the garden, I think mostly they just love variety. Although they never go short of food they do not have the selection that wild deer do.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by cyberstag View Post
    We have more apples than we can use this year in the garden so I have been chucking them over the fence for the deer to eat. As soon as one realises what's going on they all come thundering across and hoover them up, cooking apples included. Maybe those of you who put them out to attract wild deer have just been unlucky that they haven't found them. My deer will eat almost anything chucked over from the garden, I think mostly they just love variety. Although they never go short of food they do not have the selection that wild deer do.
    The roe deer from our local wood love the crab apples that are planted locally, there are always slots and crotties under the trees down by the river. Perhaps it's only when they are brown and pulped they don't like them?

    ft
    Blindness to suffering is an inherent consequence of natural selection. Nature is neither kind nor cruel but fiercely indifferent.

  7. #7
    We feed deer on apples, they love them.. Its hilarious to watch the fallow rolling them around in their mouths slobbering everywhere!

  8. #8
    on my way to work i see four roe in a ploughed field all gathered round the edge of this field. there is an apple tree with lots of windfall apples there is nothing else for them to eat so i just thaught they are eating the apples ,wayne

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