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Thread: What is the likelyhood?

  1. #1
    SD Regular vizslamad's Avatar
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    What is the likelyhood?

    As per title of this happening again. Adamant and I were stalking on Sunday morning on my good friend Richards patch and I had already made my mind up on my cull beast on the day before when we were pheasant shooting when I spotted a young fallow with the lower part of a back leg missing.

    Off we trotted to our respective high seats on the Sunday morning after spending the night in the log cabin thanks to John, Richards brother and kept warm by burning a small forest in the Aga and later by our respective Hungarian Vizslas sharing our beds.

    I arrived at my seat and on the journey incredibly due to the unmistakeable sound of footsteps in icy leaves had already spotted a group of does that were shootable apart from the fact that the bullets path would be towards a farmhouse and also my intended target was not amongst them. Up into the high seat and the waiting game started and I watched a lot of deer that that I could have taken but not what I had decided on, however my three legger eventualy poked its nose out at about 120/130 yards and played hide and seek behind trees and all the usual ploys so as not to present a broadside.

    Then came a shot from in the wood and I knew Adam had connected after Richard who had contacted me on the two way and was still feeling ill and did not want to stalk was going to try and stir the deer up a little and pick up Adam from his high seat and take him for a little wander.

    My little fallow continued to play his game and I thought bugger this is going to be a blank perhaps I should have taken one of the others, but then shortly after my mates shot he made his fatal mistake at last, 3/4s on not perfect but done.

    Anyway answers to my question ladies and gentlemen what do you think the odds are on of two guys going out one morning together and each shooting a three legged fallow. Because Adam and I did last Sunday, also whats your view on this, do you always take these as a matter of priority or do you feel that they will survive any way and do OK.

    Mine was a 35ish pound buck fawn but Adams was a nice 70 pound doe.

    One more thing, I have managed to get some sleep now and if Adam ever tells you he cannot shoot pheasants the man speaks with forked tongue!

    One other thing, dont know if you will read this Richard but thanks for your hospitality and a great weekend.

    John.
    Last edited by vizslamad; 01-12-2010 at 01:40.

  2. #2
    An excellent morning out in Hertfordshire, despite the fact that it was colder than a penguin's chuff and the frosty ground made it sound like walking on cornflakes. Not to mention the fact that John had somehow managed to set the alarm on his phone for 4.30AM and then, whilst trying to turn it off, dropped it down the side of his bed where it remained for about 20 minutes, still going off at full volume.

    At first light, I crunched my way to the far edge of the woodland and got into one of Richard's many wooden highseats. Given the temperature, I reflected that John might have had a point when he opted for his usual fully enclosed highseat, containing a paraffin heater and a selection of blankets... I had been in the seat for about half an hour, letting the wood settle down, when I heard a noise about a 100 yards to my front left. I readied the rifle and shifted myself into a comfortable shooting position, only to be confronted with a bloody dog walker taking a short cut through the wood! Game over...

    Richard then turned up as promised and we took a mooch through another section of the wood, getting onto a large group of 30 or so Fallow. Unfortunately, due to their location of the boundary of the wood, none of them were shootable, so we moved on along the north face of the wood, on the basis that we'd either find a shootable deer or - because of the noise underfoot - push them towards John's shooting position further round the hill. As we got near the front of the wood, the ground was quiet and we made stealthier progress, allowing us to stalk to within 90 yards of a lone Fallow doe. Richard checked her out through his binoculars and confirmed he was happy for her to be culled (Richard manages his herd very proactively and is very clear which deer he wants to leave and which he wants taken out). So it was up with the sticks, drop the centre dot of the scope on her shoulder and squeeze the trigger.

    Oddly, the deer showed no reaction to the shot other than to trot off - there wasn't even the usual 'drum' sound of a solid hit. I was using the .300WM with 220gn partition bullets, so was probably slightly over-gunned for Fallow. Richard announced that I'd obviously missed, and despite my protests that I couldn't have, even I was feeling a bit dubious following the sound and shot reaction. However, we walked to the spot where the doe had been and, keeping 25 yards apart, walked on in the direction shed taken after the shot. We hadn't made 40 yards when Richard found her, with a clean heart/lung shot exiting a little far back, so she's obviously been more quartered than she looked. More interesting, she only had three legs, with the rear offside leg missing about 2" below the lower joint. The wound looked to be recent as it hadn't healed over but she showed no sign of loss of condition or any infection. The big .30 calibre bullet had made a 1" entry hole and a 1" exit hole with a similar sized wound channel and very little meat damage. I gralloched her whilst Richard went to get the quad bike to extract the carcass.

    Then it was back to Richard's at Stalkers UK mission control for a breakfast of wild boar sausages and locally cured bacon, before a long and tedious drive back over the the Welsh borders. Thanks to Richard for an excellent morning out, despite the fact he was suffering from a dose of man flu.

    A.

  3. #3
    Do you think that the missing legs were blown-off on some other ground where the fallow do their circuit, or were they fence casualties ? Fence casualties often get hung-up and just struggle - poor beasts - until they die.
    Opinions often differ according to unknown circumstances.

  4. #4
    Well done lads, a good morning out, except for the deer obviously.

    Adam got his taste for wingshooting in Africa, got very pally with a gentleman in tweed called "Dug" or "Excavate" or something.

    I hadn't realised you boys were actually sleeping with you dogs however, surely a step too far in the furtherance of bonding?

  5. #5
    nice one job well done those highseats sound nice adam

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Grandhubert View Post
    Well done lads, a good morning out, except for the deer obviously.

    Adam got his taste for wingshooting in Africa, got very pally with a gentleman in tweed called "Dug" or "Excavate" or something.

    I hadn't realised you boys were actually sleeping with you dogs however, surely a step too far in the furtherance of bonding?
    That would be the infamous Mr 'Bo' Diddley Haddock and I'm not sure his advice of 'don't shoot the bloody Flamingos' was terribly helpful in a wood in Hertfordshire, even allowing for the close proximity of Whipsnade Zoo...

    Quote Originally Posted by ecoman View Post
    Do you think that the missing legs were blown-off on some other ground where the fallow do their circuit, or were they fence casualties ? Fence casualties often get hung-up and just struggle - poor beasts - until they die.
    Most likely fence injuries or road casualties I'd think.

    Quote Originally Posted by mereside View Post
    nice one job well done those highseats sound nice adam
    Imagine our Vizlamad sitting in a child's wendy house on stilts - very comfy but not exactly butch...

  7. #7
    Nice one guys.

    Hope to catch up soon.

    Jonathon

  8. #8
    Great write up guys.

    In answer to your questions John i would have thought shooting a three legged fallow should be a priority over other beasts (but i have only a very limited amount of experiance). Quite unusual i would have thought for two to go out and bag one each on the same morning.

    Good work nonetheless.

    Jim

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