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Thread: DSC1 revision - CWD sexes

  1. #1

    DSC1 revision - CWD sexes

    All,
    I have been revising my DSC1 using the BDS disc. One hitch I am hitting is correctly determining the sex of CWD in the visual recognition test. I know that males have long tusks, but are there any other features that can be used to separate the sexes (I understand this may be a silly question, as this is why they have the same season)

    Cheers

    Adam
    Beretta Silver Pigeon 20 Bore
    Browing X-Bolt Stainless Stalker - 30-06
    Countryside Management Diary - http://www.leagueofwrath.co.uk/cmblog/

  2. #2
    I just completed my DSC1 and really, there aren't any distinguishing features apart from the tusks. Otherwise, it's behavioural. In the test though, all the photos were clear and unambiguous, they're not trying to catch you out. As you said, the fact that they look the same is acknowledged by the law.

  3. #3
    Hi Adam,

    Pine Marten is right on all counts. The distinguishing feature is the tusks and the DSC questions are clear and unambiguous.

    It can be very difficult to learn about deer identification which is why I created my training website. As well as holding all of the questions and answers, there are over 100 pictures set up so that you can learn quite easily which deer is which, and you can run a 'mock dsc' which presents sample questions and slides. You can try it for free at www.dsctraining.org but it sounds like your learning is already well advanced by using the BDS disc - well done so far!

    Whatever learning route you use, good luck with your test when you take it

    Regards, Steve

  4. #4
    Thanks for the advice chaps - I am pretty good on the recognition (getting 18-20 out of 20 every time) it's just a couple of the pictures on the BDS disc are rather tricky to figure out if the tusks are there or not and I was wondering if there was any other method of discerning between the two. There are easy pics on there as well where the tusks are very obvious - I guess it just hammers home the point that they are tricky to tell apart.

    Steve - I've had a look at your website and it is superb, very well put together and well worded. I particularly like the highlighting of the identification pictures showing the key features to look for on each species. I am indeed getting there and hoping to get the money together to do my DSC1 in the next couple of months, just got to sell the old motorbike and I should be away!

    Cheers

    Adam
    Beretta Silver Pigeon 20 Bore
    Browing X-Bolt Stainless Stalker - 30-06
    Countryside Management Diary - http://www.leagueofwrath.co.uk/cmblog/

  5. #5
    If you can't clearly see the tusks assume it is a female!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by NellyT View Post
    If you can't clearly see the tusks assume it is a female!
    Heh! Yes, I had been using that logic and then came unstuck when the test on the BDS disc said "No!"
    Beretta Silver Pigeon 20 Bore
    Browing X-Bolt Stainless Stalker - 30-06
    Countryside Management Diary - http://www.leagueofwrath.co.uk/cmblog/

  7. #7
    There is no clear way to sex CWD. At a distance even females can look like they have teeth, due to the white hair under their lower jaw, that in certain light can look like teeth, besides even the females can sport small teeth sometimes.
    If it is early in the season and you see a group of 3 together this can often be a doe with two young, so be careful. However during the rut period the males are fairly easy to see by their body language and the fact that they are chasing the doe's. The rut in general is around Christmas time.

    If you can see the teeth then good, if not one trick to look for is when they are feeding. If they look your way and the grass or food they are eating stick out either side of their mouth this is often the sign of a good buck as the teeth can get in the way while they are feeding. Good optics, spotting scopes are often used by many who stalk CWD on a regular basis.
    Last edited by sikamalc; 22-02-2012 at 16:11.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by sikamalc View Post
    There is no clear way to sex CWD. At a distance even females can look like they have teeth, due to the white hair under their lower jaw, that in certain light can look like teeth, besides even the females can sport small teeth sometimes.
    If it is early in the season and you see a group of 3 together this can often be a doe with two young, so be careful. However during the rut period the males are fairly easy to see by their body language and the fact that they are chasing the doe's. The rut in general is around Christmas time.

    If you can see the teeth then good, if not one trick to look for is when they are feeding. If they look your way and the grass or food they are eating stick out either side of their mouth this is often the sign of a good buck as the teeth can get in the way while they are feeding. Good optics, spotting scopes are often used by many who stalk CWD on a regular basis.
    One of the more obvious pictures on the BDS disc is a doe with two youngsters in tow, the tricky ones are exactly as you say - trying to work out if that's a patch of chin fur or a tooth even more tricky when the picture shows one with a big clump of food in it's mouth that is covering the tusks

    Interesting note on body language and another good reason why getting out there is better than all the pictures you can cram on a CD Cheers for the advice
    Beretta Silver Pigeon 20 Bore
    Browing X-Bolt Stainless Stalker - 30-06
    Countryside Management Diary - http://www.leagueofwrath.co.uk/cmblog/

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by adjman View Post
    Heh! Yes, I had been using that logic and then came unstuck when the test on the BDS disc said "No!"
    I know the picture you mean!! With several evenings going through the disc though things are getting much better.

    Some good pointers Sikmalc, thanks

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Pine Marten View Post
    I just completed my DSC1 and really, there aren't any distinguishing features apart from the tusks. Otherwise, it's behavioural. In the test though, all the photos were clear and unambiguous, they're not trying to catch you out. As you said, the fact that they look the same is acknowledged by the law.
    I may be wrong here, but this is possibly the main reason why a season was applied to CWD. Many were being shot in late summer early autumn, with I would guess, many CWD being seen in groups of 2 to 4 beasts together. The problem being is that at this time of year many are doe's with that years young, with deer being shot thinking one out of the group is a buck

    They are by their very nature the hardest to sex in the field in my opinion, except during the rut, when with experience one can, with a certain amount of care see which is a Buck at some distance.
    Last edited by sikamalc; 22-02-2012 at 18:49.

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