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Thread: Familiarity does breed mistakes.

  1. #1

    Familiarity does breed mistakes.

    While making some freshly batched 45/70 this last couple of days, I obviously had not been paying full attention to the task in hand, on arrival at the quarry, the new loads were offered up singly to the loading port, (as I was a little wary of the size of the meplat on these replacement bullets), an instant realisation set in, the ogive on the Barnes Originals was completely different to the Speer's, so c.o.a.l. was just outside the max, , a simple, basic cockup............. due no doubt to familiarity breeding a lack of attention to detail............ only apparent on loading, the difference must only have been a couple of thou', but very critical in a lever action, I managed to discharge the few needed to zero the scope, & returned the remainder to the bench & properly adjusted the die! now need to re check zero & make mental note to, PAY ATTENTION when at the loading bench!
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  2. #2
    Back in the pistol days, a very experienced hand loader I shot with, was working up a load for his S&W 41. He made the mistake of loading a batch of rounds without double checking the powder he was using was the correct one. After firing 3 rounds from the revolver at the range, with much higher than the expected kick and boom he flipped out the cylinder and found that he could not eject the spent cases. Cant remember the details of the powder types now, but he was lucky that it only cost him a new cylinder.

    Fred

  3. #3
    Back in my youth I was loading for a Danish Krag in 6.5x55. I was loading .266" cast bullets like I did with all of my 6.5's and lordy! The thing kicked and accuracy was terrible! My gunsmith uncle insisted that I do a chamber cast: a detail I'd skipped in my arrogance. The neck was so tight that I had zero clearance and the groove diameter was .263" inches. If I'd loaded my other mold, which cast .268", and managed to chamber it, I'd probably have blown the rifle up, even with the light loads I was using.~Muir

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Milly View Post
    Back in the pistol days, a very experienced hand loader I shot with, was working up a load for his S&W 41. He made the mistake of loading a batch of rounds without double checking the powder he was using was the correct one. After firing 3 rounds from the revolver at the range, with much higher than the expected kick and boom he flipped out the cylinder and found that he could not eject the spent cases. Cant remember the details of the powder types now, but he was lucky that it only cost him a new cylinder.

    Fred
    The pistol pistol range I used to shoot at in Sheffield had a S&W revolver that some one had "Bullseyed". The top-strap was bowed upwards and two of the cambers had blown out of the side of the cylinder. Fortunately the firer escaped with just a bruised hand and dented pride.
    You can't say muntjac without saying, Mmmmmm.

  5. #5
    All is now as it should have been first time round, I had a bit of daylight in my favour this afternoon, on returning from a Rodenator training course, a couple of clicks on the scope & a V bull was produced at fifty yards, would think that adequate for a moon shoot.
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  6. #6
    Hiya
    My local gunsmith had a blown up revolver hanging from his lightshade.~He said it was jiggling the handle of the Lee progressive press and the autodisk double charging.Doh....!
    MARK

  7. #7
    'Ever powdered and bulleted a case with no primer in it ? I have. One of the penalties of getting distracted and taken away from the bench. No harm done but what a waste of time.

    I know that it's not always easy to do so with very small fast charges on some cases, but at least with the bottleneck cartridges I load, a visual check becomes the norm. Even a heavier case can show a differeence in powder level and that calls for a re-weigh before moving on.
    No - I have not always weighed my cases. In most instances a slight difference will not be noticed over and above my human frailty and general rest placement on the hill.
    Opinions often differ according to unknown circumstances.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by marky123 View Post
    Hiya
    My local gunsmith had a blown up revolver hanging from his lightshade.~He said it was jiggling the handle of the Lee progressive press and the autodisk double charging.Doh....!
    MARK
    A good case for visible inspection of powder levels in the case.... as is suggested by loading manuals. (And why I don't like progressive loaders!)~Muir

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