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Thread: English Partridges

  1. #1

    English Partridges

    Following a recent post about partridges i thought now would be a good time to ask all the shooting men and fellow keepers on here if they would go the nextra mile and make the effort to release some english partridges each year , even if its a few reared under a broody hen . Surely if we all do a little it will help one of our rarest native game birds and maybe help our image a little .

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by trouble View Post
    Following a recent post about partridges i thought now would be a good time to ask all the shooting men and fellow keepers on here if they would go the nextra mile and make the effort to release some english partridges each year , even if its a few reared under a broody hen . Surely if we all do a little it will help one of our rarest native game birds and maybe help our image a little .
    i totaly agree they sound lovely on a summers evening! and they need all the help they can get!!!!

  3. #3
    Hi Trouble,
    We have a scheme going round here where all the local shoots release 20 English a season, eggs bought in and incubated and reared on one shoot then distributed, all have colour coded rings identifying where released, any shot during the season, (guns are asked to refrain from shooting them but it happens) are logged where they are shot, and boy do they travel, it has provided the area with breeding pairs and every little helps!

  4. #4
    did a 100 4 seasons ago they didnt really stick that well on our heavy clay ground but on the sandy soil on the top of the farm they liked it and we do have a covey stick around all year which i love to see ,i think habitat is the important thing for release really we have 6 m margins and sandy banks they love to dust

  5. #5
    We put down 100 every year and try not to shoot them, obviously it does happen though. Been putting 100 down every year for 5 years now and we've seen a difference on the farm in terms of numbers for sure. I wrekon around 70% will have moved on to pastures new, but the 30% that have stayed have certainly been breeding. Must make a difference, even if its only on a very local scale ?

    Tom

  6. #6
    Sounds a good idea, we put 200 down a few years ago. They made an appearance on the first shoot day, none were shot. After that we did not see them again all season, until the spring when I saw one.
    That one disappeared never to be seen again.
    Surely to help it would be good if other farms under took some kind of vermin control, even if it was just a few Larsen traps.
    When we first entered the country side stewardship scheme I mentioned this to the boffins that came out, surprise surprise they did not want to know. They did however try to tell me that brown hares were in decline just as we virtually stood on one.
    I feel that for the greys to make any kind of comeback we need to do more then just provide habitat.
    Just my pennies worth.

    ATB

    Nick.

  7. #7
    Saw one with a brood last week great

  8. #8
    We release 100 a year. And shoot them about 20% return.
    We once tried 300 and shot no more.
    We have a wid population now usually about 30 pair on the esate.
    Last year a pair had 16 and reared 14 thats a nice covey.
    I now release in the areas where the buzzards favour less. Though they rarely are quick enough for the greys the birds hate to see them constantly gliding around and leave that area. Sadly its getting harder to find somewhere where the buzzards don't frequent.

  9. #9
    during a gcwt walk a discussion was had about release and habitat was said to be a key factor along with predator control also a theory that just letting 100 odd birds onto your plot is not going to do much good ,looking at the posts there maybe some merit in that ,but established pairs being released onto the shoot did do much better ,any wild bird keepers out there to offer any help ?

  10. #10
    The GWCT have done a stack of work on grey partridge. It all boils down to modern farming and the amount of sprays that now go onto the land. But with good predator control and at least some suitable habitat then they can hold on. The most important factor is don't shoot the ones you have, unless there are good numbers on the ground. Releasing grey partridge has been proven to do little for boosting breeding numbers, the consensus was if you have even one or two pairs of wild birds it is far more benificial to look after them the best you can than release X amount of incubator hatched poults.

    I am also 100% that the release of thousands of redlegs has also contributed to the decline of the GP. My little patch of under 200 acres is not ideal partridge habitat, too may woodlands and hedgerow trees, but normally has a couple of coveys of GP and 3 or 4 pairs come spring. A mile or so away the ground is ideal partridge land, rolling chalk downland, few trees, game crops etc, this has a commercial redleg shoot on it but has next to no GP. I would say there must be a disease/ parasite carry over from redlegs to the wild GP.

    Bit ironic after the dry spring now we at the peak hatch time for grey partridge the weather has changed to cold and wet!

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