Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: flame bluing

  1. #1

    flame bluing

    just doing some flame bluing of my action screws - they look awesome! however, the swivel studs don't come out with the same beautiful blue, turns straw, then indigo blue, then quickly back to silver..are they a type of steel that won't blue well perhaps?

  2. #2
    My first guess would be a temperature control issue - straw is about 230C going to deep blue about 300C, but it often goes back to its initial appearance before red at about 400C. If your heat is getting hotter with use, or you are getting more confident/impatient, or the mass is less, then you could miss it. Try putting it in some clean sand (with a little bit showing so you can see the colour) and heating the sand - the extra mass makes it easier to control.

    Alternatively, the studs may be cast (and noticeably harder) and/or possibly have a surface treatment preventing oxidation. You could try sanding/polishing off the surface before trying again, but if they are too hard, I've found they won't flame blue (but will rust blue really well).

    Good luck,
    Knots
    Last edited by Knottaclu; 19-03-2012 at 00:31.

  3. #3
    very good advice, thank you indeed sir.

  4. #4
    I'm sure charcoal is involved some where along the line. maybe try heating the screw up to a red heat then letting them cool in a bed of charcoal make sure you cover then up.... is there nothing on the internet that might help?

    The effect is very nice.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason View Post
    I'm sure charcoal is involved some where along the line.
    I think you're getting a bit confused by the many different ways of bluing. Charcoal is used in some of the most arcane bluing processes whereby charcoal/bone meal/burnt leather/Branston Pickle/Granny's old bloomers/etc. are heated with the work piece in a temperature/atmosphere controlled environment. This was most famously used by Colt for their Carbona process, but a lot of the old boys used to have their own recipes which were closely guarded.

    The OP is talking about flame bluing - one of the simplest ways of entraining oxide on the surface. It is normally used on small parts (a lot of clock hands used to be done that way) and you have to be careful as it is very easy to lose the temper on small parts unless you quench quickly.
    Last edited by Knottaclu; 20-03-2012 at 08:26.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason View Post
    I'm sure charcoal is involved some where along the line. maybe try heating the screw up to a red heat then letting them cool in a bed of charcoal make sure you cover then up.... is there nothing on the internet that might help?

    The effect is very nice.
    You may be thinking of colour case hardening, lovely finish - spectacular to do!

    The 'flame' colouring can be done in a kiln with appropriate control to set temperature so that you do not miss the colour that you require.

  7. #7
    flame blued my sling swivel studs last night and quenched in boiled linseed oil - they look amazing! love it,,now I can't find enough stuff to flame blue! LOL...

    question though - can you flame blue stainless steel or does it not get the right deep blue and red colours?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by PKL View Post
    flame blued my sling swivel studs last night and quenched in boiled linseed oil - they look amazing! love it,,now I can't find enough stuff to flame blue! LOL...

    question though - can you flame blue stainless steel or does it not get the right deep blue and red colours?
    Answered your own question there!

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by j0e_bl0ggs View Post
    Answered your own question there!
    I'm not sure they are stainless steel actually, I polished off the black finish and flame blued, I think the stainless one's come in silver/stainless colour only?...suss...

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by PKL View Post
    can you flame blue stainless steel or does it not get the right deep blue and red colours?
    Stainless steel covers a lot of metal with different characteristics. Very broadly speaking, if it is magnetic, you can polish off the chromium oxide, and flame blue (albeit with considerably higher temperatures). The colours acheived are a bit different and often lose their vibrancy - also be aware that in certain circumstances, heating to the necessary temperatures can affect the 'stainlessness'.

Similar Threads

  1. shotgun bluing ARE THESE THE BARRELS I SENT ???
    By bobjs in forum Equipment & Accessories
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-03-2012, 14:51
  2. recommended rifle bluing
    By Glendine in forum Cleaning, Gunsmithing and Equipment Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 15-02-2012, 22:40
  3. Bluing or gun paints?
    By chickenman in forum Cleaning, Gunsmithing and Equipment Care
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 18-10-2011, 16:17
  4. Barrel bluing
    By jimbo123p in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 18-09-2011, 12:21
  5. Old Flame
    By Milly in forum Jokes & Funnies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-01-2011, 05:57

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •