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Thread: blued rifle

  1. #1

    blued rifle

    hello, iv seen a nice t3 but its blued rather than stainless, my worry is that it will rust, obviously i will clean it after use but will i have to remove from the stock? and if so will this cause problems? also whats best to use to coat the gun in to prevent rust?

    thanks
    Tom

  2. #2
    Ive had a blued t3 for years now and it has seen some seriously shitty weather & hasn't got a spec of rust on it, all i do is give it a good wipe down with a oily rag after use and let it air off before storing it back in cabinet.
    bairn79

  3. #3
    do you remove it from the stock to clean it?

    thanks
    Tom

  4. #4
    No ive never removed the stock, I just give it a wipe down to remove any visible water, stand it barrel down for a while to let any water run away then give it a good clean..... done !!
    I often use WD40 (water displacement 40th attempt) but i know some people will say you shouldnt use it on guns !!
    bairn79

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Tomm View Post
    hello, iv seen a nice t3 but its blued rather than stainless, my worry is that it will rust, obviously i will clean it after use but will i have to remove from the stock? and if so will this cause problems? also whats best to use to coat the gun in to prevent rust?

    thanks
    Tom
    WTF!!!, blued/blackened rifles is the ONLY way to go,,,of course it will not rust, as long as you treat it well. SS will rust too, just less easily, but it will.

    buy a decent rifle in a nice blued steel, good quality beautiful wood that fits you well with all metal/steel parts and no modern gadget ****, and treat it well with good cleaning regime and wiped over with a decent gun oil after every outing.. it will last you a lifetime and will look and feel great...

    once you then come to renovating it, you can get it slow rust blued, and it wont rust AT ALL, and will look great, still....whilst all those plastic SS rifles have been scrapped decades before - ...suckers...

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by bairn79 View Post
    No ive never removed the stock, I just give it a wipe down to remove any visible water, stand it barrel down for a while to let any water run away then give it a good clean..... done !!
    I often use WD40 (water displacement 40th attempt) but i know some people will say you shouldnt use it on guns !!
    WD-40 is the worst thing for guns you can use. It gums. It attracts dust. And over time it will remove bluing. It's a rust penetrating agent and bluing is.....rust. Think about it.~Muir

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Tomm View Post
    hello, iv seen a nice t3 but its blued rather than stainless, my worry is that it will rust, obviously i will clean it after use but will i have to remove from the stock? and if so will this cause problems? also whats best to use to coat the gun in to prevent rust?

    thanks
    Tom
    Will it rust if not cared for............................................... .. of course.

    The stainless ones often rust faster .

    Take a look at this:-


    That's the date of manufacture of the receiver.


    That's who built the rifle into it's sporting/stalking type/style.


    The discolured patch on the magaine s where the blacking is worn.

    When I acquired the rifle i did remove the stock to check underneath and it had decades of accumulated dust etc. I doubt the stock had been removed for over half a century. This rifle had not been touched for several decades when it was found and sold to the RFD whom I acquired it from. After decades of not being touched by laying on some beize there are two spots of rust on the side of the barrel from dampness. If the rifle had been checked now and then and wiped over with an oily cloth then those would not have happened. People who see the rifle often remark at it's fine condition and it has NOT been restored.

    Oh yes the best thing I can think of as a use for WD40 gun related is as a reactive targe
    t .

    There are specially formulated oils for gun care go on be a devil and buy some .

    In America those heading out with rifles to the cold extremes or perhaps tot eh Pacific North West coast often pull the stock off and apply a coat of clear wax to the metal covered by the stock.
    Last edited by Brithunter; 27-06-2012 at 07:36. Reason: Forgot something

  8. #8
    Muir might be right with with WD40 where he is, we have the last time seen dust here about three years ago...since then it's raining.
    We often grease up triggers and fit the action in the stock with grease to keep the water and mud out.
    I also hold up side down and flush the rifle off with WD40, then wipe it off. (isn't bluing a carbonisation? WD would re-carbon?)

    Today I'll have a look at my new 98 that has just been blued, first non stainless in a while.

    I have a stainless pica rail that rusts like mad.
    Not sure who came up with stainless steel, could have been the Germans with their row of V steels (v=Versuchstahl) and
    they are called "Rostfrei" meaning rust free.
    edi

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by ejg View Post
    isn't bluing a carbonisation? WD would re-carbon?
    No bluing is 'rusting' the steel whether it is a slow acid blue or a hot caustic blue.

    Carbonization or carbonisation is the term for the conversion of an organic substance into carbon or a carbon-containing residue through pyrolysis or destructive distillation. It is often used in organic chemistry with reference to the generation of coal gas and coal tar from raw coal.
    Fossil fuels in general are the products of the carbonization of vegetable matter.
    Carburise, carburising is a heat treatment process in which iron or steel absorbs carbon liberated when the metal is heated in the presence of a carbon bearing material, such as charcoal or carbon monoxide, with the intent of making the metal harder. Depending on the amount of time and temperature, the affected area can vary in carbon content. Longer carburising times and higher temperatures lead to greater carbon diffusion into the part as well as increased depth of carbon diffusion. When the iron or steel is cooled rapidly by quenching, the higher carbon content on the outer surface becomes hard via the transformation from austenite to martensite, while the core remains soft and tough as a ferritic and/or pearlite microstructure.

    WD40 is a water displacement oil as mentioned previously.
    It really is of little use on a gun apart from its intended purpose de-watering.
    It must be wiped away then a quality gun oil or wax applied.
    My experience has found that WD40 will become hygroscopic after a while.

  10. #10
    Isnt rusting/oxidisation technically "oxidisation"

    It may not be just a simple ferrous oxide (Fe2o3) depending on what the reagent is.

    The Blue is there to stop the simple ferrous oxide forming as the oxide you want is Magnetite (Fe3o4), a black, much more stable and dense material than the red "rust" that swells and flakes.

    complexes of Nitrides and other compounds further impart colour, hardness and resistance to red ferrous oxide forming.

    but you still need to oil them!

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