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Thread: Stalkers V Pheasant shoots

  1. #1

    Stalkers V Pheasant shoots

    Following on from the previous thread, (I didn't want to hijack it) but it raises an interesting point. I have a couple of permissions where the farmer says I can't go on after about August for fear of "upsetting the shoot". I think the argument is that I would disturb the birds somehow. Another farmer, who runs a biggish commercial shoot doesn't seem to mind at all, though. I do not go on, or just before, shoot days, though.

    I think stalking is pretty low impact compared to dog walkers, for example. I'm a stalker, after all - the clue is in the name.

    I have had run-ins with possessive gamekeepers years ago, so always keep out of the way, but it does irk me a bit. Particularly when I know the keeper shoots a few deer when I'm off the land in winter. How come he doesn't disturb them? Also makes the doe cull a bit difficult, not least because I don't know how many he's shot.

    So, should we be out of the way during the bird season, or am I being too submissive? BTW, I am not going to start arguing with farmers or keepers, whatever you lot think. I am happy enough with the status quo and I like a quiet life.

    Matt

  2. #2
    The anwers I think is in your first paragraph, if the farmer says not to disturb the shoot then if he is the landowner then that is just the way it is. Landowners are free to put conditions on access and as long as they are made clear before you sign a contract or shake hands then that is just the way it is. Quiet reasoning over a beer may change someones mind but bickering seldom does. On many shooots a few roe does/hinds are a 'keepers perk, and doing them out it can lead to unpleasantness. A good 'keeper is hard to find and harder to keep, finding someone to pay to shoot the deer in your corn fields is easy.
    None of the above applies if the farmer is not the landowner, then your contract is with the landowner and if he does not prohibit access then you will have to smooth things over with the shoot/tenant farmer with a silk tongue and maybe start the conversation by taking the cork out of a good malt.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by longlowdog View Post
    The anwers I think is in your first paragraph, if the farmer says not to disturb the shoot then if he is the landowner then that is just the way it is. Landowners are free to put conditions on access and as long as they are made clear before you sign a contract or shake hands then that is just the way it is. Quiet reasoning over a beer may change someones mind but bickering seldom does. On many shooots a few roe does/hinds are a 'keepers perk, and doing them out it can lead to unpleasantness. A good 'keeper is hard to find and harder to keep, finding someone to pay to shoot the deer in your corn fields is easy.
    None of the above applies if the farmer is not the landowner, then your contract is with the landowner and if he does not prohibit access then you will have to smooth things over with the shoot/tenant farmer with a silk tongue and maybe start the conversation by taking the cork out of a good malt.
    +1 here landowners put down rules you follow them or move on. Right or wrong thats how it is.

  4. #4
    +1 other.
    I stalk on all sorts of places big commercial shoot where deer are not welcome in drives and new plantings I am told if there are too many deer in any drive.other places shoot foxes first or else.I always make it clear if others are shooting I do not want to be near the woods to cause friction.answer is cooperation not Conflict

  5. #5
    All agreed. Conflict is very much not my scene. I am just wondering whether it is normal and whether others have the same restrictions.

  6. #6
    Yes.
    But i've been around a while and volantary suggest quiet times just before and after a shoot.
    The deer are often gone anyway.
    It all works for the best in the long run better to get on with keepers then not.
    Keepers appreciate the thought.

  7. #7
    one of my permissions has a pheasant shoot but they only have about 8 days so i have dates and shoot weekends in between
    I must say though that on a lot of shoots if 20 beaters with sticks and dogs plus hundreds of shots from 12 bores dont scare the pheasant off then i am sure the odd rifle shot wont

  8. #8
    I suppose the bigger issuse is if the shoot is paying for the rights or the keepers job is at stake then why would anyone want to jepordise it
    Stalking takes place mostly at dawn/dusk
    birds are either coming off roost or going upto roost
    these are the times birds need to be left quiet, disturbed at this time can put them off for days especially if hand feeding as it comes more noticable
    plus birds become familiar so a stranger stalking around them may put them off a little and the crack from an unsilinced rifle will put the wind up multiple pens and especialy the ducks
    I stalk on land which has a farmers shoot on it and also on land I helper keeper on also
    so I hav a bit of savvy about me when it comes to be sympathetic to the other keepers/shoot owners
    if the owner says leave it for a bit then leave it
    if the keeper shoots a few then it's his problem if the birds don't play ball
    most of all I would try my hardest to get in with the keeper and play by his rules a little
    that way you are in a win , win situ
    it may take a couple of seasons but it will be worth it if it works out
    more ground is lost or gained because of the keeper's say so, than any cash placed in a land owners hand

    something worth bearing in mind , if the keeper is of an unaproachable mind set then you hav your work cut out
    but most are happy for an experienced and genuine helper to lend a hand

  9. #9
    Met the keeper this morning. First time since last shoot season. hes part time and his birds have just come.
    He started last year and was very stand offish.
    told him shot a fox 2 nights ago from a high seat.
    Today he told me he saw a nice buck yesterday and 3 deer this morning so his trust is now gained.
    takes time but pays off.

  10. #10
    As it happens, I bumped into one of the keepers from the commercial shoot tonight on the way home. I'd pulled of the road to glass the land for the hell of it. He was a bit suspicious (not unexpectedly) and it was a slightly awkward exchange but there was no particular problem. I had expected a slightly more appreciative reaction, though, when I said I got a fox last night. Not a flicker! More work needed methinks!

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