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Thread: Buying Ammunition from someone who reloads?

  1. #1

    Buying Ammunition from someone who reloads?

    Hi all, have been thinking about the above and I am sure you guys will be able to steer me in the right direction. I have only recently started shooting earlier this year and my first purchase was a .222 tikka 590 which I am more than happy with. I suppose the ammunition isn't so bad at 23(ish) a pop for 20 Hornaday/Remingtons but there must be a way to cut out the middle man and buy similar/better ammunition from someone who reloads, by reading the forum this seems the way ahead for better accuracy. The selection available locally up north does not appear to be brilliant either. I am reluctant to put cheaper factory ammunition through the barrel as I will hopefully have this rifle for years to come and want to look after it. Is this legally allowed and is it accepted pratcice in shooting circles? Id rather someone private have a few pounds in there pocket extra and the odd bottle than hand my hard earned money over to the tax man. Many thanks, Gordon.

  2. #2
    I can't advise you on legalities (tho I'd wager it's illegal) but I would advise you on an ancient, American reloading axiom: "Never shoot someone else's reloads." It's a good rule to live by.

    Next: Reloading isn't that expensive. With the .222 you can use a Lee Classic tool and your (saved, right?) fired brass and put together handloads for very little money that will shoot very well indeed. It's the only tool I like for .222, myself, despite having a lot of other reloading gear. I get my best accuracy using it.



    Lastly, Why worry about "cheap" ammunition? If it's got a copper bullet and non-corrosive priming why worry? I have found PPU 6.5x55 ammo to be very accurate in my FN despite the fact that the loaded ammo costs less than Winchester or Remington un primed brass! I've shot about 200 rounds of it to generate brass for reloading and have done no harm to my sweet Belgian yet. ~Muir
    Last edited by Muir; 28-07-2012 at 12:10.

  3. #3
    As far as I am aware one needs a special licence to produce ammunition for sale.

    The Lee loader shown by Muir is not expensive however one needs so balance out how much you shoot to tell if you if your likely to save money or not.

  4. #4
    That is true but if you're looking to pay someone else to reload for you it is bound to be cheaper. If you are a casual shooter, you can buy 100 bullets, a keg of powder, and a box or two of primers and not make the trip to town for quite a while. I have a friend that knocks together 50 deer cartridges for his 270 about two months before the season starts. He checks his zero, gets his four deer, and spends the rest of his ammo shooting coyotes in the cold months. A box of bullets lasts him two years.~Muir

  5. #5
    I guess your problem with cutting out the middle man is that the same middle man will be involved in selling your reloading supplies.

    Reloading in itself makes an interesting hobby and if you shoot is well worth doing just for the increased knowledge gained and as Muir has detailed it need not cost a big pile of money. Sure there will be people telling you that a pile of gadgets are required but this isn't the case and you can keep the capital costs down to reasonable levels. On the other hand once you start loading yourself you are likely to want decent bullets and brass and so on and so your cost per bang may not decrease significantly below what you can buy factory ammo for. The middle man will still be taking his cut.

    So I'd say that if cost is your only driver then your time would be better spent looking for inexpensive factory ammo that shoots well in your rifle, lots of people seem to have luck with privi and the prices are around or below what you could load for. You must also factor in the cost of load development which means that you will be shooting a lot more ammo at targets and this will likely counterbalance the fact that it might be a little cheaper per bang with the reloads.

    If you are looking for better accuracy and also to gain a better understanding of ballistics and so on then I'd suggest that reloading your own ammo is the way to go. If you know someone locally who reloads then ask if you can watch and get a feel for what is involved. It isn't especially complex or difficult but most people who are being safe have lots of questions, I do and did, about what is normal and so on and many of those can be answered on this forum.
    For self catering accommodation on the Isle of Lewis please visit:
    http://www.7south.co.uk/




  6. #6
    I didn't realise there was such a thing as the Lee Classic tool, I thought reloading meant putting out 100's of pounds on presses etc it might be a good starting point I think to see how I get on for all I would initially be making. Do I need a variation on my licence to buy powder, primers & tips etc? I have kept the brass in the original boxes once fired too.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by flash222004 View Post
    I didn't realise there was such a thing as the Lee Classic tool, I thought reloading meant putting out 100's of pounds on presses etc it might be a good starting point I think to see how I get on for all I would initially be making. Do I need a variation on my licence to buy powder, primers & tips etc? I have kept the brass in the original boxes once fired too.
    No need for variation for reloading. You will have to present your FAC for expanding bullets.
    Reloading is fascinating and simple. There are however dangers involved and you need to spend time educating yourself. Start reading up as much as you can find on the internet and I would suggest investing in a manual.If you have a friend that reloads ask him to show you. Once you get into reloading you will find a whole new interest opening before you. Its as cheap or expensive as you want it to be.

  8. #8
    If you buy the Lee Loader and stick to the info on the card that comes with it you cannot go wrong and all your loads will be safe.
    The dipper is calculated to dip a measured amount of the powder listed on the card, there will be several powders to choose from but by using the same dipper you will end up with a charge of powder listed to use with the relevant bullet weight listed beside it in the column on the card.
    As long as you buy the powder recommended for the relevant weight bullet listed you cannot go wrong, it is one of the safest reloading tools on the market.
    I used one for years when I first started and still have it, the end is a little bashed where I used a normal hammer, not recommended, I have broken a couple of the de priming pins from the end of the rod and it is still in the cardboard box that it came in.
    Perhaps Muir can remember those days !!

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by EMcC View Post
    If you buy the Lee Loader and stick to the info on the card that comes with it you cannot go wrong and all your loads will be safe.
    The dipper is calculated to dip a measured amount of the powder listed on the card, there will be several powders to choose from but by using the same dipper you will end up with a charge of powder listed to use with the relevant bullet weight listed beside it in the column on the card.
    As long as you buy the powder recommended for the relevant weight bullet listed you cannot go wrong, it is one of the safest reloading tools on the market.
    I used one for years when I first started and still have it, the end is a little bashed where I used a normal hammer, not recommended, I have broken a couple of the de priming pins from the end of the rod and it is still in the cardboard box that it came in.
    Perhaps Muir can remember those days !!
    Yes Eddy my grandad told me all about those golden olden days
    Geordie

  10. #10
    What rough prices would I be looking at to start for powder, tips & primers etc then?

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