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Thread: Deer on newly ploughed fields?

  1. #1

    Deer on newly ploughed fields?

    A bit of advice for a newbie... the fields on my bit of land have just been ploughed. How do deer, (I have Roe and Fallow), cope with this? Will they still venture out onto the rough ground or now will they stick closely to the edge of the fields? Or does it make no difference whatsoever to their habits?

    TIA

    S

  2. #2

    Re: Deer on newly ploughed fields?

    Quote Originally Posted by snapper5
    A bit of advice for a newbie... the fields on my bit of land have just been ploughed. How do deer, (I have Roe and Fallow), cope with this? Will they still venture out onto the rough ground or now will they stick closely to the edge of the fields? Or does it make no difference whatsoever to their habits?

    TIA

    S
    i find snapper
    the deer will tend to feed in the hedgerows as that is where the food is untill the weeds start to grow on the ploughed ground, but often find that fallow will lay out in the field chewing the cud
    mostly they will travel the edges of the fields for safety but sometimes cut straight across the middle
    but in a nut shell , they will work the hedgerows for food and cover more often than not, and roe will stick to the hedgerows unless disturbed
    hope this will help
    stone

  3. #3

    Re: Deer on newly ploughed fields?

    Quote Originally Posted by stone
    Quote Originally Posted by snapper5
    A bit of advice for a newbie... the fields on my bit of land have just been ploughed. How do deer, (I have Roe and Fallow), cope with this? Will they still venture out onto the rough ground or now will they stick closely to the edge of the fields? Or does it make no difference whatsoever to their habits?

    TIA

    S
    i find snapper
    the deer will tend to feed in the hedgerows as that is where the food is untill the weeds start to grow on the ploughed ground, but often find that fallow will lay out in the field chewing the cud
    mostly they will travel the edges of the fields for safety but sometimes cut straight across the middle
    but in a nut shell , they will work the hedgerows for food and cover more often than not, and roe will stick to the hedgerows unless disturbed
    hope this will help
    stone
    I`m not sure on anyone elses views but i find that if the field has been muck spreaded before ploughing, the deer seem to be a little illusive till the smell has gone.
    basil.

  4. #4
    Deer don't eat soil so they don't go there. Roe are browsers and nibble in hedge rows or grass, Fallow graze grass.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Deer don't eat soil so they don't go there. Roe are browsers and nibble in hedge rows or grass, Fallow graze grass.
    They have to go there to get to the hedgerow, the browsing and nibbling was covered by Stone. My point was, if the field stinks of s..., does that put the deer off, i think it does.
    basil.

  6. #6
    I have never seen deer on a ploughed field that has been sprayed with muck. But thats not to say they would not, its just that I have never seen them in a good many years of stalking.

    Roe do not like livestock in my opinion, one very rarely see's Roe in a field full of Cows or sheep. Fallow on the other hand will, in some areas I have even seen them feeding on the hay put out in the fields with the cows looking on.

    Late winter Fallow doe's will congregate into large groups, and on fine days will often lay down in the middle of a field in a group looking outwards so they can see 360 deg around themselves. Mind you these fields are sometimes over 40acres or more, and this was in Northants.

    Roe will keep to cover a great deal of the time, although as we all know they like the middle of fields, when they are chest high in Wheat and you cant see the little buggers

  7. #7
    Can't comment on fallow but agree with silamalc on Roe. I have seen Roe crossing a ploughed field that had no muck on it. The roe moved at a steady walk diagonally across the field and was shot 2 fields after crossing the plough. Didn't seem abnormal in any way and it tasted fine!

    Bob

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by basil
    if the field stinks of s..., does that put the deer off,
    basil i only quote this to put my observations off my ground across

    as all my ground is arable ,which is always coated in a layer of chicken s@@t as the farmer can get a good supply , before planting up with crops, i hav no woods but still a good population of roe which are regulary shot on the edge of such fields, even after newly spread muck and i found the same same with the fallow on my other piece, which often like previously mentioned i often see lay out resting on the fields , anyone that has been to my ground early in jan/feb will no eactly what i am talking about as thier wellies will be a foot wider and 4inch taller after a stalk and stink , not pleasant i can add
    very often the fallow will move across the middle of the fields to get to the other side quicker than going around the hedgerows and quite often i end up with a drag or carry through the s@@t because of this
    but this is what i hav noticed and experienced over the last few years
    stone

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