Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Flat shooting 308 ammo

  1. #1

    Flat shooting 308 ammo

    I made up my mind to get a lightweight 308 stalking rifle. 2.9kg + roedale mod + 6x42 Zeiss scope. Ready to start at 3.6kg.
    Has anybody made up 308 ammo with the 130 grain Barnes TSX ? I know there is the 123 grain Sako round, but I like a bullet wich can break both shoulders of a red deer and still only have an exit wound from 2 or 3 times calibre size. I might get the Sako ammo for training and even for Hinds, but I like a good strong bullet for use on game. The 308 with these light bullets seems almost as flat shooting as a 270. How flat can you get the 150 grain bullets shooting in a 308? This compared to the 270.

  2. #2
    Hales,

    There's "flat" and there's "flatter" and it is for the stalker to determine for himself whether it makes enough difference to worry about.

    The first question you need to ask is over what distance you are talking about. This is important because it makes very little odds whether a given cartridge is 3" flatter than another at 400 yards because your crosshairs subtend more than that at that distance and quite apart from aiming errors, at a error in range estimation of 10-20 yards will make more difference than that.

    If you are shooting at long range then wind-deflection is more important than drop because you can much more easily hold-over or dial in for drop whereas wind is variable and difficult to measure. This last is more an argument in favour of high BC and therefore heavy bullets within a calibre than a difference between calibres but the point is that a light bullet is not always the best idea for long range shooting.

    High BC heavy bullets also retain velocity and hence energy better than light bullets, enabling them to often overcome the intial velocity advantage of lighter bullets eventually.

    If I had to pick a long range load and rifle from my little collection I would use the 200gr Nosler Accubonds at around 2650 fps from my 30.06. According to Nosler this bullet opens up well on game at impact speeds of above 1900 fps which according to my calculations means that it should retain that velocity to 500 yards at least, where it will be carrying about the same energy as a .243 develops at the muzzle. From a 200 yard zero it would drop about 46" or 26 clicks on my scope with 1.6" of deflection per mph of wind.

    Compare this to the figures for a 125gr Nosler Ballistic tip load I have for foxes. The velocity is 3300 fps at the muzzle which drops to 1900 at around 550 yards for about the energy as .223 at the muzzle.The drop is about 44" or 26 clicks on my scope with 2.9" of deflection per mph of wind.

    As can be seen there are virtually no disadvantages at long range to using heavier bullets.

    In the case of the specific calibres you've mentioned the difference in drop between a a .308 150grain bullet loaded to 2850fps and a .270 130 grain bullet loaded to 3000fps, both zeroed to 1.5" high at 100 yards, is all of about 1.5" at 300 yards.

    You can reverse the .270's advantage by selecting aerodynamic bullets for the 308 and blunter ones for the .270 if you really want as well.

  3. #3
    Hi Hales,

    I shoot .308 Win myself, but never tried the Barnes TSX so can't comment on that specific bullet, sorry.

    I don't worry too much about getting rounds to shoot flat. I see it as more important that they shoot consistently, and group well. Consistency is accuracy. If I know with certainty that a round will impact high or low by a certain amount at a given distance, then I don't need flat trajectories, but can simply hold over/under as required. We're not talking rainbow trajectories here. I tend to shoot with 150gn which zeroed for 150 yds means 0.8" high at 100yds, and 2.1" low at 200 yards. As you can see all these are well within a 3" kill radius for an engine room shot. I try to use the same ammo for range work as I will use hunting, because that breeds confidence in the ammo's performance, as well as the rifle's zero.

  4. #4
    I agree with the aboth. I changed from 140 too 120 bullets as thought they were flatter in my 6.5. It is only recently I have learnt from folk who know a hell of alot more than me that there is more too it than bullet wieght. It was proven to me that at hunting ranges it wasnt worth dropping to 120s and that the 140s wtih a better co.eff. were in fact shooting the same or better with the right load development, not only that they would have far better knock down power, remember that it also has alot to do with bullet construction too. It was also proven to me the the 140 bullets out to extreme distances were alot flatter.

  5. #5
    In fact I'am a heavy for caliber, bullet, man. More a 30-06 man than a 308 man. But as I want a light rifle I thought the 308 would be more recoil friendly. I plan to get a Howa barelled action, have it shortened to 20" and put one of Edi's stocks on it. My knee starts giving me serious trouble due to being abused by heavy work most of my life. Also have a bad back due to the same heavy work. Before my knee colapses completely, I would like to get once, at least, after hinds in the highlands. I also want to use the rifle to practise a bit on the range. I already have a 7x64. In Belgium the moderator is illegal, so recoil will be harder and the 308 will probably be more adapted in a light rifle. For woodland stalking I would use a 180 grain bullet without hesitating, but thought the lighter bullets would have been more forgiving if I misjudged the distance in the highlands. So maybe I could go for a good 150 grain BT bullet or even the 150 KS from RWS.

  6. #6
    Hales,

    Try 125gn Nosler BT backed by some varget, the load is out there and if you zero @ 200m you will never need to hold over at stalking distances. This and they are fecking accurate and drop everything they touch.

  7. #7
    Have a look at the cartridge knowledge section on this site http://www.ballisticstudies.com/ for .308 and scroll down to the reloading section. a lot of info there and detail of effects of Barnes 130 gn TSX as well as other bullets based on observations of the damage they cause . Going to load a few myself when I can get my hands on some.

    Bob

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Grandhubert View Post
    Hales,

    There's "flat" and there's "flatter" and it is for the stalker to determine for himself whether it makes enough difference to worry about.

    The first question you need to ask is over what distance you are talking about. This is important because it makes very little odds whether a given cartridge is 3" flatter than another at 400 yards because your crosshairs subtend more than that at that distance and quite apart from aiming errors, at a error in range estimation of 10-20 yards will make more difference than that.

    If you are shooting at long range then wind-deflection is more important than drop because you can much more easily hold-over or dial in for drop whereas wind is variable and difficult to measure. This last is more an argument in favour of high BC and therefore heavy bullets within a calibre than a difference between calibres but the point is that a light bullet is not always the best idea for long range shooting.

    High BC heavy bullets also retain velocity and hence energy better than light bullets, enabling them to often overcome the intial velocity advantage of lighter bullets eventually.

    If I had to pick a long range load and rifle from my little collection I would use the 200gr Nosler Accubonds at around 2650 fps from my 30.06. According to Nosler this bullet opens up well on game at impact speeds of above 1900 fps which according to my calculations means that it should retain that velocity to 500 yards at least, where it will be carrying about the same energy as a .243 develops at the muzzle. From a 200 yard zero it would drop about 46" or 26 clicks on my scope with 1.6" of deflection per mph of wind.

    Compare this to the figures for a 125gr Nosler Ballistic tip load I have for foxes. The velocity is 3300 fps at the muzzle which drops to 1900 at around 550 yards for about the energy as .223 at the muzzle.The drop is about 44" or 26 clicks on my scope with 2.9" of deflection per mph of wind.

    As can be seen there are virtually no disadvantages at long range to using heavier bullets.

    In the case of the specific calibres you've mentioned the difference in drop between a a .308 150grain bullet loaded to 2850fps and a .270 130 grain bullet loaded to 3000fps, both zeroed to 1.5" high at 100 yards, is all of about 1.5" at 300 yards.

    You can reverse the .270's advantage by selecting aerodynamic bullets for the 308 and blunter ones for the .270 if you really want as well.
    well said that man

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by CWY308 View Post
    Hales,

    Try 125gn Nosler BT backed by some varget, the load is out there and if you zero @ 200m you will never need to hold over at stalking distances. This and they are fecking accurate and drop everything they touch.
    +1 the business in my sako 44 or 45 grains.

    atb steve

  10. #10
    If you miss judge the distance in the Highlands on the odd windy you would be better of throwing a brick , and the short barrelled rifle would make a good crutch.

    I would suggest looking at the barrel twist so you would have the option of prefered bullet weights for your different applications , note the different zero settings and happy days .


    ATB

Similar Threads

  1. .308 Ammo
    By Richfergy in forum Ammunition, Reloading & Ballistics
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 15-03-2012, 19:17
  2. Wanted .308 factory ammo
    By BIGPETE in forum Deer Stalking Equipment
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-06-2011, 12:02
  3. .308 sub sonic ammo ?
    By bartman in forum Ammunition, Reloading & Ballistics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-05-2011, 20:52
  4. flat shooting
    By remmy243 in forum Ammunition, Reloading & Ballistics
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 31-03-2011, 22:02
  5. .308 Ammo
    By Bestman in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 13-10-2009, 07:42

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •