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Thread: So - what do you do?

  1. #1

    So - what do you do?

    'Ian, are you anywhere around? We have a deer that was caught up on a fence. Do you want to come over and have a look?'

    OK, forty miles away from Dorset, just collecting a couple rifles & due to be over in Taunton in an hour - twenty miles in the opposite direction. Hmmm. Three o'clock now & I would not be able to get down before half past seven.

    A bit more information came out. The deer was a Roe buck & had been crossing a couple stock fences en-route from one wood block to another. It had obviously been caught between the top couple strands, if the blood coating the barbed wire was any indication.

    It had been found lying adjacent to the fence - completely immobile.

    No problem - I'll be down soonest.

    Completed the paperwork for the rifles & the phone rang once again.

    It was the Land-owner wanting to update me as he was concerned that it was probably not worth me driving over. He had walked up to the deer, sprayed the wound with antiseptic, tended to the nearby flock of sheep, and on his return trip the deer had obviously recovered and was now not to be seen. Apparently it was quite a nice buck & he was pleased it was back in the woods.

    Decision time.

    So...... what's a guy to do?

    Rgds

    Ian

  2. #2
    dunno, did Steve have the kettle on?
    "Politicians must be allowed to panic. They need activity. It is their substitute for achievement"
    "'The matter is under consideration' means we have lost the file. 'The matter is under active consideration' means we are trying to find the file."

  3. #3
    Hah, Steve always has the coffee pot going for guests!


    Folks, given the info above - would you take a eighty mile round trip to look for the deer & if so, why?

    Let me know what you would do. I'm hoping you will confirm I didn't make a silly decision.

    Rgds

    Ian

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by IanF View Post
    Folks, given the info above - would you take a eighty mile round trip to look for the deer & if so, why?
    No I wouldn't, unless I was wanting to keep a particular person on side.

    If the deer was trapped and so badly injured it needed despatching there would have been many closer people with the means and the ability.

  5. #5
    Personaly I probably would go and look
    considering it's injuries and the fact the farmer was able to walk upto it to spray it with an antiseptic raises a fair cause to concerns
    It would of been quite traumatised and roe don't deal with trauma that well
    I would imagine part of the reason it got up was more due to the antiseptic spray that might well of started to sting a little just after it was sprayed and the strange odour it was producing
    would like to think this was a happy ending but not entirely sure it will be
    be good if it was thou

  6. #6
    disclaimer-I know how this one ended already, buut:

    Even if said buck had managed to get out of the wire supposedly unharmed, a lot of damage is caused by reperfusion injury after blood flow resumes leading to an oxidative burst and subsequent breakdown of muscle etc leading to renal toxicity, as well as inflammation and could therefore have gone on to suffer quite an unpleasant and prolonged death. Lying by the fence not actively struggling suggests been there some time and potentially damaged itself (other than ischemia)? Worst case you get there and animal needs to be despatched, best case you have a nice healthy roebuck and pleased landowner who in his mind has reconfirmed that you are the man for the job. I'd have done exactly the same thing.

    Ian-80 miles in your new truck surely lacks the "what was that noise?/will we get there?" excitement of the discovery

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by stone View Post
    Personaly I probably would go and look
    considering it's injuries and the fact the farmer was able to walk upto it to spray it with an antiseptic raises a fair cause to concerns
    It would of been quite traumatised and roe don't deal with trauma that well
    I would imagine part of the reason it got up was more due to the antiseptic spray that might well of started to sting a little just after it was sprayed and the strange odour it was producing
    would like to think this was a happy ending but not entirely sure it will be
    be good if it was thou
    + 1

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Apache View Post
    No I wouldn't, unless I was wanting to keep a particular person on side.

    If the deer was trapped and so badly injured it needed despatching there would have been many closer people with the means and the ability.
    Yep, exactly my thoughts - if the animal is immobile, the farmer could well do the job.

    Then, the follow-up call raised doubts in my mind. The animal had been lying adjacent to a flock of rams - in itself an indication that it was severely affected by its ordeal. That the farmer & his wife were able to walk right up the the animal, squirting it with the dreaded blue spray was highly concerning.

    Many deer will suffer 'capture myopathy', collapsing and dying after such an ordeal. All in all, I reckoned that even though the farmer felt it had recovered, there was a good chance it was still in the vicinity and was not in a good state.

    I decided to drive on down.

    On arrival, confirmed the location where it had last been seen. It had been lying adjacent to a stock fence & at the head of a wooded stream bed leading to a major wood block. Thinking about it, it was in no fit state to jump a further fence, therefore it had to be somewhere along the stream-bed. Wind direction suggested starting by the far wood and working back down towards its last known location.

    Jo & I eased down the edge of the stream, glassing carefully, hoping to find (or not) the deer and assess it. Nothing for the first 90m and then, as is often the case, within the last few metres of the finger wood we spotted the beast. A poor second year animal, immobile and looking away from us. Took the decision to shoot it and walked to the carcass, to find it in very poor condition with a high tick burden and obvious injury to a hind leg.

    The gralloch was quick & on opening the abdomen there were severe bruising and blood-clots noted. Further investigation showed a compound break in the femur, the haunch being a mass of lacerated tissue, doubtless from the animal's struggles after the initial break. So, a good call & vindication for the drive down.

    On the plus side, Jo has been working her spaniels to blood (they have already 'found' three beasts) & decided to put them to the trail. Got them to the point on the fence where the blood was evident & they both immediately perked up. Released, they trotted straight down through the thick vegetation, crossed the stream and 'found' within a minute. Nice to see & a re-assurance to know they have the idea - now, we just pray they do not start retrieving bucks to hand come shoot day! :0)

    Rgds

    Ian

  9. #9
    Nice one,
    gut instinct is not normally far wrong.

  10. #10
    Well done Ian - - a good thread and a good result.

    ATB

    JR

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