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Thread: dog for the recreational hunter

  1. #1

    dog for the recreational hunter

    i have been doing alot of reading on hear about the different dog breeds and their specific functions
    i would love to see myself getting more involved in the tracking end of things
    for me ,watching your dog work, and do what it was bred to do, is alot of the thrill

    reading about the hanoverians and the bavarians ....
    are these dogs suited to the casual hunter/tracker?

    or would they be wasted on them
    id like to know what people on hear, who may have or may not, use these kind of dogs
    and what do they reckon?

  2. #2
    It depends on how you look at it there are die hard supporters of the breeds eg BARON who dose not work his dog that regularly but because he does it the German way he feels laying tracks etc that he is suitable. Gazza is out with his dog stalking 3 times a week but because he does not follow the plan he is not that suitable. For me if you can give the dog regular work or lay regular tracks why not.

  3. #3
    I pulled this little bit from an email sent to me as a proof before it was printed in one of the shooting mags.

    Kim has 10 years’ tracking experience and is part of a group of ‘pro’ trackers, Team Nordjyden, called out by stalkers in Denmark , where it is a legal requirement for the stalker to follow up a wounded animal. Kim has two dogs: a Hanovarian????? mountain hound and a Labrador, both of which accompanied him on his visit to the UK . But he makes the point that here in the UK, unless you are doing 15 or more hill/red deer stalks a year, there is absolutely no need to get a specialist ‘deer dog’. “Most recreational stalkers simply won’t be able to give a mountain hound enough tracking work,” says Kim. “A lab is a better all-rounder that won’t get frustrated if you only end up doing a few proper follow-ups a year. But remember, not all dogs can or should be sniffer dogs. A dog that does not have the urge to follow a trail will never be good at it, in which case you’re better off working to that dog’s strengths, rather than spend 10 years being depressed at your lack of success.”

    Tony

  4. #4
    In my mind working breeds of dog are best kept and are happiest in an environment whereby they can be trained and used for the purpose or purposes they have been developed over generations to carry out. This ideal has not been followed in many working breeds and we now have a distinct "split" between working and show strains. In the gundog world there are a good few breeds that have adapted to be family pets with probably the labrador and spaniel being the best examples. Social, easy going, relatively easily trained, non demanding and rarely aggressive dogs that fit in well with a family life. As the likes of the BMH and HS become more popular there is a genuine concern with breeders of these dogs that they also may loose or be bred away from their origins. I own a BMH and he is a very friendly (once he knows you) and loyal dog. I can see how his breed could be adapted to being a pet or show dog and so the working genetic not being upper most in the wants of the breeder dimishes and is eventually bred out.
    Somewhere in between the out and out working dog and the show or entirely pet dog has developed dogs that in the main are the family pet but the owner is willing to spend the time to train the dog for the purpose for which it was bred and the dog doubles as the family pet and a weekend gundog/stalking dog/sheep dog. I believe that in this Country a sport of tracking dogs may well develop and that persons will buy a BMH or HS not to track deer but to take part in this sport. If you go through the various threads on tracking dogs you will note that there are some on the forum who are extremely dedicated to the origins of these dogs and their exceptional abiliy to cold track and there are those who like myself look on my dog as a "general" deer dog and in the main I am looking for a dog I can take out stalking, will indicate deer and will track and locate wounded beasts following shot (hot scents). Developing a tracking sport may well be an excellent addition to how we use these specialised dogs in the UK.
    In your own case as a recreational stalker and from this I take this phrase as meaning a now and again stalker I would be looking at a labrador from working stock that you can train in good obedience as a family pet but also train him/her to track wounded deer, be a stalking companion so that when you do go stalking you have a dog to take with you. He may not attain a vast amount of practical experience but you can train in as realistic situations as you can manage so that he is an asset in your hunting.

  5. #5
    Gazza,

    agree 100% with what you have writen.

  6. #6
    thanks for the info lads
    to clear up recreational stalking
    i like to get out stalking twice a week or as often as i can

    starting from sep through to feb
    i know over there ye get a longer season than we do in ireland

  7. #7
    I have a BMH and im a recreational stalker. I am lucky and manage to get out to various places stalking in my 2 weeks leave from the rig. I do cold tracks when time allows with him, and find these dogs are very switched on when out stalking, he is only 2 years old and just loves it, a bit to eager at times when the shot is fired to get to the deer but he will learn. Great company for the mrs when im away, spoilt rotten by then and i have to pick up the pieces when i come back home. The welcome i get makes it worthwhile (from the dog).

  8. #8
    I would say get a lab,Gazza has it spot on
    A lab can help you in numerous other shooting,retrieving,etc
    Whereas BMH/HS are dedicated to deer only,if your shooting enough deer get one

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  9. #9
    I agree with the last answers. But there are other suitables breeds for a "recreational hunter" than the lab. I am thinking about GWP, Teckel, ...
    I consider myself a "recreational hunter", but also keen on rough shooting. I own a Teckel for a year, mostly for blood tracking but will also use it for rough shooting in the future. Been training with blood since 3 months old, 2-3 times per week. Litle by litle introducing in real tracks with good results so far.
    I heard that many lines of "beauty conntest" Teckels in UK, not use for hunting/shooting. But find a working line and you will not be disapointed. The Bavarians I know are specialists in blood tracking, and used for >30 real tracks per year. Again, don't forget the GWP.

    Cheers.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by wallace grant View Post
    I have a BMH and im a recreational stalker. I am lucky and manage to get out to various places stalking in my 2 weeks leave from the rig. I do cold tracks when time allows with him, and find these dogs are very switched on when out stalking, he is only 2 years old and just loves it, a bit to eager at times when the shot is fired to get to the deer but he will learn. Great company for the mrs when im away, spoilt rotten by then and i have to pick up the pieces when i come back home. The welcome i get makes it worthwhile (from the dog).
    Hi Wallace - - I'm a bit concerned that he's getting too spoilt on your couple of weeks offshore. He knows me fine - - so - - big-hearted as I am I'll be happy to look after him during that period!
    On a serious note, from what I've seen he's a lovely dog in all respects, a very alert and silent companion in the woods and friendly with it. It takes a special dog to be a spoilt pet for two weeks and then change into working mode as and when required - - If your example is anything to go by I would highly recommend them.

    JR

    PS - - Hope he's gonna be trotting along here soon ?

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