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Thread: is it an offence to be in posetion of a rifle bolt

  1. #1

    is it an offence to be in posetion of a rifle bolt

    Just a thought: hears the back ground, Im going to purchase a .22 rifle from a private seller. I have a free ticket for a .22 and moderator on my licence however My licence is away getting opened up should be back in a week.

    So here is the question if I offer cash before my licence is back can I take the bolt from the seller so that he cant resell it before my licence comes back. I know I can't take the rifle or the mod but what parts of a rifle can you own or be in possession of before it becomes an offence. ?

    What are the implications me having in my position a rifle bolt.

    I must stress the situation I have descrbed has not happend , and Im seeking guidance from this fourm to the implications before i would consider it.

  2. #2
    Can get complex, but general good rule of thumb is that any pressure bearing component requires some form of authority to possess. A bolt would fall into that.

    If you dont trust the guy enough to do the deal on cash basis etc, ask yourself if want to deal at all!

    However, in the vein of the original question, the stock maybe the item to go for.
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  3. #3
    Going back to first principles, I believe a firearm is defined as a 'lethal-barreled weapon'.... so I'd say you're OK.

    I'm not sure how moderators fit this designation, apart from the fact that these were previously controlled under the Acts. My thinking is that the CPS would be ridiculed in court if they brought charges against someone in possession of a rifle-bolt ..... in the circumstances you've outlined.
    If I'm going to be accused of it then it's just as well I did it.

  4. #4
    You need an FAC to buy a bolt - for example if you lost/damaged a bolt you would need to present your FAC to purchase a replacement. My belief is that the bolt and/or rifle constitue a 'firearm' so I don't think it would be wise to have ownership of the bolt.
    Will he not accept a deposit to hold the rifle? Draft a brief agreement that you both sign so you have a basic contract. I did the same when selling a car privately - got 500 deposit until the bankers draft arrived, then only sent the V5 when the funds had cleared - all covered on a basic document signed by both of us.
    Also - is the rifle worth the risk of looosing it against being in (possibly unlawful) possession of the bolt?
    David

  5. #5
    In Law the bolt is a component part of a firearm. As it is a pressure-bearing part, it is subject to Sect 1 control. Do not take possession of the bolt until the firearm is transferred to you.
    The other matters are ones of integrity and confidence. Much sound advice has been offered by out other members.

  6. #6
    Itis not just the complete firearm you need a certificate for, it is any componant part thereof as well. The bolt without question falls under that description. As it does not generally carry a serial number specific to one firearm, I would guess the logic that would be applied is that one bolt could be possessed per authorisation on your certificate. So, if you have a slot for a 243 for example and have not yet purchased that weapon,then possessing one bolt on its own may be acceptable. However, without any vacant authorisations on your cert, I would suggest then taking a bolt would not be acceptable.

    I am guessing at the latter part of the above, but the bit about any componant part is correct. Action and bolt without doubt would fall under that.

  7. #7
    Just checked something out on HMRC website and it appears that what I said earlier is correct. If you have authorisation to possess a weapon, than possessing individual parts to make that weapon is acceptable...

  8. #8
    Virbius, my understanding of what you say is slightly different. For an RFD to do any work on a firearm, you need to prove to them that you are in legal possession of the firearm. Now, if you are buying a bolt, it will need to be fitted to your action, and checked for head space, then proofed etc. so you will have to present the rifle. This means you will need to show the RFD proof of legal authority to hold before they hand the weapon back to you.

    If you're worried about him selling to someone else, could you not pay in full and get the firearm transferred to your local RFD to hold until your ticket comes back? It shouldn't cost much, and you can hand over the cash in the knowledge that he can't stiff you.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by matt_hooks View Post
    Virbius, my understanding of what you say is slightly different. For an RFD to do any work on a firearm, you need to prove to them that you are in legal possession of the firearm. Now, if you are buying a bolt, it will need to be fitted to your action, and checked for head space, then proofed etc. so you will have to present the rifle. This means you will need to show the RFD proof of legal authority to hold before they hand the weapon back to you.

    If you're worried about him selling to someone else, could you not pay in full and get the firearm transferred to your local RFD to hold until your ticket comes back? It shouldn't cost much, and you can hand over the cash in the knowledge that he can't stiff you.
    Yes, matt_hooks - and it you believe some comments on threads, the rifle has to be returned to the manufacturer as well.
    David

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Norm View Post
    In Law the bolt is a component part of a firearm. As it is a pressure-bearing part, it is subject to Sect 1 control. Do not take possession of the bolt until the firearm is transferred to you.
    The other matters are ones of integrity and confidence. Much sound advice has been offered by out other members.
    Iam with you uncle norm, but in any event if you have paid for the rifle, even in cash, the seller and you will have to fill in the transfers, so, it is hardly likely that once having done so, the seller can retain the rifle, if he does he commits an offence of theft, and is breach of his FA certificate (in possession of a firearm without current certificate), also a criminal offence flows from that under sec 1 FA 1968 up to 5 years custody, and of course if the seller was given a custodial sentence of 3 months, he banned for possessing a firearm for 5 years, and if he was given a 3 years sentence he is banned for life, I ask you would any rational thinking person in aour fraternity want to do that.....I don't think so

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