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Thread: procedure for new rifle

  1. #1

    procedure for new rifle

    when firing rifle for first time is it still 1 round then clean it same again and so on or do people have diff methods

    cheers webby

  2. #2
    Pick it up shoot it put it away!

  3. #3
    Insert round, pull trigger, remove empty case, repeat as necessary. Enjoy.

    DC

  4. #4
    Each barrel maker has a different idea on what should be done, I wanted to treat mine as best as I could from the start and followed a shorter version of this

    http://www.border-barrels.com/articles/shoot-in.htm

    Here are some of the other ways recomended

    PAC-NOR Barreling, Inc. - Barrel Care

    Break-In & Cleaning

    Lilja Precision Rifle Barrels - Centerfire Maintenance

    Welcome to Shilen Rifles, Inc.

    Bartlein Barrels, Inc. - Break In/Cleaning

    hope this helps

    Rick

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by DC .270 View Post
    Insert round, pull trigger, remove empty case, repeat as necessary. Enjoy.

    DC
    Exactly. ~Muir

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    Exactly. ~Muir
    What if the guy doesn't have access to electrolytic techniques for removing copper fouling?

    I am assuming here that we're talking about a centrefire rifle using conventional gilding metal, jacketed bullets. If, on the other hand, it's a twennytoo on plain jane fodder, just have it...

    Now, lets see if we can get the other leg up to the same length....

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by DC .270 View Post
    Insert round, pull trigger, remove empty case, repeat as necessary. Enjoy.

    DC
    Yup, forget the 'running in' BS Just go out get trigger time and enjoy.
    You can believe the gypsy warnings regarding 'break in' if you want, experience dictates that it is crap! (couldn't think of a more descriptive euphemism)
    The logic of these exercises are incredible...clean the bore until no fouling then the barrel is conditioned!!!
    So we clean the barrel until it is as clean as a new barrel, great, bore cleaning producers rub hands together now...


    BTW this is MY experience so don't get all hot under the collar and start to tell me I am wrong, I have proven this to my personal satisfaction.
    You want magic break in? Call Paul Daniels.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamus View Post
    What if the guy doesn't have access to electrolytic techniques for removing copper fouling?

    I am assuming here that we're talking about a centrefire rifle using conventional gilding metal, jacketed bullets. If, on the other hand, it's a twennytoo on plain jane fodder, just have it...

    Now, lets see if we can get the other leg up to the same length....
    I have and electric bore cleaner and don't use it after the first cleaning of a new purchase, and then especially when about to use cast bullets. Copper fouling is not necessarily bad. Some rifles shoot better with copper fouling present. Some guys go through their entire shooting lives without making an effort to remove all the copper fouling from their pet sub-MOA hunting rifles. The last new hunting rifle I bought was my CZ Hornet. I cleaned the oil from the bore and proceeded to shoot it. It has had several+ thousand rounds through it without me doing much more than hitting it with a bore snake bearing a drop of oil once or twice a year. It shoots .3 MOA.

    No one can prove that a given rifle would have shot worse if they didn't "run it in". ~Muir

  9. #9
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    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    I have and electric bore cleaner and don't use it after the first cleaning of a new purchase, and then especially when about to use cast bullets.
    Sorry, I really don't get this.

    If you really can shoot 1,000s of centrefire rounds through barrels without needing to clean them, why would you even have a need for such equipment?

    Copper fouling is not necessarily bad.
    Now this I think I can understand. Though, it strikes me that it would probably be a question of degree and this would also depend on the original state of the barrel and the type of steel it was made from. I can see that perhaps "filling" the low spots could even render a barrel more uniform, internally.... I emphasise "Perhaps" as I'm not sure this is what ever happens and I'm fairly sure in my own mind that fouling tends build fastest on the areas where there is most friction first, ie. on the high spots, providing those "high spots" are also not super smooth, as well they might be from the lapping process.

    No one can prove that a given rifle would have shot worse if they didn't "run it in". ~Muir
    Proving a negative is always a tricky one.

    Do you think you can you actually prove that my fastidious, but gentle, maintainance of clean barrels in my centrefire rifles is a bad thing? .... and that they would have shot better had I neglected to follow this practice? I have three rifles which can shoot inside .5moa, one of which (the .223) can even singlehole at 200m.

    The above said, I fully agree that aggressive and careless cleaning can quite quickly damage a barrel.
    Last edited by Tamus; 23-04-2011 at 16:32.

  10. #10
    [QUOTE=Tamus;210820]


    Sorry, I really don't get this.

    If you really can shoot 1,000s of centrefire rounds through barrels without needing to clean them, why would you even have a need for such equipment?



    Now this I think I can understand. Though, it strikes me that it would probably be a question of degree and this would also depend on the original state of the barrel and the type of steel it was made from. I can see that perhaps "filling" the low spots could even render a barrel more uniform, internally.... I emphasise "Perhaps" as I'm not sure this is what ever happens and I'm fairly sure in my own mind that fouling tends build fastest on the areas where there is most friction first, ie. on the high spots, providing those "high spots" are also not super smooth, as well they might be from the lapping process.



    Proving a negative is always a tricky one.

    Do you think you can you actually prove that my fastidious, but gentle, maintainance of clean barrels in my centrefire rifles is a bad thing? .... and that they would have shot better had I neglected to follow this practice? I have three rifles which can shoot inside .5moa, one of which (the .223) can even singlehole at 200m.

    The above said, I fully agree that aggressive and careless cleaning can quite quickly damage a barrel.
    This unit it used to clean copper fouling from some of my military rifles, like the No1 MkIII's that have a huge amount of copper fouling in the barrel. It allows me to view the condition of the lands sans copper and prepares tge gun for cast bullet shooting: the real reason for building the unit. Copper fouling will cause leading to the extreme in high velocity cast bullet shooting. Since I shoot mostly cast bullets, I almost always use this on new acquisitions. For rifles that I do not shot cast bullets from (My CZ Hornet, my BAR 30-06, My 308 Norma, my .222, and others) I do not use it. I used it recently on my 9.3x57 as copper solvent would not touch the degree of fouling the PRVI bullets imparted on the bore.

    As to copper fouling not being a bad thing, it just isn't. Even my 9.3 which was rendered bright orange (I mean orange) (?) shot exceedingly well with rifling lands and grooves absolutely plated with fouling. Would a BR shooter tolerate it? No. I didn't when I shot BR. But we're talking hunting rifles. If you carefully clean your hunting rifles then that's fine. My .222 has only once had the copper completely removed from it -some 600+ jacketed rounds ago- and it will shoot 1/4 MOA without trying too hard. My dad's old Model 100 Winchester 308 has never had the copper removed from it (purchased new in the 60's) yet it will shoot Winchester factory ammo into cloverleaf groups. Again, a hunting rifle, but impressive accuracy. My CZ Hornet has never had the copper cleaned from it and will have rounds cut each other at 100M. Admittedly, not a high pressure round but not a BR rifle either.

    I do know that small pits can be filled with copper fouling but I don't know that it makes a huge difference. I have a BSA Metford Light Express Rifle in .303 that is "brown and round" at the throat but will shoot jacketed 174 grain bullets as well as I can utilize the express sights. (Same with my Model 28 Finnish 7,62x54R) You'd think they wouldn't shoot at all...

    I won't try to prove a negative either! You meticulously clean and maintain your rifles and get the good results that one would expect. I dont' expect you to stop your practices to disprove my silly notions, either. Your style of cleaning is the key. My BR gun was cleaned in the same manner and shot groups that would make a novice weep.

    I guess I'm saying that if you are shooting a BR rifle, or the field equivalent, a varmint rig, then you may clean as you feel necessary. A hunting rifle -especially a factory rifle (or a conscientiously built custom) that has already been test fired- probably doesn't need running in. In the case of a factory rifle, it's already too late.

    As to how you clean it from then on, it's all a matter of what works for the individual rifle.~Muir

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