Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Land for deer

  1. #1

    Land for deer

    Wot is the best way to know where the deer are,ie roe on your land.is it just loads of time just sitting and waiting at different areas at different times Do deer sometimes feed where sheep have been,or does it take a long time for the land to clean itself before they feed in that field

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by taln View Post
    Wot is the best way to know where the deer are,ie roe on your land.is it just loads of time just sitting and waiting at different areas at different times Do deer sometimes feed where sheep have been,or does it take a long time for the land to clean itself before they feed in that field
    Yep, loads of time. And not just different times in different areas. Different wind direction will also play a big part in where you will see them.

    Personally I have found Roe fussy little beggars when it comes to sharing a field with sheep. Sika on the other hand I have seen feeding along side them!

  3. #3
    Taln forget any were sheep are or have been in the last few weeks. Get into areas were you can see slots muddy ground etc check paths and walk ways for droppings .Look for actual signs mark down what you see it really dose not take that long.
    Last edited by 6pointer; 10-05-2011 at 09:14.

  4. #4
    Get out with the lamp that will show the population of deer, then it is down to finding them during the daylight hours.

  5. #5
    remember Deer do not read books for years I was told roe will not mix with sheep believe me it is not always the case
    I have photos of a buck that spent a lot of time amongst sheep.

  6. #6
    On our lease in Scotland we have several pieces of woodland separated by moorland. If the sheep are on this ground then the only roe you see are in transit between the woods. Once the sheep are off and onto the good grass down hill for lambing the roe will be out on the moor feeding and in good numbers. I am beginning to discover that it is the most productive time of year on our ground.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by roedeerred View Post
    remember Deer do not read books for years I was told roe will not mix with sheep believe me it is not always the case
    I have photos of a buck that spent a lot of time amongst sheep.
    He was probably sheepish in the presence of his own kind !

    HWH.

  8. #8
    Living in Ireland we don't have any roe so I don't know much about them but I do know that sika will feed alongside sheep.

    In terms of knowing where the deer are as widows son said a lamp can be handy - if you don't have a lamp or don't want the bother then I just use one of the good LED torchs and it will pick out deer eyes at maybe 400 yards. That allows me to cover a lot of ground in short order with something that will drop into my pocket. Any time I lose confidence in there being deer on the ground I wait until it is pitch dark and put the torch over the ground and sometimes the results are amazing. Last winter a friend bought a new lamp and, as a test for his new toy, put it over some ground I'd been stalking. He did this about an hour after I'd given up due to darkness. I reported that I'd seen nothing, he counted no less than 50 pairs of eyes. Sika, what can you say!?

    Walking the ground is also useful but in some respects it depends on what is using the area and your skills of observation. I am lucky in that the areas I stalk only have deer on them and so almost all tracks, paths and the like are made by deer. If you had sheep on the ground then you would have to try and work out if it was sheep or deer making the paths into/out of the forest edge for example.

    The other thing to be careful of is walking the ground, not seeing any actual deer, and assuming it isn't used by deer. I have found that the sika will, unless you are super careful, just wash away in front of you and while you might expect to hear them bark or move away they often don't make any noise at all. My feeling is that they only bark when they are sure you've got the better of them and spotted them; at all other times they just vanish. I suspect roe are similar. So, if the wind is wrong or you are a little noisey then it is easy to conclude that there are no deer on the ground when, in fact, there are lots but you've moved them ahead of you. I've heard that roe will often feed out into fields and will even lie in the sun and that would make life easier than with the sika as you can look over the fields with binos - I've only once seen a sika more than 20 yards from the trees and even then it was so dark we thought it was a dark coloured sheep at first.

    As a sort of parallel problem to this I have also found that some areas with lots of sign (droppings, tracks etc.) appear empty of deer in terms of sightings whereas other areas where I see deer have very little in the way of sign. I can't fully explain this other than that the deer must be using the areas heavy with sign when I'm not present which I guess means in the middle of the night and I'm also guessing they are lying up or holding in groups in the areas with lots of sign but then feeding alone in the evening when I'm spotting them in the ares with little sign.

    If you treat every square foot of the ground like it has a deer on it right now you will start stalking very carefully and you will start spotting the deer but it takes a while to build the confidence that the deer are there (you will never be so careful if you have doubts and think that there is nothing on the ground) so that you concentrate on your stalking. I would suggest that instead of sitting you pick an area to stalk (even without the rifle) and concentrate on it and if you see nothing then stalk another area on the next visit. Pick a small area, say a forest ride 400 yards long, and work along it ever so slowly. If you can keep in cover. Keep the wind in your face of course and take enough time to move very quietly indeed. Recently it took me several hours to stalk about 200 yards as there was no wind and the forest was very quiet indeed, however at the end of it there was a stag standing and I know if I'd stalked those 200 yards in half an hour I'd not have seen the stag, though he would have known all about me, and would have declared the area devoid of deer.

  9. #9
    Taln. (S) , You must look for well-worn paths with slot marks,hair or pins on fence wire,droppings, these are all tell tale signs of deer activity.

    However much you read about you quarry, your best education is out in the field or in the wood.

    Woodcraft is self taught and therefore you have to get out and learn it !

    That said you could go with Widows Son's option and git yer lamp out !

    All the best Buck.
    "let him without sin cast the first stone"





Similar Threads

  1. Deer Stalking on NTS land
    By LuckyEddie in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 05-03-2011, 20:49
  2. Replies: 65
    Last Post: 12-11-2010, 14:54
  3. land
    By joelewis1971 in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 27-08-2010, 20:22
  4. getting deer released onto you land
    By griffshrek in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 30-04-2010, 15:45
  5. Land
    By tony rentokil in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 19-03-2009, 18:12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •