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Thread: Fallow bucks are more alert

  1. #1

    Fallow bucks are more alert

    I was out in the woods on Tuesday evening when I came across one of the big fallow bucks helping himself to wheat from a phesant feeder in a ride.

    For some reason, it's very rare to actually see and even rarer to be able to watch the big boys for any time. They seem to be more alert and more easily spooked than the does. On Tuesday, I was in a good position under some trees about 120 yrds away with the wind in my face. After about 15/20 secs he swung around and look directly at me, then after a futher 10 secs casually walked off into the woods.

    I've been in situations with does where I've got much closer and without such good cover, and they haven't been able to detect me. I'm convinced that bucks' senses are just that bit better.

    But I suppose you don't get to become such a big handsome beast without taking a bit of care in the woods!

  2. #2
    Turqu
    Guest
    I think it has a lot to do with the more solitary life that they lead.

    Does are usually never alone for very long. They have the advantage of all those multiple eyes and ears working in unison.

    Where as big buck only become big bucks due their increasing wariness. As those that pretend to call themselves stalkers often shoot them on sight.

  3. #3
    Its survival of the fittest. They are only able to grow a big rack of antlers if they dont let anyone shoot them

    Mark

  4. #4
    yup I can see how not being shot would help.

  5. #5
    yup I can see how not being shot would help.

  6. #6
    There's an old German saying, " A big stag never sees the light of the sun or the light of the moon on his back "

  7. #7
    In the Forest of Dean it was sometimes very hard to see a big buck as they tended to live in the outlying woods rather than the main forest and were fairly nocturnal outside the rut.

    I managed it a few times, mostly more by luck than judgement. One dead cert used to live in a small thicket on the extreme western edge of the forest from where you could see the Monmouth - Ross road. To see him I had to throw a stone for my dog to get her running down the hill into the thicket and then quickly run 100 yards to one side usually just in time to see the buck exit at the bottom and head out across the fields.

    One of these big bucks was living in a 5 acre wood outside the forest which was on a rough shoot that I was a member of. Every time we shot there without fail, my mate's golden retriever would get on the tail of this buck which would exit the wood at the same spot with as much dignity as it could muster and head off across the fields with the retriever in pursuit. The dog was gone for up to half an hour, but never got close to the buck. After the third or fourth time that this happened you could almost see the buck thinking "here we go again!" He was a nice buck but he became sort a of pet and we wouldn't dream of taking the rifle to him.

    The largest group of decent bucks that I saw was in March quite few years ago in a part of the forest with a lot of deer but usually only the odd mature buck. I came across a group of seven bucks all of which were 4 years old or more. To this day I have never seen so many big bucks in one place in the Forest of Dean.

    In terms of getting close to big bucks I once tapped one on the back with my stick as he walked casually past me.

    Incidentally the Forest of Dean bucks do not generally have great heads but can achieve very large body weights with bucks of up to 220lbs recorded, how does this compare to fallow elsewhere.

  8. #8
    Paul, there is a herd near me in Dorset, where the same old boy has had the stalking for years. There are 3 white hinds in the group, which are never shot, because it makes the buggers so much easier to spot ! Consequently they get to be a hell of a size. When you see one standing next to an average hind, there is a noticeable size difference

  9. #9
    Turqu
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by paul k

    Incidentally the Forest of Dean bucks do not generally have great heads but can achieve very large body weights with bucks of up to 220lbs recorded, how does this compare to fallow elsewhere.
    Paul

    These 200lb plus bucks are these weights before or after the rut? Also are they larder weights or field dressed weights?

    Either way they are still good body weights

  10. #10
    Turqu
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger
    There are 3 white hinds in the group, which are never shot, because it makes the buggers so much easier to spot !

    They wouldn't last 5 minutes around here. It is our policy to shoot every white or light coloured Fallow on sight. If we don't, they just become targets for the deer poachers with their lurchers.

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