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Thread: Define 'Cross-Contamination'????

  1. #1

    Define 'Cross-Contamination'????

    Ok, here’s a scenario…..
    I’ve just shot two deer cleanly and humanely and proceed with the grallochs. Having done the first one which was let’s say a clean neckshot, I’ve inspected the entire animal and contents as required and I’m happy that all is well and there is no sign of disease or ‘contamination’. There is a small amount of blood on my knife and gloves which I decide not to clean or change before proceeding with thenext animal!!!
    The next animal is also deemed as fit for the food chain despite being gralloched with a ‘used’ knife and gloves. (Notice I haven’t used the word contaminated as neither deer has been classed as such!)
    The deer are then placed in the same carcass tray touching each other. They are then hung in the same chiller together, possibly touching.Then the game dealer collects and throws them in the van together. The butcher chops them up on the same board and then puts pieces of each animal into the same sausages and pies!
    Has ‘cross contamination’ occurred at any stage???
    MS
    Last edited by Monkey Spanker; 06-08-2012 at 16:39.

  2. #2
    To be honest with you as much as you may not like the answer but yes in nearly every way possible every thing that they touch can be classed as cross contamination from the gloves and knife right through to the board they where cut up on! From what i understand cross contamination Is where the carcuss touchs anything that it can pick up traces of any sort of substance from if that makes sense?

    Hope my ramberlings have help in some way
    adrian

  3. #3
    Is this of any help?
    Generally speaking, Cross Contamination occurs when one food item (usually an uncooked and therefore contaminated item ) somehow comes into contact with another food item and pathogenic bacteria are transferred (usually an item which requires no further cooking e.g. cooked meat or fish salad or raw vegetables)
    The cross contamination may occur in several ways :-
    By use of the same chopping board or knife for butchering or preparing or by blood or juices from an uncooked product dripping onto a cooked item
    Environmental Health Officers tell we food handlers that all uncooked meat carries bacteria which may be harmful if eaten.
    Sorry if i have muddied the water!
    Ed

  4. #4
    So.... from first reply, everything is cross contaminated and therefore not fit for the food chain.

    Second reply states that anything uncooked is contaminated anyway so as long as we cook it properly I don't need to bother changing my gloves!
    Further to my first question..... Is blood a contaminant?

  5. #5
    what ever you shoot the carcass is contaminated as soon as the bullet strikes !

    unless your are going to disinfect and sanitise you barrel after every stalk i wouldnt worry about it

  6. #6
    [QUOTE=Is blood a contaminant?[/QUOTE]

    Freddy murcury's was.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monkey Spanker View Post
    So.... from first reply, everything is cross contaminated and therefore not fit for the food chain.

    Second reply states that anything uncooked is contaminated anyway so as long as we cook it properly I don't need to bother changing my gloves!
    Further to my first question..... Is blood a contaminant?
    More to the point, is the cross "contamination" reasonably identifiable, by you, as a public health issue or not?

    If the "contaminants" wot gets crossed are "harmless" i.e. not a public health issue perhaps/arguably that is inconsequential. However, if pathogens or other "contaminants" from a carcase which is only fit to be rejected are spread to another which would otherwise be "acceptable", into the food chain, then you might have a problem. Do you have any concerns of this possibilty, in this instance? ... As you certainly give no indication of such.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamus View Post
    More to the point, is the cross "contamination" reasonably identifiable, by you, as a public health issue or not?

    If the "contaminants" wot gets crossed are "harmless" i.e. not a public health issue perhaps/arguably that is inconsequential. However, if pathogens or other "contaminants" from a carcase which is only fit to be rejected are spread to another which would otherwise be "acceptable", into the food chain, then you might have a problem. Do you have any concerns of this possibilty, in this instance? ... As you certainly give no indication of such.
    Tamus, the question was purely hypothetical and designed to raise debate on what is in my opinion a very 'grey area'! My scenario features two perfectly healthy animals. Best practice guidelines insist that we change our gloves and clean our tools between grallochs but if a DSC2 candidate chose not to for instance in a similar situation to above, would it be acceptable? If neither animal is deemed as contaminated (and we sign a game tag declaration to this effect) has wrong been done, considering they may end up in the same batch of sausages anyway?

  9. #9
    Well i guess its down to personal judgement alot of of things are a contamant but to what is a exeptable level is down to you to make up your own mind as a trained hunter as your name goes on the ticket

  10. #10
    I'm no expert on harmful/non-harmful bacteria but I do know how to get a carcass into the food chain following best practice. I don't think you have to have an in depth knowledge of the scientific ins and outs of cross contamination in order to do this.

    If a basic definition is - to cause the carcass to come into contact with something that would make it a risk to health and/or unfit for consumption - then you are just doing all you can to avoid this with a basic knowledge of what could cause it.

    I think you only learn how to do a clean gralloch with experience and then you pick up tips along the way that also help in making a clean job of it.

    How can blood be a contaminant unless it has been sat around? If you have spilt some of the gut inside the carcass then any blood in the chest cavity can carry it and spread it around???

    As for knives. Again, common sense surley? you wouldn't open up the stomach of carcass 1 with your knife and then start the gralloch on carcass 2 without cleaning it would you? Antibacterial wipes are readily available and easily carried.

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