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Thread: TB suspected, vet informed, what now?

  1. #1

    TB suspected, vet informed, what now?

    Shot a red hind this afternoon, mesenteric lymph nodes were enlarged, looks like TB to me, didn't examine it any further, rang vet who eventually got back to me, he stated he will contact Starcross centre tomorrow but doubts they will be open, if they are he said i could take carcass and gralloch to them, if they weren't i would have to take a sample to them on Monday, and if confirmed i would have to arrange for the body to be incinerated at an approved premise at my cost!
    Is that correct?
    Cheers
    Richard

  2. #2
    Do you have any photos out of interest? Were there lesions on any organs? Not sure about who has to bear the disposal costs I'm afraid, look forward to other replies with interest!

    Alex

  3. #3
    I did have my camera with me but was alarmed at the sight of the nodes i just decided not to continue with the gralloch and inspection for fear of contamination.
    The portal node was fine.
    Since i posted this thread i have spoken to a BDS member who has experience of this and he stated i have completed my responsibilities as far as the trained hunter should and the owness is now on Defra to arrange collection and disposal, as he stated, if we ended up paying for this then stalkers may not report a notifiable disease, which is bad news for all concerned.
    He is ringing me tomorrow after 10am
    Cheers
    Richard

  4. #4
    Is your vet a farm animal vet who should understand these things or a pet vet out of his depth?

    Legally the procedure is for YOU to report the incident to your local AHVLA office who will advise you on what to do. Usually you will be asked to keep the suspect material for testing. Localised lesions can be trimmed and the meat may still go into the food chain assuming carcase in good condition.

    The AHVLA office will have a vet on call 24 hours a day and you should at the very least be able to speak to someone tomorrow who will advise on what to do.

  5. #5

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Apache View Post
    Is your vet a farm animal vet who should understand these things or a pet vet out of his depth?

    Legally the procedure is for YOU to report the incident to your local AHVLA office who will advise you on what to do. Usually you will be asked to keep the suspect material for testing. Localised lesions can be trimmed and the meat may still go into the food chain assuming carcase in good condition.

    The AHVLA office will have a vet on call 24 hours a day and you should at the very least be able to speak to someone tomorrow who will advise on what to do.
    Apologies i didn't make myself clear, it WAS the vet associated with the AHVLA, he is going to contact the office in the morning and ring me after 10.00am, but having said that he did mention prior to answering the message i left on his mobile he had contacted another vet for advice on this subject.
    Initial investigation on the internet does seem to indicate i might have to pay for the test.
    Cheers
    Richard

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by devon deer stalker View Post
    Apologies i didn't make myself clear, it WAS the vet associated with the AHVLA, he is going to contact the office in the morning and ring me after 10.00am, but having said that he did mention prior to answering the message i left on his mobile he had contacted another vet for advice on this subject.
    Initial investigation on the internet does seem to indicate i might have to pay for the test.
    Cheers
    Richard
    DO NOT PAY ANY MONEY!

    It's statutory testing, the government has no option but to pay for the testing.

    Now the system has got rather more complicated of late with the government trying to save money. What was Animal Health (AH) has merged with the Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA) under the umbrella of AHVLA.

    I would have expected a vet working for the 'ministry' to know what protocol was. I'm just a LVI in a TB free area and I know. Maybe you've got a newbie?

    Don't pay anything because there is no legal requirement for you to do so.

  8. #8
    Hi Richard,
    A few years ago I and a couple of friends ended up culling some park deer that were very small in size for breed (Sika) due to idiotic overcrowding and probably very close breeding.
    We shot 6 of them in a very short time and set about gralloching them - we suspected something was wrong (pussy glands) so I contacted the BDS who gave me a number to ring for a DEFRA vet.
    I told him the story and he said he couldnt make it to site on the day - requested that we leave the gralloch bagged up for him and he would have a look the next day and advised that we should contact a specialist disposal/incerator company who would collect them at my expense 270
    I did as he asked and rang him the next day on his mobile - he was very vauge when it came to giving answers and waffled on about different types of TB and then really p----d me off when he said he couldnt really tell me anymore as I was not the owner and it would take several weeks to confirm as he would be sending the sample to the lab.
    To round things off the park owner was away at the time of the cull and didnt want to know about the bill as he was expecting a cheque from the game dealer, I tried a couple of times to get more info from the vet to no avail, needless to say I severed my links with the deer park.
    All in all a bad outing and couldnt help but think after that i should have jumped on a jcb that was onsite and buried them - but then again doing the right thing is never cheap.
    Given that your deer is a wild one the circumstances may be different, I really hope that it is as my story wouldnt encourage anybody to report a suspected disease in wild deer, please let us know the outcome,
    Thanks George

  9. #9
    No one should advocate the covering up of a notifiable disease, if it were to run away with us & our wildlife,?????
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  10. #10
    I shot a Roe buck which I suspected may be TB related , so after speaking and sending pics to a local vet who semi-comfirmed my suspicons it may be a possibility
    I then reported it , to which I was told to take samples and some one would be in touch
    that was the last I heard about it
    I hav since been told that even thou TB in deer is notifiable, it is not a legal requirement for Defra to follow it up as it is in domestic livestock
    how true this is I'm not sure,
    but carcass was disposed of in an approoved manner at my own expense

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