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Thread: Should I reload from the start?

  1. #1

    Should I reload from the start?

    Hello All,

    I almost have the 243 for the Roe sorted. I had planned to buy a few different boxes of ammo and see what it likes, but then I thought - as I'm going to get onto reloading pretty quickly anyway, should I not just start off rolling my own straight away?

    What are your thoughts?

    Cheers.

  2. #2
    Regular Poster buck52's Avatar
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    Snowstorm, first things first
    If your .243 is new you will need to 'burn' the barrel in, so buy some factory ammo.
    The spent cases will then be fireformed to your chamber and will need very little reworking (necksize) for reloading

    You could go out and buy new cases and start from there but I would suggest the above, with the cost of factory ammo today reloading has got to be a better way than buying factory, it all depends of course on how many rounds you are going to use in a year.

  3. #3
    That's a good point thanks. Hadn't thought of it.

    So if were to buy several boxes of ammunition (for Roe ultimately) to try which types would you suggest I try ?

  4. #4

  5. #5
    Regular Poster buck52's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 300wsm
    To break your barrel in and for initial practice IMHO you can do worse that try using Privi Partisan ammo for a start it is only 42 a 100 rounds.
    Spot on WSM,

    So if were to buy several boxes of ammunition (for Roe ultimately) to try which types would you suggest I try ?

    Snowstorm, there is no way of telling , you just have to persevere and find a factory load to suit your rifle as they all perform differently, in addition, even if you do reload, its good to have a box of factory spare in case you run out of reloads.

  6. #6

    Off the track

    I think we are going off the track here a little.

    Personally, I would reload from the start. I would use 80gr bullet heads for roe and I would start with lapua brass. Even if the barrel needed a few bullets through it to wear it in, you are already finding out what your rifle requires.

    IE, get a starting load and work up to the maximum using groups of 4 or 5 bullets, checking for pressure signs. This should be about 20 thou off the lands. (that is already 20 to 30 bullets run through the rifle)

    Then make some more bullets up in groups of 4 or 5 and edge the bullet out in 3 to 5 thou increments until it is 5 thou of the lands.This will put another 20 to 30 bullets through the rifle. Check for pressure signs as you move the bullet out as pressure increases. You may have to move the bullet further from the lands to get more accuracy.

    You should end up with a good group after the powder test, then the group will hopefully tighten with adjusting the depth of the bullet seating.

    You should end with a rifle run in, with a bullet that suits at a cost of approx 2 boxes of average ammo.

    The lapua brass is a little more expensive but definately worth it. Neck size from then on in to provide the longest life possible from them.

  7. #7

    NO

    DO NOT DO IT.

    TAKE YOUR PRESS AND THROW IT IN THE SEA, IF YOU DON'T LIVE NEAR THE SEA THEN FIND A BIG HOLE IN THE GROUND THROW IT IN THERE.

    ONCE YOU START THERE IS NO GOING BACK.YOU WILL HAVE A CONSTANT QUEST FOR MORE ACCURACY, BETTER BULLETS AN ON AND ON IT GOES. YOU WILL HAVE TO TRY ALL POWDERS IN SEARCH OF YOUR HOLY GRAIL.

    Or do it because you will find it massively rewarding and will allow you to shoot a lot more. but all joking aside it is a bit life taking over.

    steve

  8. #8
    I would go with jingzy on this one, provided you give yourself a good start in reloading. Is there somebody living nearby who can give you a hand? I would hate for you to make a bit of a fist of the reloading and be put off it. Also I would not get too anal about breaking in a barrel, the best way to break it in is just use it. I'm not saying that all barrels do not need breaking in but, your average hunting / sporting rifle does not really need it, IMHO.

    John

  9. #9
    This is all very useful advice.

    Can I ask why 80gr bullets? I have read that it's better to go as heavy as you can up to 100gr, after that in a 243 it starts to struggle?

  10. #10
    Have a colleague who swears by 80gn bullets for Roe in his .243. He swears since he has started using these everything has dropped on the spot. 80gn probably don't penetrate as well as 100gn bullets, hence they will expend more energy inside a beast than 100gn bullets - or so the theory says. Also 80gn shoot a bit flatter than 100gn, so less error from misjudging the range.

    I use 100gn, because a) it's what my rifle likes and b) in scotland for all deer other than roe 100gn is the min legal bullet weight, and since I shoot a few red each year 1 bullet weight suffices for everything.

    Not an issue in England - provided you have a 243 calibre and above and you achieve a min muzzle energy of 1600 ft/lbs (I think) you can use any bullet weight you want.

    I would have thought in practice you would struggle to tell the difference.

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