Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27

Thread: Wooden stock warping.

  1. #1

    Wooden stock warping.

    Guys,
    Has anyone had any problems with a wooden stock warping and touching the barrel? If so, how did you overcome the problem?
    I have a Steyr-Mannlicher Classic Halfstock in .243. I've had the rifle since April and has only had 25 shots through it. It has always been kept in my cabinet which is in the cupboard under the stairs and therefore the environment is stable with minimum humidity or temperature variations.
    Over the summer I've been noticing the fore end of the stock creeping closer to the barrel but up until now it hasn't touched. I got the rifle out this evening and put a till receipt between the barrel and stock at the chamber end. It slides along freely between the stock and barrel until it reaches the fore end where upon it jams and requires tugging to pull it through.
    Obviously this may cause problems with accuracy so has anyone got any tips for solving the problem? The wood is fairly slim in that area and not much to play with. Sanding may not be an option because I feel if I take anything off, the wood will continue to warp if I give it more room.
    Best Regards,
    Adrian.

    Jedward. The reason why there are two barrels on a shotgun.

  2. #2
    a. was your rifle leaning at an angle with pressure on the barrel? wood doesn't just 'move' in stable conditions..are the action screws tight?
    otherwise,,
    b. Get a gunsmith to straighten it
    c. buy a decent synthetic stock as a replacement
    b. chop the fore end and replace with a new rosewood one, or similar ...on that thought, is there a white plastic 'spacing' around the fore end? has the glue come loose letting it bend upwards?

  3. #3
    Adrian. Simple, I sold the Sauer 90 and replaced it with a Ruger. Regards JCS

  4. #4
    If the rifle was bought brand new it might be a lack of proper seasoning in the wood. Discuss it with the vendor

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by PKL View Post
    a. was your rifle leaning at an angle with pressure on the barrel? wood doesn't just 'move' in stable conditions..are the action screws tight?
    otherwise,,
    b. Get a gunsmith to straighten it
    c. buy a decent synthetic stock as a replacement
    b. chop the fore end and replace with a new rosewood one, or similar ...on that thought, is there a white plastic 'spacing' around the fore end? has the glue come loose letting it bend upwards?
    Thank you for your replies so far Gents. To answer PKL's questions above........

    a. The rifle is stored upright and with no angle to put pressure on the barrel. The foam spacers in my cabinet are low and actually support the stock so the barrel has no weight bearing on it. All screws appear tight, there is no movement where there shouldn't be any.
    b. What does this involve?
    c. Noooo way can I get a crappy placcy stock!!!! (No offence meant to those who have synthetic stocks! ) Personal preference - I like a piece of wood on my guns!
    d. No plastic spacer as far as I know, there is nothing after the barrel leaves the action. The stock touches before the rosewood end so not sure if it's anything to do with that........?

    I spoke to the seller earlier and I'll take it back for them to look at.
    Best Regards,
    Adrian.

    Jedward. The reason why there are two barrels on a shotgun.

  6. #6
    One of the wonderful things (to me and the work of the Devil to those who favour synthetic stocks) about wood is that no matter how old it is, it's still 'alive'.

    There are two possibilities and it can sometimes be very hard to work out which it is. The first is that the stock is moving (i.e. what is often called warping) and the second is that it is localised swelling in the area of the barrel. The problem is that the remedy in each case is exactly opposite.

    If the stock is moving, it is because there is a difference in moisture content. It's not always so simple to work out in complex situations, but basically the outside of the curve is 'wetter' than the inside. That difference can be caused by heat removing moisture or by moisture being added. The good news is that it is always reversable.

    I would expect that the barrel side of the stock in that area is more permeable than the other side, and so regardless of how stable the moisture content is, there is a differential rate of absorption. This can be caused by pretty much anything. I've seen instances where the barrel channel was never finished, where someone has just refinished the 'easy' bits of the stock, or where I suspect that the sheer build-up of hand grease, dirt and oil did it.

    In order to get it to move back, you either need to make the side nearest the barrel wetter (obviously not when the barrel is there) or the other side drier. The fastest method (and most dangerous) is to apply heat to the side away from the barrel, whilst the safest (although not always successful) is to increase moisture on the side nearest the barrel by removing the stock, covering the rest of the stock with something impermeable (cling film etc. or temporary finish) and placing it in a slightly more moist environment (such as washing areas).

    However, if it is localised swelling (again caused by moisture absorption at a failure of the finish in that area), the solution is to apply heat to reduce the moisture at that point - exactly the opposite remedy.

    If I had to guess, my bet would be (since you suggest that the gap progressively narrows) is that is moving. In either instance, patience and caution are your best tools - go steady.

    HTH
    Knots



    To

  7. #7
    i would take the barrel off so you dont put any pressure on the stock where the action is bolted on and put it somewhere it can dry out properly not too fast it should go back to as it was if care is taken . after its fully dry re build if it need a light sanding use a dowel to keep the channel straight after that spend time in oiling the stock inside the channel as well as the whole stock . can i ask if the stock is varnished or is it oiled as it might not have had enough oiling and treating in the first place,atb wayne

  8. #8
    Thank you for the further replies, I appreciate your thoughts and suggestions.
    Whatever moisture that is in the wood or could be causing the movement has been there prior to me purchasing the rifle. It has never been out in any wet weather or been exposed to an environment where condensation has occured. I am quite conscious to keep the gun in a stable atmosphere to avaoid any issues such has happened.
    The stock is lightly oiled, not varnished and was quite dry when I bought the gun so it has only had a very light oiling of the woodwork using CCL Gunstock Conditioning Oil when I first got it home, the apparent warping didn't become noticeable until about three months after. All other gaps, wood to metal fit has remained the same, it is just in the one area.
    I've attached a pic below to try and show the problem......
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Picture 174.jpg  
    Best Regards,
    Adrian.

    Jedward. The reason why there are two barrels on a shotgun.

  9. #9
    The old way of bedding a rifle was to have a wooden pad at the end of the barrel channel that actually puts positive pressure on the barrel. Indeed some rifles respond to this. What causes problems is inconsistency - a full bedded barrel can shoot well, a barrel that is sometimes bedded sometimes not would be more difficult.

    If its a ne rifle take it back to the dealer. If its not then problem easily solved with a bit of sandpaper and then seal the barrel channel with some stock oil / varnish.

  10. #10
    dont get a synth!
    horrible nasty plastic things with no life in them!

    sorry just read this and deleted my post. if it is new then take it back!

Similar Threads

  1. Wooden stock-maintaining.
    By Roch in forum Cleaning, Gunsmithing and Equipment Care
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-12-2011, 09:15
  2. *SOLD* Remington 700 SA wooden stock and recoil pad
    By jcampbellsmith in forum Firearms Components
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 25-07-2011, 20:06
  3. Wanted Sako 75 Wooden Stock
    By Dom in forum Firearms
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-02-2011, 18:21
  4. For Sale blaser r93 wooden stock and bolt
    By Offroad Gary in forum Firearms
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-01-2011, 17:52
  5. Wooden stock / aluminium chassis
    By Mat in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-05-2008, 19:18

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •