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Thread: Combat Action Tourniquet

  1. #1

    Combat Action Tourniquet

    Thought that fellow chainsaw operators would be interested in seeing this tourniquet developed by the military for Afgan use and is now being issued to UK ambulance teams. It looks like a useful piece of kit that can be self applied and maybe prevent loss of life.

    This link shows how to use it

    They can be bought on ebay or on spservices http://www.spservices.co.uk/item/Bra..._0_3738_0.html

    I hope no one ever has to use one.

    R

  2. #2
    Couple of points

    1. Wrong section!

    2. I would only buy these from a reputable source, there were some made as cheap copies that may fail at the wrong moment

    (http://www.medicalsci.com/files/comb...powerlite_.pdf )

    3. Most bleeding can be stopped by firm direct pressure. Applying a tourniquet sufficiently tightly will get very painful very quickly.

    There are civilian applications (and I own a couple) but they are for real 'brown stuff hitting fan' moments, almost all traumatic wounds would be better treated with pressure. In the military traumatic limb amputations much more likely and that's what they were initially designed for (and they have saved many lives).

    Section 161 of the Highways Act 1980 (England & Wales) makes it an offence to discharge a firearm within 50 ft of the centre of a highway with vehicular rights without lawful authority or excuse, if as a result a user of the highway is injured, interrupted or endangered.

  3. #3
    Top bit of kit along with Celox a must for the first aid box!

  4. #4
    I hate negative posts on SD so will try to be as constructive as possible on this.

    All points made by Apache are correct - in addition to a reputable supplier giving you genuine kit, they are unlikely to carry 'bad' products generally. As per every SAS/Bodyguard/Close Protection/ Are you 'Ard enuff etc etc TV show - SP Services are pretty high up the supplier tree.

    We all have freedom of choice and the issue of tourniquets is down to personal choice and circumstance. There is a lot of medical argument raging still on their use ( in fact whole field of Trauma Medicine is in a state of flux as 'lessons' from Iraq/Afghan filter though the evaluation process ) some of the adverse comments stem from previous over and poorly thought out use.

    Watching the above video alone in no way gives you the information to make a proper decision on whether and how to deploy one. Thats not a criticism of the thread starter in any way - Red256 I hope you take this post as a constructive contribution; I cast no aspersion on your choice, experience etc. Find out the facts ( be aware some medics wont be fully up to speed ) and make your own choice and preplan exactly how you will use. I suspect Red has done this and thats his perogative. I can fully appreciate that chainsaw users are wise to ponder remote traumatic amputation/ deep wound scenarios.

    From bitter experience of high stress situations ( and not just approaching John for a pay raise ) the fine motor coordination that was required in that video will be beyond many. I doubt I'd be up to self administration of that product. Again, self research will point you in the right direction if you choose to carry one.

    Not publicly for or against them at this time - believe its an individual choice.
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Apache View Post

    3. Most bleeding can be stopped by firm direct pressure. Applying a tourniquet sufficiently tightly will get very painful very quickly.

    There are civilian applications (and I own a couple) but they are for real 'brown stuff hitting fan' moments, almost all traumatic wounds would be better treated with pressure. In the military traumatic limb amputations much more likely and that's what they were initially designed for (and they have saved many lives).
    Its very hard to treat chainsaw wounds with pressure

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Acm View Post
    Its very hard to treat chainsaw wounds with pressure
    It's very hard to treat chainsaw wounds!

    Depends where they are. I would lay you a bet almost all wounds could be treated 'better' with pressure rather than a tourniquet. You can stop the flow from the femoral artery alone with direct pressure. The biggest issues with tourniquets is they take more skill and dexterity applying correctly and can only be used on certain extremity wounds. When issued the idea was one soldier used the CAT on their fallen comrades, not on them self. If you are under enemy fire then I would pick it as a first line treatment, hopefully you are not (savage tree huggers down your way ?).

    A couple of big dressings can be used anywhere.

    Things like CAT tourniquets and Quick Clot/Celox have their place but sometimes these threads could make the less knowledgeable people throw away their usual kit and go out with a sachet of haemostatic and a tourniquet and find themselves unable to mend most problems! Even when using a haemostatic you need to bandage it to keep it in the wound and absorb the moisture to concentrate the clotting factors.

    Section 161 of the Highways Act 1980 (England & Wales) makes it an offence to discharge a firearm within 50 ft of the centre of a highway with vehicular rights without lawful authority or excuse, if as a result a user of the highway is injured, interrupted or endangered.

  7. #7
    I also carry a pair of hemostats to clamp arterys.

  8. #8
    Hi
    I am glad I posted the thread as good replies are being received that let all make their own decisions on bleeding.


    R

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by deer man View Post
    Top bit of kit along with Celox a must for the first aid box!
    Nice to see someone else believes in being prepared. I also carry above kit yes it's when **** hits the fan but it could be the difference between death or survival.
    Wingy

  10. #10
    What a horrendously bad video! Couple of major points missed here. Only use for a catastrophic bleed, as in your going to bleed out and die and direct or indirect pressure have failed or pointless in the situation. In my experience within the Nhs, once a tourniquet had gone on you loose what ever is below it. So put the tourniquet about an inch above the wound, not as high as possible. Also only put on a single bone limb.

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