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Thread: Calibre .297-250.

  1. #1

    Calibre .297-250.

    Hi All,

    When i get to my 10 postings,i will be putting up for sale on behalf of a friend, 100 rds of .297-250 HP Rook Rifle Ammo. He gave up his licence some time ago and the ammo is now with an RFD. If there is enough interest,i will supply all details,so you can deal direct. [YEOVIL AREA].

    Regards "Dances with Deer".

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by carolgee56 View Post
    Hi All,

    When i get to my 10 postings,i will be putting up for sale on behalf of a friend, 100 rds of .297-250 HP Rook Rifle Ammo. He gave up his licence some time ago and the ammo is now with an RFD. If there is enough interest,i will supply all details,so you can deal direct. [YEOVIL AREA].

    Regards "Dances with Deer".

    Welcome,, firstly you will need to check if it's short or long. They made both in Morris ammunition. The cartridge was originally used in the Morris Tube adaptors that fitted into the service rifles for practie and training on short ranges like in the drill hall. The ammunition is collectable anyway in it's own right.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Brithunter View Post
    Welcome,, firstly you will need to check if it's short or long. They made both in Morris ammunition. The cartridge was originally used in the Morris Tube adaptors that fitted into the service rifles for practie and training on short ranges like in the drill hall. The ammunition is collectable anyway in it's own right.
    Kev, I thought it was only the 297-230 that came in two lengths. The 250 cartridge wasn't the military training round, it was purely for sporting use.
    You can't say muntjac without saying, Mmmmmm.

  4. #4
    Harry you may well be right. Rook calibres were never my interest.

    It's all locked up now but I'll dig into the books in the libary tomorrow and check. Either way the cartridges are collectable. It's finding somone who wants them. I have a small cartridge collection but it's not serious and I get a lot of grief from Plod about it. One thing they hate is that I have a sealed brick of 100 rounds of Kynoch 30-30 which says loaded with Swedish componants. Don't know what colour the boxes are as they are sealed in brown paper. I also have a 100 rnd brick of Kynoch 7.92mm with 154 Grn SP bullets and a fewe boxes of 303 sporting ammunition with differnt bullets. at one time Kynoch loaded about 5 different types of 215 Grn bullets for different quarry and different expansion rates. The Hollow tube bullets had different size of hole and depth to them and there was also a different amount of exposed lead at the tip of RN bullets. More lead exposed the quicker it opened up.

  5. #5
    I can give you all a bit of an anoraky insight into Rook Rifle calibres. This taken from my notes on my collection.

    Calibres ran from the little bottle neck 297/230 Short, up to the straight sided .380 Long.

    The smallest Rook Rifle round encountered started life in fact as a Military training round. This is the 297/230 Morris which is found in two forms, the short and the long. Introduced by Eley in 1882 this bottle-neck round was developed to shoot in rifles such as the 450/577 Martini Henry which could be fitted with a removable tube allowing the smaller round to be fired. The popularity of this led to rifles of this calibre becoming available in their own right as indoor practice weapons. The most common examples for this cartridge will be found as small Martini Henry actioned rifles by W.W.Greener and C.G.Bonehill, who were both Military Contractors. The 297/230 Short took 3 grains of Black Powder to propel its 37 grain bullet at a velocity of 875 fps giving 63 Ft. lbs. of muzzle energy. The slightly longer round required 5 grains of Black Powder to give 1200 fps and 118 Ft. lbs. with the same bullet.

    Around 1900 Holland & Holland brought out the slightly larger 297/250 Rook Rifle cartridge, sometimes listed as the .250. This is what is consider as the smallest of the true Rook rounds as it was designed especially for this purpose rather than being an adaptation from a round initially developed for a different one. This round fired a heavier 56 grain bullet using 6
    grains of Black Powder giving a velocity of 150 fps and 165 Ft. lbs. at the muzzle. H&H employed what they termed as their Semi Smoothbore barrel in an effort to prevent bore fouling which is an ever present problem with the old Black Powder in such a narrow tube. Various makers adopted this calibre and it is most commonly found in single barrel drop down actions either with external hammer or hammerless boxlock design.

    In response to H & H's cartridge, W.J. Jeffrey introduced the .255 Jeffrey which was slightly more powerful with a 65 grain bullet propelled by 9 grains of powder for 1200 fps. and 208 Ft. lbs. of energy. Although this round was adopted by other makers it is probably the least commonly encountered.

    The most popular round is again a Holland & Holland development and was introduced about 1880. The .300 Rook Rifle, sometimes called the .295. H&H made at least a couple of thousand and, in addition, examples can be found bearing the Purdey name although these were made in only small numbers. This is a straight walled case. The Black Powder round uses 10 grains of powder and an 80 grain bullet at 1100 fps and gives 216 Ft. lb. at the muzzle.

    Next up is the .320 Long Rifle which duplicated the ballistics of the .300 RR and is not often encountered. The next two are essentially the same and are designated as the .360 No.5 and the .380 Long. The only difference being the bullet; the .360 being seated inside the case and weighing 134 grains and takes 14 grains of powder for 1025 fps and 312 Ft. lbs. and the .380 being a heeled bullet of 124 grains 15 grains of powder for a slightly higher velocity of 1050 fps. and 304 Ft. lbs. of energy. Rifles in this calibre are the next most common to the .300.


    Cheers
    Chris

    These from my collection


    .45 A.C.P. for scale, 297/230 Short, 297/230 Long, 297/250, .300 Rook, .360 & .380 Rook Rifle shot cartridge.
    Life should be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving skidding in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming WOO HOO what a ride!

  6. #6
    Chris thank you much appreciated . I have enough trying to keep my C/F sporting cartridge straight without delving into training and Rook cartridges.

  7. #7
    "WOW" What can i say, very little i think.

    Many many thanks for that Chris,what a wealth of knowledge you are.

    Regards "Dances with Deer".

  8. #8

    Mr Don Cox

    Carolgee56

    I would like to purchase the 297/250 ammo you mention in your recent post. If it's still for sale.
    I use a Pape rook rifle of this calibre & am allowed up to 500 rounds on my fire arms cert.
    If the ammo is still for sale would you please send your co-ordinates to my e-mail address
    which is salvator5@aol.com & of course the price required.

    Rgds Don Cox

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