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Thread: Limping Yearling - follow up story

  1. #1

    Limping Yearling - follow up story

    Further to my last post where I had spotted a yearling (well, kid from last year) with a limp in its right hind leg, feeding with its sibling and older doe mother in the late evening, I made a trip on Saturday to establish whether it required culling, etc.

    Nevertheless, I walked a mile around the field I saw them feeding in previously, to allow a stalk into the wind, crawled up along a stone wall, and rightly so, about 100 yds out of the woods in the field, they were feeding away. I spent a couple of minutes observing them from about 125 yds out, and their mother was not there! I am guessing she was either shot or involved in an RTA since two saturday's ago. I also noticed that in fact BOTH the young does had limps in their hind leg,,,could it be genetic?

    Well, the decision was easy, so I took up a solid rest with the .243 and my home-loaded 87g Hornady BTHP's on the stone wall. Followed the one with the worst limp until it was broadside, and let one down range at Heart/Lung zone. The young doe went straight down, dead on the spot. The sister looked up, turned broadside, and I let one fly at the same H/L zone, spun around on the spot, and fell over stone dead. Not one step from either, nice shooting, happy with my new loads.

    Waited 5 minutes, picked up my brass, gloves, etc. and strolled over to conduct inspection and gralloch. Nice healthy deer, but both with leg injuries as per below pictures. One had a nasty cut on the upper leg in the haunch region, exposed flesh and with abnormal growth forming around it. The other had a deep cut to its lower leg, flesh wound, which was dirty. Needless to say, the mother probably dragged them over way too high barb wire fences, and this could have resulted in them falling into a terrible decline of health, leading to death by infection, etc.
    Attachment 5572Attachment 5573Attachment 5574

    So all in all, pretty happy with the outcome, mind you, it was a long trip back to the car! esp. as the roe sack split, and carrying two yearling kids on your neck along with the other gear, blood running down your back, is tough work...I guess it proves I definitely enjoy it

  2. #2
    Wire fences probably kill as many Roe as the roads do around here.

  3. #3
    Well to say the least you were fortunate enough to get a second chance.

    So well done. PKL.

    Rgds, Buck.
    "let him without sin cast the first stone"





  4. #4
    Well it sounds like your decision was correct and saved some suffering by both. Well done.

    Prov

  5. #5
    pkl,

    two nice deer and well done.

    i would like to add a question to this post and wish not to take anything from your own.
    if this doe with the cut leg ( middle picture ) was not in season would you have shot it on a welfare issue.
    My position is no i would not. its inflamed from what i see and no real infection visible.
    it has also survived 2 weeks and is doing well with a limp so let her go on, not in season mind... scenario.

    as i say good outing well done no issues

    atb f

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by centralbeltstalker View Post
    pkl,

    two nice deer and well done.

    i would like to add a question to this post and wish not to take anything from your own.
    if this doe with the cut leg ( middle picture ) was not in season would you have shot it on a welfare issue.
    My position is no i would not. its inflamed from what i see and no real infection visible.
    it has also survived 2 weeks and is doing well with a limp so let her go on, not in season mind... scenario.

    as i say good outing well done no issues

    atb f
    Greetings, and thanks for your comments.
    Firstly, are you basing your hypothetical decision on evidence only available post-culling? because I think you have to address the situation the other way around.
    To add my personal view to your questions - Since I was unable to judge the cause of the limp via distant observation, and since it was on both deer, it could have been a genetic issue, which I would not want to escalate in my deer population. In addition, I would ask myself, were/are they experiencing pain? the mother was now missing, what impact would that have on them (not relevant if out of season of course, as they would be reasonably independent)?

    So, would I have culled them out of season,,,probably, but not if they were A. highly pregnat, or B. had just delivered their first fawn(s)...both cases of course not being realistic in their 1st yearling year.

    I believe that even though no great infection is visible, the likelyhood of an infection in an open wound so close to ground level, is very high. The upper leg/thigh injury had abnormal growth forming, which could have escalated to god knows what.

    So to answer your question, I probably 'would', yes...caveat - I would have considered further observation to evaluate the situation, given that I knew where the deer resided, and where they fed in the evenings, judge whether they were getting better, remaining the same, or declining in health/limp.

  7. #7
    pkl,

    very thorough anwser and i agree 100%.
    i was only as you say posting a post mortem hypothetical question.
    injuries are hard to assess from a distance and through Binos sometimes make it impossible..

    well done for both initial observations and then the 2nd visit cull and even more so for a very clear answer.

    atb frank.

  8. #8
    hi as i am new to stalking i find it very nice to see that most stalkers do seem to think about reasons for taking animals out and not just for the meat it is just a shame that an estate near me lets the stalking to some foreign shooters who are only interested in bucks no does shot for last 3yrs at least

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by webby954 View Post
    hi as i am new to stalking i find it very nice to see that most stalkers do seem to think about reasons for taking animals out and not just for the meat it is just a shame that an estate near me lets the stalking to some foreign shooters who are only interested in bucks no does shot for last 3yrs at least
    I agree, but that's what pays I guess..people don't generally travel abroad to go home without a trophy,,,sadly! However, why don't you position yourself as an option for them to manage the doe population in winter time? explain the issues with not controlling the doe population, esp. about the possibility of gradually declining trophy quality of the bucks, which could lead to people giving up on their rented grounds, asking for reduced prices, etc. etc. there's of course a whole stack of consequences in not controlling the male/female population ratio. Richard Prior describes this quite well in his book actually.

    every cloud has a silver lining

  10. #10
    yes it might be worth asking will let you all know if i am successful but think with my lack of experiance it will be a no but you dont get if you dont ask
    webby

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