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Thread: underlevers

  1. #1

    underlevers

    Always wanted one even if just for the range anyone recommend one and a good calibre, also would one be OK for fox, (woodland) if so which Cal, tia

  2. #2
    Marlin by preference.
    30/30 with a cast flat nose boolit.
    I could even sell you one. lol

  3. #3
    45/70 Marlin 400 grain flat nose jacketed,on ticket for Boar, Deer, & Fox if found to be interfering with a stalk
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by finnbear270 View Post
    45/70 Marlin 400 grain flat nose jacketed,on ticket for Boar, Deer, & Fox if found to be interfering with a stalk
    Or, if you are serious about the occasional, or even frequent, boar.

    .358win

    In a Browning take-down, pistol gripped, BLR... (see the Browning website at http://www.browning.com/products/cat...?webflag_=003b ) an excellent value for money option to plasticky germanic straightpulls (that cost twice and three times as much). IMHO

  5. #5
    I have a Browning BLR 81 in .308win with a 4 round box mag under lever that i use for deer , fox, wildboar and also a .444 marlin which i use for deer, fox and wildboar and the odd rabbit.
    Both are great guns for gods chosen men ( left handers)
    Bob
    Last edited by reiver; 07-08-2011 at 11:02.
    "a man does good business when he rids himself of a turd"

  6. #6
    dodgyrog do you have good results with cast bullets in marlin as i read that they do not like the mico/rifling that is used in their barrels have shot a winchester but like the marlin because of the scope mounting receiver.thanks ps 30/30

  7. #7
    Levers are far more common in Europe than here, and it is (in many ways) strange to understand since they can do some roles very well.

    I have to confess that the first time I was given one in France to shoot, I was slightly embarassed because all the westerns I had loved as a kid had led me to think of lever guns as not really serious and I do take shooting very seriously. However, I found it to be a very good gun and have happily used them with some success since. They are particularly good in woodland with a shortish barrel.

    For choice, I would go for a Marlin 336 in 35 Rem with 200gr for boar and accept that it was a bit OTT for fox. The 35 Rem seems to have a good thump that really slows things down whilst still having a controllable recoil for a follow up shot (and looks nostalgic in this world of big case little bullet cartridges) - however, I'm not sure how easy it is to get in the UK. 30-30 is OK and I think you can go down to 125gr if you wanted.

    The Browning BLR's are good too and I have been told that because of how the bolt locks, they are supposed to be (at least theoretically) more accurate.

  8. #8
    discovery, the microgroove rifling in Marlins actually works very well with cast bullets, possibly better than the ballard rifling which is supposed to be better.
    With regard to a suitable calibre for fox, I know a couple of guys who use a .357 for fox to very good effect.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57 View Post
    discovery, the microgroove rifling in Marlins actually works very well with cast bullets, possibly better than the ballard rifling which is supposed to be better.
    With regard to a suitable calibre for fox, I know a couple of guys who use a .357 for fox to very good effect.
    I have had very good luck with hard bullets and microgroove rifling, but less so with the softer alloys. This has never presented a problem as I shoot hard bullets at almost everything when launched over smokeless powder. That said, in my experiences the Ballard rifling is generally superior for all alloy types.~Muir

  10. #10
    Muir it's hard cast bullets that we use. I can only speak with regard to two older Marlin rifles that I or my club have owned. I was very sceptical of the microgroove rifling but actually both rifles turned out to be very accurate, in fact giving better results than the more modern Marlins with ballard rifling. It must be born in mind though that there are a number of variables and that we only shoot these substitute pistols at short range (up to 50m). It could just be that the loads that we were using are better suited to this type of rifling. At longer ranges the deep cut ballard may come into it's own. I certainly wouldn't avoid microgroove rifling though I wouldn't go out of my way to obtain it either.

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