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Thread: Misfires

  1. #1

    Misfires

    Having bedded my remmy 700 I went zeroing the other day and had 3 misfires. Thought it odd as it seemed to be re-loads that were using a brass primer. The other reloads I had that were ok had a shiny steel type surface on them.

    I then noticed that if I left the misfire in the gun and waited (for safety) then lifted the bolt again to re-cock the gun , the misfire then fired. I am thinking this muct be a problem with the bolt???, could it be gunk in the bolt?? Any ideas please.

    pete

  2. #2
    Seeing as how you have altered the bedding I wonder if the bolt is closing properly now?

  3. #3
    Hi Brit

    Checked that and clearance is ok

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by chickenman View Post
    Having bedded my remmy 700 I went zeroing the other day and had 3 misfires. Thought it odd as it seemed to be re-loads that were using a brass primer. The other reloads I had that were ok had a shiny steel type surface on them.

    I then noticed that if I left the misfire in the gun and waited (for safety) then lifted the bolt again to re-cock the gun , the misfire then fired. I am thinking this muct be a problem with the bolt???, could it be gunk in the bolt?? Any ideas please.

    pete
    Pete

    About this time last year I borrowed a Savage in .30-06 for stalking up in Scotland, as my .308 was u/s. We had a couple of misfires - fortunately when we were zeroing rather than out on the hill - the reason for which was exactly what you suggest. When we got back the bolt was stripped and cleaned, and it turned out there was sufficient gunk to have caused the misfire. Once cleaned, problem solved.

    willie_gunn
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us to see oursels as ithers see us!

  5. #5
    As an addendum to Dom's post, you state two different primers, the "Steel" ones sound like CCI's & the "Brass" ones sound like they could be Remington, this use of differing primers can result in varying results of p.o.i.
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  6. #6
    Thanks for the replies gents and re the primers Fin, yes I understand that but I was just using some pimers up as such and yes they are CCI and some other which I cant remember the name of.

  7. #7
    Rem and Vhit are brass coloured as are I believe some eastern european primers.

    Check that the primers are seated properly. If not they can absorb the blow of the firing pin by seating themselves deeper.

  8. #8
    Yes thats where they were from......eastern european

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Brithunter View Post

    Check that the primers are seated properly. If not they can absorb the blow of the firing pin by seating themselves deeper.
    Will misfire if seated too hard too...

  10. #10
    I am not too sure about that but it was once suggested to me that if the primer was put in with exerted pressure this could damage the anvil in the primer which could cause a misfire however when priming cases, I suggest that you use a hand operated tool such as the RCBS tool. With this tool, you never need to touch a primer,If you touch the primers, you always run the risk of contaminating the primer if you have oil on your fingers, use a good hand operated tool this gives you a positive "feel". With a little practise you can feel when the primer has properly seated home.

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