Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Where to aim over a running wild boar?

  1. #1

    Where to aim over a running wild boar?

    Hello, there is some kind of rule of thumb to aim over a running wild hog and hit the vitals??
    Supposing a 308 or above calibre centre fire rifle...

    Regards!

  2. #2
    Depending on speed and distance. For usual 40-50m running boar I aim at the end of the snout, the bullet then goes behind the ear or shoulder. If running really fast or further out you have to give more lead.


  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Torbay View Post
    Hello, there is some kind of rule of thumb to aim over a running wild hog and hit the vitals??
    Supposing a 308 or above calibre centre fire rifle...

    Regards!
    This will keep you on your toes.

    http://www.hegering-schwelm.de/dieja...hner/index.php

    The first variable is the distance, the second the boar's speed and the third the bullet speed.

  4. #4
    Thanks for the answers!!, this video could help too



    Quote Originally Posted by glogin View Post
    Depending on speed and distance. For usual 40-50m running boar I aim at the end of the snout, the bullet then goes behind the ear or shoulder. If running really fast or further out you have to give more lead.

  5. #5
    Account Suspended
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Bonnie Scotland
    Posts
    3,447
    Quote Originally Posted by barongcw View Post
    This will keep you on your toes.

    http://www.hegering-schwelm.de/dieja...hner/index.php

    The first variable is the distance, the second the boar's speed and the third the bullet speed.
    Good graphic of "deflection" shooting as WW2 fighter pilots called it. The trick is not to aim at the animal but to aim at the place where the animal will be so both it and the bullet arrive there at the same moment.

    In clay pigeon parlance, "the ambush shot". Mr. Churchill (of the gun making company of that name) would not have approved

    Personally, I find it far too deliberate. You hesitate and miss. A smooth, swing through, reaction shot is more instinctive and you don't tend to hesitate.

    In game shooting parlance; Bum... Belly... Beak-Bang. Much closer to Mr Churchills preferred "shoulder-look-see-shoot" type of mount&swing shot.

    The "mount" is everything for this swing shot... So, your gun really needs to "fit"

  6. #6
    Account Suspended
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Bonnie Scotland
    Posts
    3,447
    Quote Originally Posted by Torbay View Post
    Hello, there is some kind of rule of thumb to aim over a running wild hog and hit the vitals??
    Supposing a 308 or above calibre centre fire rifle...

    Regards!
    I can't tell what "rules" might work for you but one usual piece of advice that seems to help a lot of people is: swing through to the snout and if you've acquired your target correctly and your gun fits, make it go bang just as you get to the end of the snout. If you do this smoothly and confidently with a well fitting gun (ie. without jittery hesitation or too much "thinking") the bullet will tend to connect well for a clean kill.

    Just don't try and "learn" a whole lot of rules... that way lies misery.

  7. #7
    The first time I tried the running deer target at the BSRC, the target looked like I'd been using a shotgun, it was awful. I wasn't mounting properly, was spending time trying to acquire the deer target through the scope, wasn't swinging smoothly, and was doing so too fast when I did. I was sort of trying to replicate what I do for clay or game shooting, although I'm not very good at that! Actually because a bullet is so much faster than a string of shot, you need much less lead. Anyway, the chap who was operating the target told me what I should be doing, and since then I've been doing just fine. But it takes a bit of practice. It is a bit more deliberate than shooting clays or game.

  8. #8
    Account Suspended
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Bonnie Scotland
    Posts
    3,447
    Quote Originally Posted by Pine Marten View Post
    The first time I tried the running deer target at the BSRC, the target looked like I'd been using a shotgun, it was awful. I wasn't mounting properly, was spending time trying to acquire the deer target through the scope, wasn't swinging smoothly, and was doing so too fast when I did. I was sort of trying to replicate what I do for clay or game shooting, although I'm not very good at that! Actually because a bullet is so much faster than a string of shot, you need much less lead. Anyway, the chap who was operating the target told me what I should be doing, and since then I've been doing just fine. But it takes a bit of practice. It is a bit more deliberate than shooting clays or game.
    Aim small, miss small? As Mel Gibson (that star shot) famously said... and he did get off with the rather lovely Ms Richardson, so I give him some credit... I mean who else but movie stars get to snog hunnies for a legitimate living?.... Respect!

    But... What did "the chap" tell you to do? ... I'm sure it's not just me... I think we're all keen to know now.
    Last edited by Tamus; 02-10-2012 at 14:32.

  9. #9
    Mostly it was to do with smaller movements during the mount. In the ready position, the left hand is holding the fore-end in front, somewhere a bit below shoulder height. The stock is somehwere around the hip. When the moving target presents itself, raise the stock into the shoulder, pivoting around the left hand, which means that you have almost immediate target acquisition. After that, it's matching the speed of the target and tracking it, and in the case of this one, aiming at a point midway up the chest and just ahead of it.

    Really it was about economy of movement.

  10. #10
    Account Suspended
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Bonnie Scotland
    Posts
    3,447
    Quote Originally Posted by Pine Marten View Post
    Mostly it was to do with smaller movements during the mount. In the ready position, the left hand is holding the fore-end in front, somewhere a bit below shoulder height. The stock is somehwere around the hip. When the moving target presents itself, raise the stock into the shoulder, pivoting around the left hand, which means that you have almost immediate target acquisition. After that, it's matching the speed of the target and tracking it, and in the case of this one, aiming at a point midway up the chest and just ahead of it.

    Really it was about economy of movement.

    So following on from the very good "at-rest-but-ready" advice would that be? ....

    smooth, firm, precise mount 2,3..... (looking for firm shoulder socket position and good cheek weld here ladies and gents)
    weight on forward foot 2,3..... (both eyes open)
    swing to acquire 2,3... and start to swing through 2,3... (keeping aim small, of course and still keeping both eyes open... please!)
    and Bang! (on reaching end of snout) 2,3..

    The "follow though" being the last "2,3" count and vital to maintaining the smooth pendulum effect and auto self-correct for speed of beast.

    Funnily enough, I never did ballet at school but I find good shooters are light on their toes just like dancers... Hence the notation above.

Similar Threads

  1. Wanted Wild Boar
    By killer in forum Wild Boar Opportunities
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-12-2011, 15:51
  2. Wanted wild boar
    By Scots_stalker in forum Wild Boar Opportunities
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 29-11-2011, 18:51
  3. Running Boar Practise Range
    By Tamus in forum Wild Boar
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-11-2011, 22:54
  4. Running boar simulator
    By Conor1 in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-03-2011, 13:30
  5. Benelli 8 shot with aim point sight for Driven Boar
    By Trufflehunting in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 26-03-2010, 19:12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •