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Thread: Knives

  1. #1

    Knives

    Im sure this question has been asked in the past on here, but here goes anyway...

    If money was not a barrier, what is the best gralloching knife available.
    Whats harder - carbon steel or damascus? Whats best for holding an edge etc?

    Im sure there will be some debate but id like to know your opinions.

    DA
    Last edited by Deer Assassin; 17-05-2012 at 10:31.
    Everyone is entitled to their own opinion... it's just that yours is stupid!!

  2. #2
    Money no object, a Bob Loveless drop-point hunter like this?
    http://www.lovelessknife.com/classic-drop-point/index.html
    Last edited by JabaliHunter; 17-05-2012 at 19:30.

  3. #3
    DA,


    Any steel used in knife making is a balance / compromise between edge retention and ease of sharpening. For example, some of the stainless steels commonly used to make surgical blades are hard as nails and are ground to be razor sharp. They will hold their edge well. However, when they do eventually lose it they take more effort / skill to get it back. Softer steels can still be honed to a very good edge, but lose it faster. Such steels are easier for people with average sharpening skills to get a good edge on without specialist equipment.

    Damascus is a generic name for a style of steel that's folded into layers. It can be made from stainless or carbon steels and has the same properties as the steel from which its made, i.e. you can buy stainless damascus or carbon damascus. Having said that, there is a lot of non defined cheap, tat damascus about. If you're going to go down the damascus route then money doesn't need to be a concern.

    In addition to the steel used, there's the design to think about. This is a personal choice, but does depend to an extent on the type of deer you stalk and the style of gralloch you prefer. For example, a knife with a deep and wide blade might not be ideal for a full gralloch on a small deer (the ring-piece on a muntjac is quite small and fiddley to get round), where as such a blade might be ideal for a field gralloch on a red.

    My dream gralloching knife would have a four inch, flat ground, drop point blade with a max depth at the handle of about three quarters of an inch. It would be made from Odin's Eye damasteel. The handle would be desert iron wood and it would say "Alan Wood" on it. That's my personal preference - others will have there's. In reality, I use an orange handled Mora clipper, which for my money has a great shape and good balance between edge retention and ease of sharpening. If I'm feeling really flash I might take my Cold Steel Lite Hunter out (about sixteen quid's worth) but I'm always scared I might lose it.


    Cheers,

    Bob

  4. #4
    Also depends on how much effort you will want to make and continue making to keep the blade pristine... i.e.: carbon steel vs stainless of some kind.

    From a personal viewpoint, I go for stainless 12RC30 / RWL34 / or VG10... but I hear good things about D2 lately.

    Money no object hmmm.. lots of choices in Makers, materials, waiting time. I have Alan Wood and Guy Stainthorpe at the top of my personal list as preferred makers, but that is only because I don't have experience of other UK makers who produce excellent knives to established or personal designs.

    Money 'No Option' ... I use Eicker and Victorinox butchers filleting knives, easy to sharpen, low cost, dishwasher safe. If you want a good sheath for either of these, have a look on the British Blade Forum for leather and Kydex products.

    The design, selection and even the patience factor are all part of a custom knife build, so enjoy it all if you decide to go that route.

    ATB

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Dovebob View Post
    DA,


    Any steel used in knife making is a balance / compromise between edge retention and ease of sharpening. For example, some of the stainless steels commonly used to make surgical blades are hard as nails and are ground to be razor sharp. They will hold their edge well. However, when they do eventually lose it they take more effort / skill to get it back. Softer steels can still be honed to a very good edge, but lose it faster. Such steels are easier for people with average sharpening skills to get a good edge on without specialist equipment.

    Damascus is a generic name for a style of steel that's folded into layers. It can be made from stainless or carbon steels and has the same properties as the steel from which its made, i.e. you can buy stainless damascus or carbon damascus. Having said that, there is a lot of non defined cheap, tat damascus about. If you're going to go down the damascus route then money doesn't need to be a concern.

    In addition to the steel used, there's the design to think about. This is a personal choice, but does depend to an extent on the type of deer you stalk and the style of gralloch you prefer. For example, a knife with a deep and wide blade might not be ideal for a full gralloch on a small deer (the ring-piece on a muntjac is quite small and fiddley to get round), where as such a blade might be ideal for a field gralloch on a red.

    My dream gralloching knife would have a four inch, flat ground, drop point blade with a max depth at the handle of about three quarters of an inch. It would be made from Odin's Eye damasteel. The handle would be desert iron wood and it would say "Alan Wood" on it. That's my personal preference - others will have there's. In reality, I use an orange handled Mora clipper, which for my money has a great shape and good balance between edge retention and ease of sharpening. If I'm feeling really flash I might take my Cold Steel Lite Hunter out (about sixteen quid's worth) but I'm always scared I might lose it.


    Cheers,

    Bob
    Bob,
    The knife that you are describing is Alan's Trout and Bird model, my girlfriend recently bought a very very nice one in elephant ivory and damascus and it is, without a doubt, the best knife I have ever used for gralloching small deer (when I'm allowed to borrow it!). I have made enquiries with Alan about making me the same thing in 12c27 steel with a orange G10 handle which, in my opinion should be the ultimate mix of quality and practicality.
    I am also awaiting delivery of a pair of larder knives by Stu Mitchell so I think that I'm pretty close to having all the knives that I need!
    Glyn.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Tikka 260 View Post
    Also depends on how much effort you will want to make and continue making to keep the blade pristine... i.e.: carbon steel vs stainless of some kind.

    From a personal viewpoint, I go for stainless 12RC30 / RWL34 / or VG10... but I hear good things about D2 lately.

    Money no object hmmm.. lots of choices in Makers, materials, waiting time. I have Alan Wood and Guy Stainthorpe at the top of my personal list as preferred makers, but that is only because I don't have experience of other UK makers who produce excellent knives to established or personal designs.

    Money 'No Option' ... I use Eicker and Victorinox butchers filleting knives, easy to sharpen, low cost, dishwasher safe. If you want a good sheath for either of these, have a look on the British Blade Forum for leather and Kydex products.

    The design, selection and even the patience factor are all part of a custom knife build, so enjoy it all if you decide to go that route.

    ATB
    Just seen Tikka260's reply as I was typing mine, my Stu Mitchell knives will be almost identical to the Guy Stainthorpe pair that he posted picture of a while ago but with G10 scales. Glyn.

  7. #7
    Glyn,

    Without hijacking the thread, please be sure and post up pics of the Stu Mitchell larder knives when you get your hands on them, knife porn is almost as good as gun porn !


  8. #8
    If it was no object, I'd have my knife made for me in CPMS90V.

    I once had a knife in that but hard times forced me to sell it. Awesome steel which I sharpened once in the years I had it.

    Stu Mitchell is an absolute gent to work with, as is Guy Stainthorpe, I've not had dealings with Alan Wood but his work is just as outsanding. All three make utterly stunning knives.

    Mine is currently in RWL34, but I have another in D2, yet another in S30V and a bag full of Moras for making kydex. Getting the right edge is paramount, Mora is too sharp and needs convexing. I recently came by a Pendleton Lite by Cold Steel from Moray Outfitters (on here) and I'm quite pleased with it so far, great edge geometry has it standing up well.

  9. #9
    Only one knife on the market that hits all the right spots is Puma ,puma, puma ip, or puma tec all top quality steel and workmanship .

  10. #10
    I'm not sure if this counts as "knife porn", but to get the ball rolling this is one of my favourites.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1099.jpg  

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