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Thread: oiling a stock

  1. #1

    oiling a stock

    is it possible to over oil a wooden stock can i just keep going and going at it?

  2. #2
    Yes, you can put too much on - I know from personal experience
    The wood has a limit too how much it can absorb.

  3. #3
    how do you know when its had enough teabag?

  4. #4
    LOL - not sure! I had stripped the stock down to bare wood, and then put about seven applications on; this left it feeling slightly tacky. Thinking back, two or three layers would probably have been fine.

  5. #5
    someone else said it goes tacky but i havent had this at all. just been rubbing it in well until it almost burns my hand with the heat then leaving it at least 30 mins before doing it again

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by teabag_46 View Post
    LOL - not sure! I had stripped the stock down to bare wood, and then put about seven applications on; this left it feeling slightly tacky. Thinking back, two or three layers would probably have been fine.
    Too much too fast is my guess.
    My little CZ American has over 20 coats of red root oil and twice that many of stock oil, finish is dry and smooth, and has proved very hard wearing as well as being easy to repair once it gets a few scratches.

    Neil.

  7. #7
    is it best to apply oil to hand and then rub into stock neil? thats how i do it and its smooth too just wondering how much i can give it as id like to look after it as much possible when its not in a field getting covered in crap etc. cheers

  8. #8
    Ziggy,

    Whether you keep going with it depends on the level of finish you want to achieve. The stock will absorb oil quickly during the first few coats. After a while the wood becomes saturated and at that stage each application of oil is adding another layer on top of the existing layers.

    When you're building up the layers you need to let the oil dry and harden completely before each coat. If you don't you'll get a tacky finish which won't harden. If you take your time with it you can build up a deep finish which looks like glass. The best London guns are finished in this way and they look stunning. The downside is it takes months to achieve that level of finish because of the drying time.

    The other thing to remember about oil finishing is "less is more". A dab on your finger is enough. Rub it in with the palm of your hand and don't be afraid to get it hot with the friction.

    It's a labour of love, but the results can be stunning.

    Cheers,

    Bob

  9. #9
    thanks bob thats almost how ive been doing it but maybe not leaving it long enough to dry properly. im leaving the stock off for a week or two so will just a add a couple of coats every couple of days maybe?

  10. #10
    As Bob says, a (very) little at a time.
    I found once the first few coats were on it was a case of 1 or 2 coats a day.
    The important bit is the rubbing it in, you must develope some heat preferably enough to warm the stock up.
    The warmer it gets the thinner the oil, and the faster it soaks in, and then the faster the solvents in it evaporate, which
    is the bit that makes the oil dry hard, mine is so hard you can use fine scotch brite to remove scratches, then T-Cut to re-polish.

    Neil.

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