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Thread: little fishes

  1. #1

    little fishes

    nothing to do with stalking but i hope I am forgiven. As I am sure there are many all round sportsmen/and women on this site.
    when out walking the other evening whare the canal meets the river the basin below the lock was packed with small fish from tiny to several inches long this is an area 40ft wide and about 80yds long so there must have been millions of them,I have never seen anything like it before ! Can anyone explain why?

  2. #2
    I would have a guess at them being Roach or Rudd. Is there a water fall or wier near by? there may be more airiated water there or there may be just a food concentration there.
    basil.
    https://www.justgiving.com/John-Slee/
    "He who kills sow with piglets empties the forest of boar" My neighbours dad on new years eve 2011.

  3. #3
    Breeding season I would guess, lots of eggs hatched recently and the idea of safety in numbers

  4. #4
    In warm weather you often see large shoals of small fry packed up. It is a response to predators, and I expect there will be pike/perch sitting on the edges of the shoal. Safety in numbers, and will often be in a sheltered shallow spot with warmer water.

    When we are lure fishing for pike we strive to find such shoals, and in the evening the predators often come alive, can be frantic and exciting fishing.

    Often when you find such big shoals, the rest of the stretch will appear devoid of fish.

    This years fry will be tiny,as spawning will be late spring, dependant on water temp.

    Such shoals are often seen on big reserviours in late summer and fry feeding trout can be a spectacular sight as the charge into the fry which will scatter in panic. Even better when you get big pike doing the same.

    D

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by roedeerred View Post
    the canal meets the river
    In summer months canal water can be low in oxygen, likely that if there is an inflow of river water it is the high oxygen levels that are causing the fish to shoal in this area.

  6. #6
    roedeerred being an avid koi keeper and fisherman my money would be with basil on oxygen depletion
    After long spells of hot dry weather the warmer water cant hold the same amount of dissolved oxygen as colder water can so fish will try and find a supply of water with an increase in levels such as a water inlet, weir,lock waterfall or indeed a basin that will usualy contain a larger volume of deeper slightly cooler water also shallow fast flowing turbulent water will also be eagerly saught out if available.

    The largest or week fish will be affected first usualy with a partial to total loss in appetite and spawning will be the last thing on their minds, serious koi keepers with expensive specimens routinely test the co2 levels in there ponds as standard practice and will add air pumps waterfalls and venturis to permanantly increase the oxygen levels which are vital not just to the fish themselfs but for the biological filter system as well.

    Most of the large trout resevoirs and lakes in my area [wessex] imploy air pumps and huge water fountains to keep oxygen levels high in times of prolonged hot and dry weather to aid in the trouts well being and a trout angler in the now will often target these areas as the trout congregate in numbers in there hunt for food items rissing to the waters surface with the colombs of rissing bubbles in the oxygen rich enviroment.

    In enviroments containing plants oxygen and co2 levels change threwout the day and the link below will probably explain it better than i can

    http://tellus.ssec.wisc.edu/outreach...on_Dioxide.pdf

    The good news is a good downpoor of rain or a slight but constant drop in water temperature will soon have the fish back to normal and if not well thats usualy when the local water authorities step in but luckily nature usualy has a way of sorting itself out without mans intervention.

    Sorry for the long winded reply and i hope this helps answer your question





    ATB
    RICK O SHEA

  7. #7
    Rick thanks for that what had me wondering was why would they go into the slow moving canal basin when the river and beck at the side is flowing quite quickly.would it do any good to work the lock and cause a flush of water and also perhaps oxiginate it.

  8. #8
    I doubt it is due to oxygen, they are seeking shelter from predators and prefer calmer, still areas. Often on the big resivours they will be in bays into which the prevailing wind blows. Chew is well known for it.

    It is common practice for all sorts of fry from different coarse fish species to shoal up, it is a common defensive stratergy, better examples are in shoaling sea fish eg sardines, mackrel, herring, caplin.

    Its a very long time since I did my degree in Fish Biology but if i have a chance I will look up the scientific papers.

    D

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyres View Post
    I doubt it is due to oxygen, they are seeking shelter from predators and prefer calmer, still areas. Often on the big resivours they will be in bays into which the prevailing wind blows. Chew is well known for it.

    It is common practice for all sorts of fry from different coarse fish species to shoal up, it is a common defensive stratergy, better examples are in shoaling sea fish eg sardines, mackrel, herring, caplin.

    Its a very long time since I did my degree in Fish Biology but if i have a chance I will look up the scientific papers.

    D
    I remember fishing on Woodford Bank at Chew when the trout were hammering the roach fry on a very still and sunny day and you could see the displaced scales shimmering and flashing as they fell through the water after each attack. Sadly most of the activity was taking place about 15 yards beyond my best casting range.

    On another day at Rookesbury Mill my brother and I were alone on a lake with a large shoal of perch and roach fry penned up virtually at our feet by trout and bigger perch. We filled our boots alright that day!!

  10. #10
    Thanksguys this is interesting to thisanyway

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