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Thread: Gremlins

  1. #1

    Gremlins

    I had my Smith and Wesson Model 27, .357 revolver out last night for a good internal cleaning before I begin a summer of intense practice leading up to deer season. I removed the side plate screws and removed the crane and cylinder and began tapping the grip frame with a rubber mallet to drop the closely-fitted side plate into my hand. As the plate released, I bobbled the works and the plate went tumbling across the carpet, landing a about 18" from my feet. I set the pistol down on a large white cloth I use for such operations and picked up the side plate. A small part called the hammer block rides in the plate in a groove. It is about 1.5" long, "L" shaped, with a flattened area at 90 degrees to the bend which is slotted to ride on a pin in the action. It's not a big part, but it's black and certainly big enough to see on a beige, close weaved carpet, yet I never found it. I looked for an hour wondering if it had fallen through a hole in the universe. I searched everywhere and never found it. My conclusion? It was never there to begin with. Now, how the devil I came up missing, and when, is beyond me. The gun will function fine with out it (tho a little less safe should a sledge hammer hit the back end of the hammer) and would never have noticed it's lack. I have been working on S&W's for almost 35 years and have never put one back together without the hammerblock.

    Weird. I had to share with someone...~Muir

    PS: Ordered another hammer block last night.
    Last edited by Muir; 10-06-2011 at 00:37.

  2. #2
    "Weird. I had to share with someone"...~Muir

    Rubbish you are just gloating that you still have your pistol.

    I wish I had that problem, I still miss my model 28 and 29 and the various L frames I used to have. I never had a problem stripping and servicing my Smiths, if only I could say the same for the Alpha-proj LBR (long barreled revolver) that I presently have. That's a right fiddle to strip with tiny little pins that need to be inserted in minute holes in order to be able to re-assemble.
    -

  3. #3
    No, no gloating here... I am too dear a handgunner to gloat to someone who lost theirs. I would be really devastated if mine were gone overnight. (I'm not too sure I'd be able let that happen without a fight.) I am sincerely sorry you lost yours. I always wonder what happened to a fellow from the UK -a diplomatic type, last name Rose?- who used to have me reline High Standard Olympic semi-auto barrels with liners turned from new/surplus Model 52 Winchester barrels. Back in the mid eighties I did four of them for him during a few visits to the States. He was in his 70's then. I don't know what he did with them.

    Is your Alpha-proj the carbine .38?? ~Muir

  4. #4
    Muir,

    That always happens to me. Drop a screw or a spring and *poof* it disappears. I dropped a bolt from my car onto my tarmac driveway and it simply vanished. So I put another one down so my eyes could 'acclimatise' to what they were looking for... then that one almost vanished too!


    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57 View Post
    if only I could say the same for the Alpha-proj LBR (long barreled revolver) that I presently have. That's a right fiddle to strip with tiny little pins that need to be inserted in minute holes in order to be able to re-assemble.
    -
    Mike, count yourself lucky you don't have my Taurus .44 LBR. It's an abomination. It's taken to locking solid when firing double action and I can't work out why.

    Alex

  5. #5
    Muir the Alpha-proj is similar to the carbine but the shoulder stock is replaced with pistol grips taking it into a different category under our represive legislation. This may sound daft to you but while it's possible for clubs to own carbines and even for other people to use your carbine under certain conditions, replace the shoulder stock with a set of pistol grips but keeping the frame extension in place and it becomes illegal for clubs to own, and no one else can shoot it either unless they have specific approval on their firearms certificate.

    Alex I've owned Taurus revolvers in the past but wasn't too impressed by them. I considered a Taurus LBR but the Alpha was much cheaper. It is very accurate but the double action is now where near as good as any of my old Smith & Wesson revolvers. A friend when cleaning his Taurus LBR on the draining board managed to loose a spring probably down the plug hole. He replaced the spring with one from a ball point pen. That was two years ago and he still hasn't replaced it with the correct spring and there doesn't appear to be any difference in how it functions.

  6. #6
    So the Alpha is then a very long barreled revolver with a foreend grip? I have handled the new generation Taurus revolvers and they are much improved over the older versions. I have also handles tht enew generation S&W's and found them to be somewhat less than they used to be. In between, I handled S&W's new .45LC/410 revolver at the SHOT Show this January. It looked and felt like a Taurus Judge revolver in the same chambering tho it was stamped "Made in Springfield Massachusetts" on the receiver. Even S&W's "Classic" reintroductions like the Model 19 were rough edged and out of time. None of the new series have full frames: all have those foreshortened frames that take a special wrap around grip. It's sad. I keep buying up old S&W's when the price is right but the prices are going crazy. ~Muir

  7. #7
    I took the forend grip off my Apha because it served no purpose when trying to use it as a pistol.

    I know what you mean regarding the quality of S&W going downhill. I owned an old triple lock in .455 once, before it was stolen off me by the government. The quality of the build was simply superb compared to later models but they are still good compared to recent products. I also owned a .45 1911 made during the war by Ithaca and that was a head and shoulders above later series70 Colts that I owned. Like most things the quality of guns seems to be poorer than in years gone by unfortunately, all down to cost I suppose.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57 View Post
    I took the forend grip off my Apha because it served no purpose when trying to use it as a pistol.

    I know what you mean regarding the quality of S&W going downhill. I owned an old triple lock in .455 once, before it was stolen off me by the government. The quality of the build was simply superb compared to later models but they are still good compared to recent products. I also owned a .45 1911 made during the war by Ithaca and that was a head and shoulders above later series70 Colts that I owned. Like most things the quality of guns seems to be poorer than in years gone by unfortunately, all down to cost I suppose.
    Oh No!! I am so sorry! The 455's were lovely guns. A friend had one that i shot with Canadian "Dominion" ammo. It was a tack driving piece of machinery. I own a 1926 Model Second Hand Ejector .44 Special and think it one of the finest revolvers I own. It was made in 1930, during the Great Depression, and has had much use, but even as it stands it is still a better gun than 90% of new revolvers on the market. The tightest 50M group I ever fired one handed with a revolver was with that gun and a 250 SWC, measuring 3 3/4 inches center to center. Awesome gun. My best with a non-rimfire auto was with my custom 1911. You're right, the Ithaca is a fine 1911. Better than even some of the rarer makers. I am truly sorry for your loss. Move over here and find them again! ~Muir

  9. #9
    In an attempt to hijack my own thread and since I have a sympathetic handgunner on the line, I thought I'd share that I bought a German Sport Gun/ ATI Model 1911-.22 tonight for our local "beer bottle" speed shoot. It is a full sized 1911 with a steel frame, beavertail safety, fixed barrel and armament -grade aluminum slide. I shot it this evening and had a ball. This was my last 10 rounds (shot 200) using CCI Mini Mag 40 grain at 15 yards off hand. I love this thing! They are selling like hot-cakes here and had to get one. Best 1911/.22 I've ever shot, hands down. It feels and handles like a 45 ACP just cheaper to shoot. The magazines are thick steel and I'm sure, indestructible. At 50M clay pigeons have no chance...~Muir
    Click image for larger version. 

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  10. #10
    We can get them in this country Muir but you have to have a 12" barrel and a long bar welded onto the frame to comply with our legislation. Also the same restrictions apply as to LBR's (long barreled revolvers) so they aren't really pistols. Have a look at this link http://www.thetunnel.co.uk/

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