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Thread: .222 min oal in lee manual

  1. #1

    .222 min oal in lee manual

    Hi guys. Been reading my lee 2nd edition before i start getting kitted out for reloading but got a question for yous. There is a paragraph which explains about reading the diagramme for the .222 and its says they are using max dimensions, but the number they have got for oal is the same as the min oal next to the h4198 powder thats for a 50grn. sure its 2.130, so would i just work up from that number for the seating depth , just looking to know as much before i start getting all the gear. Cheers

  2. #2
    Maybe they mean that it should be loaded to that length, only? I don't pay much attention to listed OAL's. My first trial is usually loaded with the bullet base at the neck-shoulder junction. (With few exceptions) I adjust from there.~Muir

  3. #3
    Thanks Muir, have you loaded much for .222.

  4. #4
    http://www.larrywillis.com/OAL.html

    This may help.
    To make an OAL gauge I half neck sized a case to get a friction fit for the bullet.
    Then insert a bullet into the empty case.
    Insert that into the chamber and lock down the bolt.
    Remove case and bullet and measure the OAL.
    Repeat 5 times for an average figure.

    The Hornady lock'n'load tool does not measure to the bolt face.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Fifestalker25 View Post
    Thanks Muir, have you loaded much for .222.
    For the last 40 years, more or less.

    I don't get too preoccupied with distance from the lands and I don't believe that the best accuracy is always found by seating the bullet out. The .222 has a marvelously long neck which will do much in keeping the bullet pointed in a straight line regardless of the amount of "jump". I start each new load with the bullet seated at the base of the neck as I described, then may tweak outward a little but if I get no love with varying powder charges and primers at that length, I am very surprised. My latest .222 loads revisiting H322 shoot sub 1/2 MOA with Speer TNT. I forget what the length is, but I simply eyeballed the bullet to the neck/shoulder junction, measured it (recorded it) and shot. No adjustments necessary. The load is as accurate as the shooter from my Winchester Model 70.~Muir

  6. #6
    Thanks for info guys. For starting out im thinking of using h4918 with a 50grn hornady sp. Will this make a goos combo. Suppose a wont know untill a try, just have to wait till next week for the dies to come. Thanks

  7. #7
    Try 18 grains to start. Seat the bullet anywhere to start and tweak the length as you feel the need. Eighteen to 19 grains with a 50-53 grain bullet has won a lot of benchrest matches. Good luck.~Muir

  8. #8
    Think the lee dipper with dies only goes to 17.3grns so will have to get a wee set of scales. Didnt think the .222 was to much of a target shooters caliber, what distances do they shoot them on a bench rest comp.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Fifestalker25 View Post
    Think the lee dipper with dies only goes to 17.3grns so will have to get a wee set of scales. Didnt think the .222 was to much of a target shooters caliber, what distances do they shoot them on a bench rest comp.
    sorry but I have to ask what rock have you been living under?

    Until the short and fat brigade came along the .222 Remington was about THE cartridge to beat.

    I am not that informed on bench rest shooting itself although I have a good friend in St Louis who shoots it and Hi Power competition at 600 yards but I believe most matches are shot t 100 & 200 yards. Of course they also shoot bench rest out to 1,000 yards on suitable ranges but as I said I believe 100 & 200 are the most common. The .22 calibre bullet is too light really for 600 yards as Steven found out so he moved up to 6mm and he last rifle build was in 6.5x284 if I recall correctly.

  10. #10
    100 and 200 yard small group Bench Rest. It reigned supreme in the 1950's and early 60's. In the right gun it is still a cartridge to beat. Back in the earlyt eighties I had a heavy barreled SAKO bench rest gun that someone, curse them, had rechambered from .222 to .223 because of "cheap brass". The .223 was exceptionally accurate but I had shot the gun as a .222 earlier and there was no comparison. Even in my less-than-competent hands it shot 100M groups in the "ones". It was never quite that good as a .223. I meant to set the barrel back and rechamber it back to .222 but a baby came along and the gun moved along to it's next owner who chambered it for 22PPC. ~Muir
    Last edited by Muir; 11-08-2012 at 19:48.

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