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Thread: Pistol/Revolver For Wounded Deer Dispatch

  1. #1

    Pistol/Revolver For Wounded Deer Dispatch

    Looking for advice from anyone who has gone through an application for the above, in particular any obstacles put in your way by your force and how you overcame them.

    I applied for one several years ago and gave the reasons as 'humane and safe dispatch of wounded deer...' I was knocked back at the time after my force sought advice from the Deer Commission for Scotland (DCS). The result was I contacted the DCS and managed to get the bloke that had spoken to my Firearms Licensing Dept. It was an interesting chat that included comments like, 'you must be a poor shot to need one...' and, 'why don't you carry your .22RF rifle for that purpose...'. (yeh, more likely to ricochet and 2 rifles slung on my back, the most ridiculous suggestion yet). My arguments were based on the dangers of firing a rifle at a wounded stag from close distance with the risk of a ricochet and the difficulty in following a beast that has run of into an enclosed woodland with me trying to follow with a rifle. Anyway, after the knock-back I let it go.

    Now, as some of my woods are almost (not quite) impenetrable especially with a rifle, I am in the process of applying again for one. I spoke with a very helpful member of staff there today and although he said they issue very few in Scotland, each case would be judged on its own merits. I said I would be prepared to take one of them to my ground and show them exactly what I could be faced with, especially if its involving a wounded and pissed off sika stag. Using a pistol once a year IMO justifies its possession.

    One of the suggestions they offer to avoid a wounded deer running off is, if out with a client I should be prepared to take a follow up shot if necessary should the client shoot the beast poorly. I am not knocking him, its in their guidelines!!! I explained that by me watching the reaction of the beast on being shot, it gives an indication as to where it has been struck and the last thing I would be thinking about would be aiming my rifle at it waiting for a client take his shot! I also highlighted that sika often don't venture far from cover and a couple of steps could see them disappear.

    I am curious as to why more and more stalkers don't consider the use of a pistol. Is it because there are a lot of experts out there happy to use the knife in the atlas joint, or simply don't mind using the rifle at close range on the odd occasion it happens. Personally, on the few occasions I have, I am just waiting for the pain of a ricochet!!!

    Is it further costs that prevent people applying or the suspicion they just won't be entertained?

    Remember, we now all use moderators which a few years ago would have been laughed at by FEO's...

  2. #2
    Your application and it's progress will be interesting. In my dealings with L&B it has always been if you can show genuine need we will grant authority to possess. In the situation you now have I would think that you will be able to show a genuine requirement and having shown reason to discard other options in dealing with a wounded beast I would like to think that L&B will grant authority rather than come up with some stupid reason to refuse.

  3. #3
    Don't know how it works north of the border but in east Sussex they are not keen on pistol but now favour a revolver for humane despatch. I see the fact you take 'paying clients' which is your livelihood and may have to despatch in an enclosed area at close quarters reason enough. If you couldn't get to a beast without lying down at full stretch what's the alternative.Don't really see one.

    Atb Steve

  4. #4
    It all comes back to providing reasonable good reason. A pistol for close range dispatch should be straight forward but it isn't because reasons like you mentioned above will be thrown at you. If you are involved in culling a fair number of deer you get wounded ones that depending on the circumstances could be better dispached by pistol like when in thick cover. The advantage of a pistol is that it is a light weight short gun to be used at close range that can be easily and securly carried by the user that will not impede their normal activity. Unlike the stalkers rifle it fires a much slower bullet that for close range dispatch has advantages. So from a safety point of view when having to locate and dispatch wounded deer in thick cover that dragging a rifle through is dangerous it would be an important tool from a health and safety point of view for such situations.

    How many times a season might you use one though?

  5. #5
    I had a SIG 9mm unrestricted and used it but rarely.

    There's a helpful Fact Sheet on Handguns for Humane Despatch on the BASC website that you might find useful:

    http://www.basc.org.uk/en/department...act-sheets.cfm
    Last edited by Orion; 28-07-2011 at 18:43.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Gazza View Post
    In the situation you now have I would think that you will be able to show a genuine requirement and having shown reason to discard other options in dealing with a wounded beast I would like to think that L&B will grant authority rather than come up with some stupid reason to refuse.
    Which is why the offer was made to take someone to this ground and show them what I could be faced with. Although, it will likely be no different from what most stalkers in Scotland can come up against.

    Mind Gazza, I thought the last time I applied given the ground, numbers and species would have swung it but I was wrong...

  7. #7
    With much, and genuine respect to those who have posted earlier in this thread, I simply do not give the arguments for pistols in humane killing of hunted deer any weight, but I am quite prepared to be enlightened, as long as folk don't resort to personal abuse or SHOUTING.

    I was a very active competitor with full bore handguns before the first ban, shooting pretty much every form of competition from deep breath, one arm extended, serious face target with a .38 to draw-against-the-clock bowling pins with a customised .45 ACP. I much regret the stupid act that deprived me of my sport, much wonderful fellowship, and my lawfully held property. I would love to see the law repealed.

    However, and all the above taken into account, as someone who shoots many deer himself each year and also guides many others who also shoot deer, I cannot recall a situation in the last 18 years or so when I thought: "Blow. I wish I'd got a pistol with me now."

    Never.
    KevinF -

  8. #8
    Distinguished Member tartinjock's Avatar
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    Position and hold must be firm enough to support the firearm
    The firearm must point naturally at the target without any undue physical effort
    Sight alignment (aiming) must be correct
    The shot must be released and followed through without disturbing the position

  9. #9
    When I applied for mine it was easeir to get than a 30-30

    I needed good reason , which like you is difficult terrain where a scoped rifle is not pratical and close up shooting on a moving object such as an antlered beast where a knife is not practical along 2 letters from other deer stalkers stating that I was a contact for following up wounded deer for them
    I use mine occassionaly and has been invaluable when I needed it

    I can't comment for others as I'm sure there are lots out there who are more than capable of dealing with wounded deer with out the aid of a pistol, I know I am
    but the pistol has made it more humane on occassions ( which is why I applied for one )
    best of luck on your app ,as some forces may not like the idea no matter how much you need one

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
    With much, and genuine respect to those who have posted earlier in this thread, I simply do not give the arguments for pistols in humane killing of hunted deer any weight, but I am quite prepared to be enlightened, as long as folk don't resort to personal abuse or SHOUTING.
    Like you I shot with pistols before and honestly I have never been faced with a situation where I might actually have needed one for dispatch. But for example, if faced with a spine shot deer in thick cover lying injured and in agony while only approachable on hands and knees, through thick establishing sitka, it would be the safest and most practical tool to dispatch that animal.

    If you shoot enough deer you will get the odd wounded one that could possibly be better and safer dispatched with a pistol but I'm not at that level of culling. Just my thoughs.

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