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Thread: Varnished stock

  1. #1

    Varnished stock

    Guys advice please.

    Got another stock for my rifle. However it is varnished and not oiled. I would prefer an oiled stock but am unsure of the process involved of stripping the varnish, how to strip and clean the checkering, etc etc etc can anyone give me an idiots guide as to how to do this ?

  2. #2
    I did a shotgun stock that came up nicely. Remove woodwork from action. Buy some paint stripper (eg Nitromoors) and follow the instructions re timing etc. I used a plastic spatula to scrape the varnish and stripper off. Had to do a couple of applications, the checkering was fiddly but using the corner of the scraper it cleaned out ok.

    Then wash in cold water and detergent to remove any remaining traces of stripper. Dry with papertowel and leave at room temp for a week. If you have any dents you can iron them out at this stage.

    Now get some very fine sandpaper/wet and dry and work down the grades. You want a mirror finish and make sure you get down to 600 grit minimum (I went to 1200 wet and dry).

    Depending on the wood (and how it looked wet) no is an opportunity to add some walnut stain to bring out the colour and grain. Follow the instructions in terms of timing. Rub down with very fine sandpaper between coats. After the last coat (think I did 3) just went over with very fine 1200. Each time you dampen the wood you raise the grain a little.

    I used the Tru Oil and did maybe 6 coats allowing it to dry between coats. *think* you go over with wire wool between but I forget now.

    Birchwood Casey Tru-Oil Gun Stock Finish Kit - Rifle | eBay

    Section 161 of the Highways Act 1980 (England & Wales) makes it an offence to discharge a firearm within 50 ft of the centre of a highway with vehicular rights without lawful authority or excuse, if as a result a user of the highway is injured, interrupted or endangered.

  3. #3
    I did as Apache above, with good results. When oiling, use your bare hands and work it well in, using the heat from your hands until it is absorbed. Then oil it: "once a day for a week, once a week for a month, then once a year". It works!

  4. #4
    I have just done a rifle stock
    rifle restoration project

    I washed the nitromors off and used an old toothbrush to scrub out chequering, lot of dirt gets in there.

    I also avoided the grain filler as had a pretty smooth finish.

    I used Philips Walnut Oil Preparation (the key is the preparation, helps it dry and give that sheen)
    Go easy on the oil on the chequering. it builds up quickly and you can't rub it in as well.
    Always add less oil than you think, its better to under oil often and re-oil areas that soak it up, than over oil and have to wait days for it to dry or worse, remove it to start again!
    3-4 drops in the palm of your hand and rubbed in will regularly do the job.

    I rubbed down the wood with some wire wool in between major oilings (was advised to use bronze wool to avoid getting rusty splinters at a later date)

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by bewsher500 View Post
    I have just done a rifle stock
    rifle restoration project

    I washed the nitromors off and used an old toothbrush to scrub out chequering, lot of dirt gets in there.

    I also avoided the grain filler as had a pretty smooth finish.

    I used Philips Walnut Oil Preparation (the key is the preparation, helps it dry and give that sheen)
    Go easy on the oil on the chequering. it builds up quickly and you can't rub it in as well.
    Always add less oil than you think, its better to under oil often and re-oil areas that soak it up, than over oil and have to wait days for it to dry or worse, remove it to start again!
    3-4 drops in the palm of your hand and rubbed in will regularly do the job.

    I rubbed down the wood with some wire wool in between major oilings (was advised to use bronze wool to avoid getting rusty splinters at a later date)
    For stripping I agree with bewsher. Once dry from the stripping I then start sanding with 1000 grade wet and dry, this is also the time to Iron the dents out. To sand steam the stock to raise the graing and sand it down, always making sure you go with the grain. After a couple of sandings I will then proceed with 0000 steel wool just like before until the woods becomes silky smooth. Always allow the wood to rest over night between steamings. Now this is crucial and will define a good job from a great job and stay away from the chequering take your time and dont rush the sanding process. I then use Trade secret oil kit, Ive found it user friendly (idiot proof instructions) and a damn good product. again do not rush take your time the longer the better finnish.


    Not my best job by far but itll give you an idea of the trade secret kit.





    This gun is a Winchester 101 and is 30 years old. The varnish was a bit tatty before I strippe it and Oiled it.


    http://www.solware.co.uk/air-pistol-...nish-Kit.shtml

    I didnt get my kit here this is a google result. I go straight to the man himself, and a gent to deal with and advice given freely.



    Nutty

  6. #6
    I was warned off the chemical approach when removing varnish, as it has the tendancy to fill the pores of the wood with gunk, chemical and moisture which make it less able to draw in the oil you then use.
    I was a little surprised by the alternative, but it worked a treat;
    The method I was shown and then used was to take a flat blunted blade (i was leant a hacksaw blade with the teeth ground off it by my gunsmith) then use this like a draw knife and bring it smoothly towards you held at right angles to the wood, this worked an absolute treat and ahd the stock and forend of my 20 bore stripped bare in about 20 minutes, fine wire wool was used around detail etc, but the finish I then got from the oil was lovely.
    I have used the chemical approach before with good results, but I am always happy to try something new and this worked very effectively and did no damage to the wood.
    ATB
    Andy

  7. #7
    how do you get the varnish out of the chequering with that though?

    Chemicals are fine so long as you dont leave them on too long and wash them off. They may actually aid the absorption of oil as they have a chemical drying effect on the wood.

    Just take a look at anyone's living room door after it has been dipped and stripped, it is bone dry, weighs three pounds less than it did when it went in and is devoid of all natural oil/moisture...hence the bit about dont leave it on your stock too long!

  8. #8
    Thanks for the advice guys. Sanded to within an inch of its life then wire wooled until itwas as smooth as glass then 4 coats of alkanet and 4 coats of rapid oil and it looks fantastic. Absolutely delighted, cheers guys.

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