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Thread: Leg shots; I cannot believe it.

  1. #1

    Leg shots; I cannot believe it.

    One of my German friends send me Uwe Tabel's "Auf der Scweissfaehrte" (On the tracking trail) a book written not for HS and BHS owners but for the German hunter with a (deer)dog as opposed to a scenthound.

    Well written, logical, well presented and full of top class advice, excellent pictures.

    I wish somebody would persuade the BDS to translate it.

    But going through it I cannot resist quote the special note on page 113.

    "Leg shots on roe.

    There are still people who believe that after a few hours a roe gets used to its broken leg and is thus more difficult to find. That is simply nonsense.
    On the contrary. The risk of an unsuccesful search immediately after a shot is extremely high".

    Would this evidence persuade some people in this country?

  2. #2
    Its always risky assuming anything - every deer is a separate case. But it is useful to take overall view in terms of weighing up a strategy. Sometimes we can only do what we believe to be best at the time - experience obviously helps there.

    In general a pure leg shot would indicate a hard recovery. If a suitable dog is to hand and the circumstance right, it is one of the times I would consider letting the dog 'go' straight away.

    Two examples to hopefully more directly answer the question - and show how you just never know -

    1. Client took a front leg on a Roe Buck from a High Seat over area of clear fell. Saw leg swinging as it ran for cover - no chance second shot.

    Immediately called colleague on phone to come over with his dog - a fantastic Lab in whom I had near total confidence. Stayed in highseat to avoid disturbance.

    About ten minutes later I saw a Buck emerge from the tree line - about 250 metres. Through the binoculars I was near certain it was 'our' buck. But the animal was completely relaxed and feeding normally. Grass prevented good view of the leg. Decision whether to shoot was made for me as the track colleague chose ran down side of same trees and I saw his truck approaching. No way going to shoot.

    As the Buck heard the truck it turned back into the woods - it was the leg shot buck!

    Within ten minutes the lab had done his stuff and buck was secured. Front left leg was shattered just below knee and lower leg hanging by skin.

    2. Out with client - who my colleagues called 'Jammy B....d'. Nice guy. Saw Roe Buck across side of a lochan. Shot taken and heard a loud crack come back. Watched animal run through some stunted larch and out of sight. No further sign after five minutes.

    Trusted client - so left in position whilst I brought truck up, then slowly approached shot site. Found few drops of blood, bone fragment and hair with skin. On hands and knees plotted course and found odd drops of blood. Client opens up ' are you going to follow a blood trail'? - YES ( Mr Grumpy ) 'Are you going to follow it all the way to the deer'? - THATS THE PLAN - even more grumpy at stupid questions. Still failing to pick up on client's tone - ' Well shall I just go and stand by it until you get there'? EH?

    Look up and client pointing at one very dead buck - on its back, three and a half legs in the air - 30 metres behind where it was standing - in first line of plough!

    The only bullet mark on it was a right front leg strike just above elbow. No body hit. Animal stone dead. Hence why we all call him 'Jammy B...d'!

    Think safest answer for most deer questions is - sometimes they do and sometimes they don't!
    Stalking, Courses, Gear - Moray Outfiiting Website here - Welcome
    BASC Approved Trainer & Assessor. Cairngorm National Park Authority Approved Supplier. Supported by Sauer Arms
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  3. #3
    Baron you see leg shoot or leg injuries are common and i my self believe you should not always believe what you read and there is no substitute to real life .
    Deer with broken bones will initially go down and should be shot again or if you have a good dog (that will take hold) He will pull it down very quick otherwise you could be leaving an animal to suffer for long periods. Tell the chap to give me a phone baron and i will put him straight on the matter.

  4. #4
    Sorry Moray some duplication here wrote at the same time.

  5. #5
    I'm sorry to say I understand neither what the quoted passage means nor whether I am supposed to think it is sensible.

    Does it mean that a search immediately after the shot is likely to be unsuccessful, and that therefore one would be better waithing a few hours;

    because the idea that the roe gets used to the broken leg after a few hours and is therefore likely to have frollicked away if the search is delayed is mistaken?
    Last edited by Dalua; 13-07-2012 at 12:46.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by 6pointer View Post
    . Tell the chap to give me a phone baron and i will put him straight on the matter.
    Now that would be a conversation where I would like to be a fly on the wall!

    But I am dreaming because I guess his scottish is not too good and I seem te remember that you once posted that your German was not either!

  7. #7
    6 Pointer - just great minds?
    Stalking, Courses, Gear - Moray Outfiiting Website here - Welcome
    BASC Approved Trainer & Assessor. Cairngorm National Park Authority Approved Supplier. Supported by Sauer Arms
    See you at the Stalking Fair, Scone & Moy 2017




  8. #8
    Mr Table, more than 50 years experience, maintains you should let a deer with a legwound settle rather than chasing it straight away with your dog.
    If you do the latter it is likely to go a long way.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Moray Outfitting View Post
    6 Pointer - just great minds?
    As both you and 6 pointer have a lot of practice the question to ask is probably the following:

    With your method of immediately searching after a legshot have you always got your deer or if not how many per 100 have you not been able to get?

  10. #10
    Now now Baron the question is this dose an animal suffer if left and will it stiffen up enough to catch if left my answer is no. Here are a couple of picture of deer that were left after they lost the use of limbs. I could go on as i do work very close to the roads and the railways.
    ps both are now thankfully dead.

    Page Eight and twelve all deer accounted for but could have been soon had we had the opertunity.

    http://www.thestalkingdirectory.co.u...comments_start
    PS THE DEER WITH NO BACK LEGS WAS HIT WITH A TRAIN WEEKS EARLIER WHAT SUFFERING DID THAT ANIMAL GO THROUGH.

    I SHOOT AROUND 80 DEER A YEAR AND OUT OF THAT NUMBER I WOULD SAY THERE WILL ONLY BE ONE OR TWO LEG SHOT DEER MAINLY BY CLIENTS. SO LETS NOT GET ITO THE HUNDREDS BECAUSE ANY ONE THAT IS LEG SHOOTING DEER IN THE HUNDREDS SHOULD NOT BE HOLDING AN FAC.
    Last edited by 6pointer; 13-07-2012 at 13:17.

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