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Thread: Shooting sticks ( what type )

  1. #1

    Shooting sticks ( what type )

    Hi Guys looking to buy some shooting sticks for stalking but what do yous find best mono, bi or tri pod. Its my first set so looking for somthing to last and proberly telescopic. Thanks

  2. #2
    http://www.stoneypoint.com/

    stoneypoint are the best in my opinion.....mono/bi/tri is all about preference if you can hold steady on a mono.....happy days,less is more....

  3. #3
    4 sticks as per my earlier posts on the topic. Under a tenner from Homebase.

    http://www.thestalkingdirectory.co.u...ghlight=sticks

    Regards JCS
    Last edited by jcampbellsmith; 06-12-2011 at 13:21. Reason: added url

  4. #4
    The kits we sell aside, long time fan of the B & Q canes.

    Appreciate there are varying quality sticks out there, but from courses and guests, have yet to come across a telescopic set that was not either too fiddly, too noisy or came apart - or all three at the same time.

    Particularly if you have yet to decide whether 1,2,3 or 4 legs suit you best, they are a cheap but good way to start - that you may well end up using full time anyway.
    Last edited by Moray Outfitting; 07-12-2011 at 16:27. Reason: Missed out not!
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Fifestalker25 View Post
    Hi Guys looking to buy some shooting sticks for stalking but what do yous find best mono, bi or tri pod. Its my first set so looking for somthing to last and proberly telescopic. Thanks
    Bipod if mobile but tripod if watching and waiting from a pre planned position

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Moray Outfitting View Post
    The kits we sell aside, long time fan of the B & Q canes.

    ... snip...

    Particularly if you have yet to decide whether 1,2,3 or 4 legs suit you best, they are a cheap but good way to start - that you may well end up using full time anyway.
    Definitely try different types before you buy to see how many legs you need to feel comfortable taking a shot. I use the Stoney Point "Explorer Polecat Bipod" which I really rate.

    Stoney Point - Explorer Polecat Bipods

    Once you have worked out whether a stick, bipod, tripod or quad sticks are for you, check the weight of any that you are looking to buy, as some sets of sticks are ridiculously heavy to be carrying around. There is no point in buying a set if you are then going to leave them in the car because they are too heavy.

    Thankfully B&Q canes are nice and light (as well as cheap) to get you started

  7. #7
    I have engaged on a 'life simplification' project, involving amongst other things the shredding of a thousand loyalty cards that never give me any benefits anyway, closing savings accounts that are empty anyway, binning unused clothes, etc. etc. etc.. For shooting that involves stripping out all unnecessary gear, just down the the bare essentials that consist of quality equipment that's fast, light, and robust.

    ok ok ok,,,I know, rambling on and on...for the purpose of shooting sticks, that means two things:
    a. Roe stalking - two B&Q canes and no bipod
    b. Hill stalking - single hazel stick and bipod

    I fear some people end up dragging WAY too much stuff around, reducing mobility, increasing fatigue, increasing noise, increasing time to prepare for a shot, and worst of all, taking a lot of the enjoyment out of the sport by focusing too much on gear.

    the ability to swiftly and quietly get in position and let a round down range can be the difference between success and failure, having to set up a complex arrangement of sticks, tag-alongs, adjust for height on legs, etc. just takes too long.

    I do admit, if you are planning on static stalking, ie. sitting/standing around for extended periods and waiting for deer to show, and you're not planning on much movement, then a tripod or quad arrangement might be useful, OR if you are in an area where you canot realistically get within 100yds for standing shots (as +100m off single or twin sticks is just asking for trouble), whereas tripod or quads will probably allow you to take longer shots with more consistent bullet placement..

  8. #8
    I have recently made some cracky quad sticks. I am fortunate enought to shoot over some ground where runner beans are grown and have nicked a few of the straightest canes i could find from a pile the size of a small lorry (i don't think they will be missed).

    Anyway they are ultra light, well camoflaged and cheap. I have used M5 bolts left loose with locking nuts to bind them together and have small pieces of elastic cord between limbs to allow fast deployment. They are flexible enough also to use either together as double sticks for short range or as quads for long range.

    If anyone is interested i can post some pics.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by PKL View Post
    I stripping out all unnecessary gear, just down the the bare essentials that consist of quality equipment that's fast, light, and robust.


    a. Roe stalking - two B&Q canes and no bipod
    b. Hill stalking - single hazel stick and bipod

    I fear some people end up dragging WAY too much stuff around,
    I am with you on that.
    Hill stalking for me is light and mobile. no bags, no rifle "jewellery" (bipods, moderators etc!)
    For roe or woodland I use a two stick arrangement, with the addition of my two legs that makes four!

    most important is not what you use but how you use it.
    get comfortable opening and positioning it silently and swiftly
    practice using it.
    I use mine for rabbits a lot. scan a field with a NV mono, walk in, set up and and use a rifle mounted lamp.
    It has given me lots of time to practice different sling positions, rifle holds, ways of opening and positioning sticks, panning on a moving target/repositioning and more importantly.....taking shots.

    I find by holding the sticks in the left and having the rifle slung up or down on the right shoulder I can open and position sticks with one hand whilst simultaneously swing the rifle up with the right.

  10. #10
    The best sticks I have ever used are a pair of fox bank sticks with a quick release for instant adjustable sticks I machined a nice piece to fasten two together and some 15mm foam tops they are very light and very sturdy,atb Wayne

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