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Thread: The Way of the Sizing Die

  1. #1

  2. #2
    very interesting,
    just out of interest, if one neck sizes only, after how many firings would you be expected to see the extraction issues he refers to and then have to FL resize?
    I understand some rounds flow forward more than others but if you trim and neck size for the same load and rifle is this going to be a problem long term for me?

  3. #3
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    [QUOTE=bewsher500;275923]very interesting,
    just out of interest, if one neck sizes only, after how many firings would you be expected to see the extraction issues he refers to and then have to FL resize? QUOTE]

    Does it matter?

    I mean, if you target shoot only... and let's say the problem either does or doesn't arise somewhere between the first "neck-sized" reload and the last one (before you bin the brass) the worst you'll have to contend with is opening the bolt, which may prove very tricky in itself and bumping the spent case out. Not handy if you're in a competition, but not really tragic either, though potentially not very good for your prized target barrel either. On the other hand, if you are a stalker and it happens (and the odds say it will happen) you face a different set of problems, at best your day's stalking is probably over till you go and get the equipment needed to resolve the issue, at worst you've just made a non-fatal hit on an animal that you have no way shooting again, with that rifle, for quite some time... potentially, very tragic.

    Early on in my reloading career I asked my reloading mentor about neck sizing only, he explained the above to me and advised that in general neck sizing offers very little meaningful gain to the game shooter but could/will eventually cause these undesirable problems...
    So why risk it?

    ps. Just for clarity, I only ever full length resize, but then again I'm not fond of punching any more holes in paper than it takes to develop a load and check my zero (regularly)

  4. #4
    I brought a Lee Collet die set in 300 Win mag when I acquired a Ruger No1B in that chambering. After about 3-4 loads I found it difficult to seat the cartridges in the chamber. Luckily a friend who had brought a Brno ZKK 602 in 300 Win Mag had a normal set of dies so I toddled over to his place and borrowed his press and F/L sizer and bumped the shoulders back. Had to do this every few re-loads.

  5. #5
    That's a really good ad for Sinclair products. Can you neck size in a FL dies set? Of course. Will it hit the cartridge body? Maybe. Will it matter? Not really. Necks usually wear out before the case body. and in any instance, the main reason for necksizing is control of consistent headspacing of the round to prevent undue stretching. Partial resizing will do that fine.

    Brit: Your single shot, like a lever gun, is one of those breeching mechanisms that require a full length resizing.~Muir
    Last edited by Muir; 29-10-2011 at 14:36.

  6. #6
    I am not sure any of those answers really answer my question.

    if you neck size only are the potential issues described real? and does the calibre dictate the speed you will come across the issue.

    I have some 5x fired 270 brass that has only ever been neck sized and trimmed. to be fair trimming is often not needed. I have not had any issues either loading or unloading.

    in which case why FL resize?

    I have a 243 and understand they stretch more but have not had it long enough to test the multiple fired neck sized cases. interested to know though

  7. #7
    Muir I fully understood the issues with the Ruger No1. Sadly it had to go to swing a trade to acquire some antiques, 3 DWM M93 Mausers, not how much stretching will depend largely upon the difference on chamber and dies and just how much working of the cases is required.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by bewsher500 View Post
    very interesting,
    just out of interest, if one neck sizes only, after how many firings would you be expected to see the extraction issues he refers to and then have to FL resize?
    I understand some rounds flow forward more than others but if you trim and neck size for the same load and rifle is this going to be a problem long term for me?
    This is a proplem that has been highlighted for me on my R8, because there is no camming action. However, I am on my 7th reload of 243 Sako brass with no issues, but I now plan to full size before batch 8!

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Brithunter View Post
    Muir I fully understood the issues with the Ruger No1. Sadly it had to go to swing a trade to acquire some antiques, 3 DWM M93 Mausers, not how much stretching will depend largely upon the difference on chamber and dies and just how much working of the cases is required.
    Brit: By "stretching" I meant the unintended back and forth from ill adjusted FL sizing then firing, not the Ruger action. I had a custom #3 Ruger and had no issues because I partial FL resized according to RCBS's time tested instructions.

    Bewsher500: I agree with your mentor. It's not necessary to neck size hunting loads and it can come to be a problem if you aren't careful. Like seating to the lands, it's a practice that is highly overrated with regard to accuracy. What is necessary when Fl resizing and oft overlooked by the uninformed, is to understand that just screwing the die down hard to the shell holder while FL resizing isn't the proper way to do it. I always do in increments until the bolt just closes on an empty case with no resistance. In other words, the case is FL resized with regard to my chamber. Accuracy is better, velocities more consistent (all other things being equal) and cases last longer.~Muir

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    Brit: By "stretching" I meant the unintended back and forth from ill adjusted FL sizing then firing, not the Ruger action. I had a custom #3 Ruger and had no issues because I partial FL resized according to RCBS's time tested instructions.

    Bewsher500: I agree with your mentor. It's not necessary to neck size hunting loads and it can come to be a problem if you aren't careful. Like seating to the lands, it's a practice that is highly overrated with regard to accuracy. What is necessary when Fl resizing and oft overlooked by the uninformed, is to understand that just screwing the die down hard to the shell holder while FL resizing isn't the proper way to do it. I always do in increments until the bolt just closes on an empty case with no resistance. In other words, the case is FL resized with regard to my chamber. Accuracy is better, velocities more consistent (all other things being equal) and cases last longer.~Muir
    Bewsher's mentor said it too did he? I'll have to reread to find where that was

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