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Thread: DRY FIREING.

  1. #1

    DRY FIREING.

    hi i,m wondering if dry fireing will help to cure my habit of blinking on the shot,i,m currently using a unmoderated 243. any help appreciated.
    th scudd

  2. #2

    Dry firing

    Hi Scudd, an un moderated .22 rimmy is a good starting point, plenty of rounds! Concentrate on breathing and follow through with eyes open.
    Not sure dry firing a good thing for your rifle.
    ATB
    Old Man

  3. #3
    I think it would certainly help - might find your shooting improves when using hearing protection, at least whilst practicing.

    Best cure is probably a moderator, tames the 243 right down.

  4. #4
    SD Regular willie_gunn's Avatar
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    Scudd

    I have used snap caps to good effect, but more to get used to squeezing the trigger and to work on my firing position than to cure a 'blink'. The downside is that you know with snap caps that the rifle won't go bang, but the good news it that it lets you focus much more on what you are doing.

    See http://www.midwayuk.com/apps/eproduc...eItemID=367282

    Going back to practicing with an air rifle is also useful.

    willie_gunn

  5. #5
    Dry firing using snap caps can be very beneficial and limited dry firing of a centrefire rifle shouldn't damage it. However don't dry fire a .22 as being a rimfire the firing pin can contact the edge of the chamber and cause damage in short order.
    If you could get a mate to assist one method (often used by top level competition shooters to test for flinch) is to get a friend to load for you without you seeing if a live round or snap cap has been loaded. The safety is applied and the gun passed to you while at all times it is pointed in a safe direction downrange, you then take the shot. If you snatch the shot and it is only a snap cap you start to look a little silly.
    I have been advised in the past that regular practise with an old fashioned spring powered air rifle, not a modern recoiless PCP, is much more beneficial than practise with a .22 rimfire.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57
    Dry firing using snap caps can be very beneficial and limited dry firing of a centrefire rifle shouldn't damage it. However don't dry fire a .22 as being a rimfire the firing pin can contact the edge of the chamber and cause damage in short order.
    If you could get a mate to assist one method (often used by top level competition shooters to test for flinch) is to get a friend to load for you without you seeing if a live round or snap cap has been loaded. The safety is applied and the gun passed to you while at all times it is pointed in a safe direction downrange, you then take the shot. If you snatch the shot and it is only a snap cap you start to look a little silly.
    I have been advised in the past that regular practise with an old fashioned spring powered air rifle, not a modern recoiless PCP, is much more beneficial than practise with a .22 rimfire.
    A good training technique is to get a friend to help you; get them to load the rifle for you, they can be beside you, you just need to turn your head away when they load and they can load a snap cap or a live round once you have flinched a few times with nothing in the chamber you soon focus and when the round is there the technique will be correct this technique works well for pistol and shotgun shooting as well.

    Dave

  7. #7
    Get yourself a box of orange clay pigeons and some ammo and find somewhere safe and suitable to shoot at the clays in realistic field positions and distances. Try and see if you can watch the shot hit the clay. This will show you what you are doing wrong and help you correct for it as it is easy to see hits on the bright orange clay and so you can work out if you are closing your eyes etc. Hits on the very centre of the clay knock out the centre disk while leaving the outer rim intact so you also get a good idea of real world accuracy in practical terms.

    To be honest I suspect that maybe everyone blinks when they fire a rifle. I remember seeing some TV a long time back where top level cricketers were saying that the most important thing was to keep the eyes open as you hit the ball. Slow mo footage then showed that every one of them blinked as they hit the ball. So, what you need to watch for is if you are closing your eyes before you release the shot, or keeping them closed afterwards. I don't think a quick blink is going to be a big problem and I think slow mo footage would show even the best shot doing it.

  8. #8
    scudd
    a couple of things i found that helped cure me with blinking
    i lightened the trigger pull ,so i was not conciously waiting for the bang because of a heavy trigger
    i also put a moderator on ,so it reduced kick back , this was the major problem and praticed live firing in the situations i would expect to be in while out stalking
    ie: off sticks and freehand, but not really worrying about accurracy as much , more about just hitting the target and getting the feel of firing multiple shots
    it seems to makes you more comfortable in your self as you are not thinking to much about that one single shot and trying to hit the bull on a target
    last thing,
    stop thinking about it to much
    i still flinch a little with my 30-06 , as i kicks like a mule with out a mod on
    that was the main reason for getting a mod for it, i still flinch a little with it but not all the time, only while firing a few practice shots
    regards
    stone

  9. #9

    stone

    Stone
    I had exactly the same with the 30-06. On targets I am waiting for the bang and struggle to hold the sight picture. On deer I am so focussed on the target that I dont have a problem with either. Lesson for me was to concentrate much harder on the targets and I also lightened the trigger.

  10. #10
    A match stick would cure your blinking.................
    basil.

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