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Thread: Brass with different number of firings?

  1. #1

    Brass with different number of firings?

    How important is it to keep brass batched in respect of number of firings please?

    I'm talking of hunting accuracy (99% of shots below 250 yards - most well below that) and not Olympic Gold medal standard but can I mix different fired quantities without any noticeable change in accuracy?

    Anyone seen data on t'interweb anywhere please?

    Thanks.
    Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it, hump it or learn from it then piss on it and walk away.

    "HOSPITALITY" - the art of making guests feel at home (when you wish they were).



  2. #2
    Not sure but I used some of these boxes
    http://www.ryman.co.uk/0161207070/Re...-Litre/Product
    Stack them and as I fire the brass they get dumped into the box below to try and keep them in some sort of organisation.
    ...................................
    I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy!
    Another 7mm08 shooter!

  3. #3
    If of the same make and prefrably of the same production "lot" the the case capacities should be fairly similar so the grouping should be no different.

    It's the wear and tear on the cases during the firing and re-loading cycle that takes it's toll. A lot is during sizing, perhaps more then some realise, so providing one take care to keep an eye out for the warning signs of case head separation of cracks in the side walls or neck/shoulder area there should be no real difference in the grouping from field shooting positions.

    Most reloaders try to keep cases in "batches" so we know how many times they have been reloaded.

  4. #4
    Brass wears with repeated firings. (stretching, thinning, work hardening) so you are best advised to keep them in batches, as Brit advised. To think you can do otherwise is pure wishful thinking.~Muir

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Eyefor View Post
    How important is it to keep brass batched in respect of number of firings please?....
    It depends is the short answer. I could certainly detect it being harder to seat bullets in 5 times fired brass than in the same brand of brass freshly annealed. I try to keep my brass in batches, but I am fairly sure I get it wrong from time to time. What I am trying to do now is get the brass annealed after every fourth firing. I've currently got batches of Remington brass for the 260 that have been fired 4 times, 5 times, 6 times, 7 times and 8 times. When I get enough 8 times fired brass I will get that lot annealed and carry on using it. What I do find with trying to manage the brass by number of firings is that inevitably I end up odd cases left over. Regards JCS
    Last edited by jcampbellsmith; 03-07-2012 at 23:29. Reason: bad grammar

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by jcampbellsmith View Post
    It depends is the short answer. I could certainly detect it being harder to seat bullets in 5 times fired brass than in the same brand of brass freshly annealed. I try to keep my brass in batches, but I am fairly sure I get it wrong from time to time. What I am trying to do now is get the brass annealed after every fourth firing. I've currently got batches of Remington brass for the 260 that have been fired 4 times, 5 times, 6 times, 7 times and 8 times. When I get enough 8 times fired brass I will get that lot annealed and carry on using it. What I do find with trying to manage the brass by number of firings is that inevitably I end up odd cases left over. Regards JCS
    Thanks.

    I anneal after 4 firings (manually, using Tempilaq) and will keep those groups at <4, <8, <12 (+?) separated.

    Most of my current batch of 22-250 (Norma) brass has been fired 10 or 11 times (so annealed twice and shortly due another) but I am getting signs of age with a couple of split necks recently so have invested in 200 new Norma that I wanted to check if I need to keep separate - but will still run the old stuff until it gives up completely.

    I am not running mega-hot (36.1gr Varget with 55gr Sierra 1360) and only neck size, not full length.

    Thanks for all replies.
    Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it, hump it or learn from it then piss on it and walk away.

    "HOSPITALITY" - the art of making guests feel at home (when you wish they were).



  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by jcampbellsmith View Post
    ..What I am trying to do now is get the brass annealed after every fourth firing...
    Adding slightly to what I said above. taylor on the Forum does the annealing for me with his Benchsource. Secondly, I am trying to work the brass as little as possible by using a full length bushing die with the expander ball removed. Regards JCS

  8. #8
    I recently got some lapua 308 cases,I trimmed them which makes them 2,005 oai,the necks grow about 5 fow after a shot,fl size and they grow another 5 fow,that was first time I checked that,I've always trim every time anyway,they don't always trim after one firing,seems as if they grow more on first few shots,I will keep a closer eye on them from now on,remy brass seems harder and don't stretch as much from what I've seen over the years,they didnt do many firings before they split though,

  9. #9
    Keeping cases in batches by manufacturer and number of firings is the best idea but if you have some mixed cases ;-
    Shoot them, then in this order :- deprime, tumble clean, anneal (every 4 loadings), full length resize, trim to length, then batch by weight.
    Closely inspect for incipient head separation, reload and shoot again.
    If you do this then the results should be fine for stalking and you r cases will last ok.
    Note I say full length resize as this tends to return the cases to a fixed size so that the internal volume is constant.

    Ian

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Yorric View Post
    Keeping cases in batches by manufacturer and number of firings is the best idea but if you have some mixed cases ;-
    Shoot them, then in this order :- deprime, tumble clean, anneal (every 4 loadings), full length resize, trim to length, then batch by weight.
    Closely inspect for incipient head separation, reload and shoot again.
    If you do this then the results should be fine for stalking and you r cases will last ok.
    Note I say full length resize as this tends to return the cases to a fixed size so that the internal volume is constant.

    Ian
    That is on the trusting assumption that the cases have the same volume. They most likely don't if they are from different manufacturers... and might not even from different LOTs from the same manufacturer. I worry less about the number of firings than I do manufacturers; a tired case will show itself fairly fast with little harm. Case volume on the other hand can drive a sane load to over maximum in an instant.

    My rule of thumb is to never work up loads with 2nd hand brass. (Note I didn't say "once fired"? How many times do we find that it wasn't?) You are adding a handful of variables into the mix that will slow your progress and confuse the results.~Muir
    Last edited by Muir; 08-07-2012 at 13:22.

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