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Thread: Zeroing question

  1. #1

    Zeroing question

    I was just wondering what the best way is to hold the rifle when you are shooting off a bipod? I'm needing to zero the .22-250 this week and normally I would hold the fore-end of the rifle to prevent the barrel flipping up,(certainly I do this with the .270). But I have seen quite a few pictures where the shooter only has his right hand on the gun and his left hand coming across his body and almost supporting his right fore arm,(ie left hand holding right elbow).? If any of that makes sense, I was just wondering if it was a suitable way of holding the gun? I usually do it with the rimfires but I thought muzzle flip with the CFs might be an issue?


    I was also told that some ranges don't allow you to use the .22-250 on them? Is this correct? I would have thought you could easily push a light .243 bullet a lot faster than a .250? I only use factory rounds anyway?

  2. #2
    Dont know about about using said rifle on ranges but when target shooting and using a bipod i make a fist of my left hand and rest the point of the butt on top of it. (Cant remember if its called heel or toe). You can use your fist as a good solid rest and by either squeezing or relaxing your fist you can raise or lower point of aim..

    Hope this makes sense

    Regards pj

  3. #3
    The 22/250 exceeds the military stipulated muzzle velocity. Bisley for one can be vry funny about this as I found out when the regs changed years ago. I had a 22/250 at the time as was told I could no longer shoot it on the Bisley ranges. It's been yesr now since I shot at Bisley but best speak tot eh range office thee and get teh low down from the horses mouth.

  4. #4
    The Left hand (assuming a right handed shoooter) only supports the rifle it does not hold it, nor does it prevent flip. The right hand is the controlling hand. This is why a bipod can replace the role of the left hand and allow it to support the but as stated by PJ.
    Think about bench rest shooters, many of them use powerful rifles and the forward rest can do nothing to prevent flip.
    If you are holding down the fore end you are placing forces on the rifle that will affect the point of impact of the round.
    So in answer to your question, yes it is a suitable way of holding the rifle.
    Mick

  5. #5
    try different styles and use what works for you and your rifle. If you are not comfortable or the position feels weird you won't replicate it very well

    I don't like to practice something at the range that I can't do in the field.
    I dont use the .270 with a bipod in the field and as a result I have stopped zeroing with a bipod at the range.

    The fore-end hold is a personal choice as well. I hold (rather than rest) the fore-end as well, I have even gone as far as using the sling to pull the rifle down into my hand more using my elbow in a loop.
    Very handy when sitting.

  6. #6
    Good use of a proper sling is an art, and rarely used. Even the forces do not teach the sling these days, except for snipers.

    Jeff Cooper of Gunsite fame was a huge sling fan, and wrote many articles on the correct use of slings.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by pilgrimmick View Post
    The Left hand (assuming a right handed shoooter) only supports the rifle it does not hold it, nor does it prevent flip. The right hand is the controlling hand. This is why a bipod can replace the role of the left hand and allow it to support the but as stated by PJ.
    Think about bench rest shooters, many of them use powerful rifles and the forward rest can do nothing to prevent flip.
    If you are holding down the fore end you are placing forces on the rifle that will affect the point of impact of the round.
    So in answer to your question, yes it is a suitable way of holding the rifle.
    Mick
    How strange now if the left, supporting hand, also pulls the rifle back into the shoulder the right hand has less to do and trigger control surely is much easier.

    Perhaps if more people actually shot some free hand in various positions there would be less reliance on sticks for even 50 yard and under shots. Sticks and Bi-Pods are useful for an ambush were a wait on the aim position is required.

    Copper of course came along a bit late with the sling use as Col Townsend Whelen for one was teaching it's use when Cooper was still in nappies.

  8. #8
    When I first fired rifles with bipods, I was taught (by ex-military folk) to grab the sling swivel on the butt and push the stock back into my shoulder. As mentioned above, on some occasions my fist will just fit between the ground and the butt and give the opportunity to fine tune the elevation.

    However, as with many things, opinion varies widely. Nathan at the following links has very strong views about how a rifle should be held.

    http://www.ballisticstudies.com/

    He is quite happy to respond to specific questions and his site has some excellent articles. Whatever route you follow, lots of practice will help. Secondly, if you've not got a moderator, an AU-SL5 or similar will help the shooting too.

    Good luck. JCS
    Last edited by jcampbellsmith; 21-05-2012 at 09:18.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by pilgrimmick View Post
    Good use of a proper sling is an art, and rarely used. Even the forces do not teach the sling these days, except for snipers.

    Jeff Cooper of Gunsite fame was a huge sling fan, and wrote many articles on the correct use of slings.
    trouble with them is for stalking it's time-consuming to set up, you're potentially flailing your arms about, and if you're wearing a thick jacket the loop won't slide up your arm/sleeve easily.

  10. #10
    Brithunter, yes you are correct about T. Whelen, and your comments about more freehand shooting are spot on.

    PKL A well set up sling is far quicker in use than sticks, and allows for far more versatile shooting. They take practice though, and that is why so few people use them. If you have three sling swivels on your rifle (like the L42 and other sniper rifles)then the sling can be even more useful. The third swivel just in front of the magazine like this one on my Envoy.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Envoy:L42.JPG  

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