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Thread: Shooting this years fawns/calves.

  1. #1

    Shooting this years fawns/calves.

    I had a conversation across a fence with a fellow stalker and he said ' I only shoot the doe, I don't like shooting youngsters'.
    I personally shoot does and attendant young of the year. I have been told before as a guest that young of the year are sexless and to make the best job I can of culling each unit rather than leaving young deer to face winter without a mentor.
    I appreciate that in late doe season the growth may be adequate for young to survive in some areas but in others we had deep snow till mid April and no growth till mid May last year.
    What is your attitude to young of the year and does it change as the season draws to an end?

  2. #2
    I shoot ALL calves if I shoot the mother. It makes for a stronger healthier herd.

    In my experience orphaned calves rarely make a good mature animals as they havent had the best starts to life.
    There is a place on this planet for all of God's creatures, right next to my tatties and gravy!!!

  3. #3
    Like Dan I shoot all calves if I have shot the mother, also with Roe will also sometimes take one of a pair of twins
    leaving the mother with one, especially if one of the twins appears to by doing less well than the other.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gliballs View Post
    I shoot ALL calves if I shoot the mother. It makes for a stronger healthier herd.

    In my experience orphaned calves rarely make a good mature animals as they havent had the best starts to life.
    My stalking never seems to be so straightforward ALL calves do not stand with there mother to be shot after her

  5. #5
    We dont always pick them up on the day but generally run into them towards the end of the season as orphan calves usually end up in the bottom of the glen.

    If we have lost a few calves in the same glen they often gang up together as the weather gets worse.
    There is a place on this planet for all of God's creatures, right next to my tatties and gravy!!!

  6. #6
    I agree with Dan. On the high hill I believe very few orphan calves would survive the winter on thier own. As he said they tend to get themselves into groups and a pitiful sight they sometimes make. I shoot out these groups whenever I see them . Often I find them thin and struggling. They appear on my land from higher up as the season ends. I would always shoot the calf with her dam if at all possible.
    David

  7. #7
    I agree with Dan. Some years ago about this time of year in a quiet spot I came upon a doe and 2 fawns. I shot the doe and the doe fawn. The buck fawn watched and did not leave, but I didn't shoot. This was a mistake. Some months later the boss came along and shot a very motheaten and bedraggled buck fawn. Without the guidance of his mother the buck fawn had lived but not prospered. The fawns are looked after and learn from their mother up until the day she kicks them out. I recently watched a threesome stood in a 'T' formation all grooming each other.

    Regards JCS

  8. #8
    As a sheep farmer I've seen the effects of 'lack of maternal guidance' on orphaned lambs. They seldom thrive as well as a lamb that had the full education from their mothers. They are often found on the margins of the flock and in nature I suppose they would fall prey to predators first without the skills passed on from their mothers.

  9. #9
    With roe I will also sometimes take one of a pair of twins leaving the mother with one to nurture through the winter as it keeps her busy and will usually stays on the shooting ground but if I shoot both then I have been taught to always shoot the young one first which does not make it easy to get the mother as she is often off like the proverbial.
    Good management always comes before the sport side of things.
    Martin

  10. #10
    Am I a little confused here~

    Is this common practice to shoot the mother first and then any dependant fawns if they can,
    Is that not just an act of cruelty leaving an orphaned fawn to fend for itself this side of xmas and hoping to pick it up later if at all ... I know some times it may be nessecary to cull mother first for humane reasons but thats a different issuse entirely
    Surely at the mo you would shoot the fawn/s first, then mum if she stood... That's the way i was taught and still practice , atleast till mid jan if not later

    Picture taken towards the back end of this years Rut


    wot would happen to this calf if mum was shot around now and it took off with the other hinds ????

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