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Thread: Variants between weights of factory ammo

  1. #1

    Variants between weights of factory ammo

    Hi,

    Like a numpty I mixed up some .270 rounds in my cupboard so was unsure which ones were the 130gr.

    I borrowed some digital scales from the local drug dealer, just kidding, my brother uses them to weigh paint when he is spraying cars.

    I was amazed with the differences in weight for example

    The 130 gr varied from 24.9 grams to 25.5 grams?!?!?

    Without taking any of the rounds apart I am not sure if this would be

    1. More powder
    2. Heavier case
    3. Irregularity's with the bullet head weights

    I have checked some of my used cases and there was very little difference 0.1 gram between the 6 that I checked.

    I would assume it is a difference in the powder weights?

    Does anyone know how much of a difference this may have at 100 yards? (my zero range)

    I am not a target shooter so I am sure this would not have a massive difference for stalking but just curious.

    Cheers

    Ross

  2. #2
    Which manufacturer ?

    You'll probably find the cheaper Makes do not follow as tight Specification and Production Guidelines.

    Not everybody is fortunate to be able to get good grouping with some cheaper Makes.

    Rgds. Buck.
    "let him without sin cast the first stone"





  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Buck View Post
    Which manufacturer ?

    You'll probably find the cheaper Makes do not follow as tight Specification and Production Guidelines.

    Not everybody is fortunate to be able to get good grouping with some cheaper Makes.

    Rgds. Buck.
    These were all Federal.

    As you will see from my post today.

    Carlton Moor Tunnel Range

    The groups were not too bad? <3/4 inch at 100 yards with my .270 Tikka T3.

    Cheers

    Ross

  4. #4
    I have never understood the fetish Englishmen have with weighing factory ammunition. The variance you found is due to a variance in all three components but the brass is most likely the heaviest hitter, then the powder charge (Loaded by Volume, don't you know?) then the bullet. It is of no consequence, as you have found. Does that digital scale weight in grains?? It is far more precise than grams in this instance.......~Muir

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    I have never understood the fetish Englishmen have with weighing factory ammunition. The variance you found is due to a variance in all three components but the brass is most likely the heaviest hitter, then the powder charge (Loaded by Volume, don't you know?) then the bullet. It is of no consequence, as you have found. Does that digital scale weight in grains?? It is far more precise than grams in this instance.......~Muir
    Us Englishmen like to weigh everything. As I speak now I am sat on a chair that weighs precisely 7.53kg and the keyboard I am typing on weighs 0.763kg.

    The scales my brother lent me only weigh in grams and ounces. I should really get some reloading equipment as I already know the benefits of reloading for accuracy and also cost.

    Although I would be hard pushed to get better accuracy for the Remington 700 .243 should I decide to home load.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Cheers

    Ross

  6. #6
    Interesting! I conducted a somewhat similar exercise not too long ago, and found that the variance was in the brass, especially between manufacturers!!! I got frustrated with federal's powershock performance in my .243, so took some apart, and found that there were some quite big differences in powder loadings, up to 1.5 grains between a sample of my last 10 factory rounds (needed the brass for reloading, and didn't feel I could be bothered wasting my barrell putting that junk through first). I have the detailed results somewhere, but not here at the office

    needless to say, there were big variations in drop,,,well 'big', at 150 yds, from bullseye to 3" low - and NOT because of my shooting either...so no longer using that stuff, now going with home-loads or norma if I don't have time to reload for one reason or another (or I'm waiting for materials from my dealer).

  7. #7
    Hence the reason we hand loaders get pretty anal about factory ammo. Take a random box of factory ammo, measure the variations in OAl, dismantle the rounds and weigh the powder charge and brass, it would scare you......

    However, most of thw world seems to get by shooting factory ammo. You wonder how they do it.

    Actually, I have long come to the conclusion that OAL is the most important thing to get right, minor variations in charge and brass weights is neither here nor there, but some of you guys probably knew this 40 years ago, I am a later bloomer.
    Brian.

    Just because you are paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you......

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Claret_Dabbler View Post
    Hence the reason we hand loaders get pretty anal about factory ammo. Take a random box of factory ammo, measure the variations in OAl, dismantle the rounds and weigh the powder charge and brass, it would scare you......

    However, most of thw world seems to get by shooting factory ammo. You wonder how they do it.

    Actually, I have long come to the conclusion that OAL is the most important thing to get right, minor variations in charge and brass weights is neither here nor there, but some of you guys probably knew this 40 years ago, I am a later bloomer.
    Have you found that at 100yds you can bug-hole with one AOL, but then at 150 and 200 the group opens up, whereas a different AOL and same 100 yds group retains its grouping ability better over longer ranges?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by r.atkinson View Post
    Us Englishmen like to weigh everything. As I speak now I am sat on a chair that weighs precisely 7.53kg and the keyboard I am typing on weighs 0.763kg.

    The scales my brother lent me only weigh in grams and ounces. I should really get some reloading equipment as I already know the benefits of reloading for accuracy and also cost.

    Although I would be hard pushed to get better accuracy for the Remington 700 .243 should I decide to home load.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG00080-20110228-1713.jpg 
Views:	35 
Size:	305.2 KB 
ID:	5208

    Cheers

    Ross
    Hard to beat that! Did you weigh the Remingtons??~Muir

  10. #10
    Hi Muir,

    I was very pleased with the American set up I have. Remington 700 VLS .243, Leupold Vari-XIII 6.5x20 and Remington ammo. All I need is a stetson and some cowboy boots!!

    Got my brothers trusty scales out.

    Weighed 7 of the Remington Accutip 75gr .243

    5 weighed 18.8 grams
    2 weighed 18.9 grams

    The weight is a lot more consistent than the Federal's I put through my .270

    I will get a box of Remington 130gr .270 and give them a try. I think they are cheaper than Federal ammo anyway.

    Cheers

    Ross

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