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Thread: Why is there no Fallow?

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member tartinjock's Avatar
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    Why is there no Fallow?

    Can someone tell me why there is no Fallow in certain areas within the UK, or specifically the Highlands? You would think that with Red, Roe and Sika being sucessful in the Highlands that Fallow would manage the transition.....

    I have heard that there has been Fallow up this far north, but I have never seen any up here. There is plenty of "Farming" areas with more than enough woodland areas also up here which seems to be favourable conditions for them as it is down south so I can't see it just down to the food available.

    Cheers

    TJ

  2. #2
    Hi TJ. You will find a good population of Fallow at Blair Athol in Perthshire, and also a small but viable population in Sutherland not far from JAYB, but not many folk are aware of this small population.

    The Fallow in this area are all Petworth cross Norway stock, and the last time I saw them they were doing reasonably well.

    Regards

    Sikamalc

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member tartinjock's Avatar
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    Cheers Bud, In all the years I have been walking around the hills and woodlands up here I have never seen them, the wife was wanting to see some as she likes the look of them I explained that I also like the look of them but that's throught the 3-12x50 mounted on my .308

    TJ

  4. #4
    It's the French connection my son , introduced by the Normans they like a slightly milder clime! Hammocks in the summer to ,loll about until the Rut , a few french belches ,glass of wine mon Cher! and they are on the job ! Scotland ! or up north. Where can you sling a hammock!!!! never mind Belch !!! that's why Sikas Whistle!!! Fxxrk its cold!
    With Global warming perhaps they will visit more.
    Regards Trapper.

  5. #5
    It does seem odd that Fallow have been in the country for nearly 1000 years yet there are still some pretty large areas where they are missing. They do not seem to move very far from the initial parks/ chases where they were initially established, especially when compared to the spread of Roe and Muntjac in recent years. It seems to me that territorial species spread their range very quickly with an increasing population. But with herding species such as Fallow as the population increases the herd gets bigger but this is not matched by anything like the same degree of range expansion.

  6. #6
    Although climate may indirectly have something to do with it I'm not sure if it is directly temperature related as fallow endure very low temperatures in many areas where they do well.

    Although they do sometimes live on farmland, fallow are basically a herding forest species and they generally need substantial blocks of preferably deciduous, or at least mixed woodland, available to them. There are populations in coniferous woodland in parts of the UK and Ireland but these are less common and seem to do less well. The most favoured type of woodland is not common in northern climes or at substantial altitude.

    Also, most (but not all) UK fallow populations originated from escaped park stock and thus, if there were no parks containing fallow in an area, then there are probably not going to be wild fallow deer in that area.

    If you look at the latest UK distribution maps you will see that there are now fallow present in most of England and Wales and in some cases this represents significant expansion in recent years.

    The only real gaps are north of a line drawn from about Lancaster to Middlesborough and apart from the Lake District there are very few large lowland woodlands in this area. The other three areas where they are present but perhaps thinner on the ground are the Fenlands of Lincolnshire and Cambridgeshire, North Devon and Staffordshire/Cheshire and again these areas are either more agricultural, upland or lighter on suitable forested areas than some others.

    In Scotland they are much thinner on the ground but the map records significant presence in Tayside, Dumfries & Galloway (2 separate populations), Strathclyde, Lothian, plus smaller and more isolated outcrops in a couple of areas in Grampian and the East Highlands.

    I would say that fallow are present in most parts of the UK that are blessed with substantial blocks of the right type of woodland and not at too high an altitude, clearly the major part of Scotland would not fall within this definition.

    For those who are interested the latest distribution maps for all species are now available on the BDS website together with the previous maps and the continuing expansion of several species is remarkable.

    I was particularly interested to see just how many more areas in Central England from the Peak District right down to the south coast now have red deer populations.

  7. #7
    Distinguished Member tartinjock's Avatar
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    Cheers Paul k, a very well put together answer, cheers.

    TJ

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