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Thread: Using New Brass

  1. #1

    Using New Brass

    When using new brass should you run it through your full length resizing die and trim all to the same length?

  2. #2
    Yes. This is essential. New brass can be very irregular, so a FL check with a vernier is standard practice.

  3. #3

    new brass

    hi,

    I just loaded some new lapua brass this week end just gone, all I did before loading it was push it gentle into my neck sizing die to ensure the case mouth was perfectly round.

    It shot the best groups the rifle has ever achieved.

    If its new from the factory it should be in the correct tolerances.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by digs View Post
    If its new from the factory it should be in the correct tolerances.
    Absolutely NOT true. The operative word you used was "Should". Every loading book you can buy will tell you strictly not to do this. All brass must be checked, this is NOT to say that it will all need sized. All factories have tollerances, which means exactly that, it's NOT all the same size, but rather should be within tollerance, which MAY not match the rifle.

    You were simply lucky in this situation.

    No one should take advice from the general public online (including me!) when reloading. Read books written by ballistics professionals, like THIS one.

  5. #5
    That being said, Lapua brass is extremely expensive, you are paying for accuracy in manufacture. However, the fact remains that it MUST be checked. Not checking is almost as silly as assuming that each powder measure is bang-on; you just don't do it. We're dealing with explosions here, not sharpening a pencil.

  6. #6
    It would depend on the type of shooting you are into ,

    You need to do a quality control,

    The new cases are a product that are made to a tolerance like the chamber in the rifle ,
    For first time firing , check that the condition of the cases are free from dents ,
    check the mouth of the case for burrs and a small champher into the case ,
    check the primer pocket is clean and square ,
    you could ream the gas hole through into the body of the case .
    When you fire the new case they will take the tolerance of your chamber this fire forming , then as you reload you will check the length of the cases and trim to length , and when the case dimension changes and it becomes tight on closing the bolt you would then use you dies to return the cases to a prediturmind dimension .

    ATB

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Outback View Post
    You need to do a quality control
    Exactly.

  8. #8
    Thanks Lee303 and ATB, I think I will put them throught the sizing die and trim just as with fired case.

  9. #9
    NP Muntjac, only too glad to be of help.

    Although the contrary may seem evident, I am not sponsered by the writers of THIS book, nor am I Richard Lee himself, and I do realise that I keep preaching on about THIS book in various threads throughout this forum, but I really can't recommend it enough.

    One final word I will say, is that if you intend to use the brass in the same rifle everytime, I would avoid full length trimming too often. The brass will 'fire form' to the rifle chamber in question, and will usually only require neck sizing after the initial full length check/trim of the new brass. Full length trimming everytime will result in massive brass flow, causing work-hardening which will lead to extremely brittle cases that could split easily and will certainly not last half as long as they should.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee303 View Post
    NP Muntjac, only too glad to be of help.

    Although the contrary may seem evident, I am not sponsered by the writers of THIS book, nor am I Richard Lee himself, and I do realise that I keep preaching on about THIS book in various threads throughout this forum, but I really can't recommend it enough.

    One final word I will say, is that if you intend to use the brass in the same rifle everytime, I would avoid full length trimming too often. The brass will 'fire form' to the rifle chamber in question, and will usually only require neck sizing after the initial full length check/trim of the new brass. Full length trimming everytime will result in massive brass flow, causing work-hardening which will lead to extremely brittle cases that could split easily and will certainly not last half as long as they should.
    On the contrary, all fired cases need to be checked for full length dimensions, the above post was I am fairly sure meant that full length SIZING was not required, just neck sizing, if you have a soft case that flows forward on first firing, & you reload the case without a length check, you could end up trying to chamber something that is too long!.
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

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