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Thread: Limping yearling

  1. #1

    Limping yearling

    Hi,

    There's a doe with two yearling kids on my grounds here in Scotland, I noticed one of them is limping quite a bit on one of the hind legs, and when they ran off, this one lagged far behind. Should I observe for a week or so, and see if it gets better or worse before deciding to cull it? they are both quite healthy looking otherwise, so I'd prefer to let them grow up to be honest....

    My concern is just that it might stop walking and lie down and not get up again, or it falls and gets entangled in a fence, since it is the hind leg, and that's the one used for hopping over the fences

    what would you guys do,,,esp seeing that we are quite far into March...not sure if buck or doe kid, didn't have the chance to tell from a distance yet.

  2. #2
    Cull, you do not know if it is an injury or genetic defect. If a doe likely to pass it on. If it is an injury could survive but suffer. Jim

  3. #3
    As you say after observation you may decide to cull it . If it is suffering in any way at all the I would WITHOUT HESITATION.

    Rgds, Buck.
    Last edited by Uncle Buck; 14-03-2011 at 17:13.
    "let him without sin cast the first stone"





  4. #4
    Get it shot on sight, your the deer manager well manage the deer, it's injured get it sorted ,before Rolf Harris is crawling all over the ground .

    You as the deer manager have the responsibility to manage a population of deer you shouldn't be waiting, A week or a day, it's off right there and then, after it is laying in front of you dead you can look for a problem, cause if you so wish.

  5. #5
    +1
    I`m afraid when i die the wife will sell my gear for the price i told her

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by widows son View Post
    Get it shot on sight, your the deer manager well manage the deer, it's injured get it sorted ,before Rolf Harris is crawling all over the ground .

    You as the deer manager have the responsibility to manage a population of deer you shouldn't be waiting, A week or a day, it's off right there and then, after it is laying in front of you dead you can look for a problem, cause if you so wish.
    Thanks for confirming what I already thought, appreciate it. I couldn't have taken it the other night though, it was too dark and the fog was coming in, but hopefully tonight should be possible, as they will come out to feed the same place again.

  7. #7
    Bob and Jim are bang on infact your post should have read i saw a doe with two kids and one was limping. I shot it on sight and this is what was wrong. You might have really missed a chance at proper management.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by 6pointer View Post
    Bob and Jim are bang on infact your post should have read i saw a doe with two kids and one was limping. I shot it on sight and this is what was wrong. You might have really missed a chance at proper management.
    No offense, but couldn't have the other night, too far out, too dark, and fog was coming in, not safe, but will try tonight. I agree with you otherwise

  9. #9
    Pkl it may have sounded harsh but sometimes the decisions have to be on the spot ,I have a attitude that sick or injured must be removed straight away no matter what the season is if there is kids, calfs at foot ,they then must be remove depending how far on they are ,that's the requirements of deer management some will tell you different why I don't know but will argue black is white .

    This is one of the very reason we carryout deer management constantly controlling ,and maintaining a healthy population ,when carrying out your cull plan sick and injured deer are always at the top of the list,no one can then say your just there for trophies and medals .

    The same goes for crop management if damage is occurring is your job to remove the problem the very reason there is laws which allow us as deer managers to carryout the management in a lawful manner .

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by PKL View Post
    Hi,

    There's a doe with two yearling kids on my grounds here in Scotland, I noticed one of them is limping quite a bit on one of the hind legs, and when they ran off, this one lagged far behind. .
    As deer managers, we should attempt to replicate what nature would have done if we hadn't destroyed the natural predators! Any slow deer would be first on the wolves menu!
    YOU are now the wolf!
    MS

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