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Thread: The 'Menace' of wild boar

  1. #1

    The 'Menace' of wild boar

    Anybody see this:-

    http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/2924874

    Why oh why is the SGA so anti wild boar?

    They're in support of seasonal protection for sika but agin the RE-introduction of a native animal?

    Is it just my cynical mind or is this a case of 'we don't like what we don't know'?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuwinda View Post
    Anybody see this:-

    http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/2924874

    Why oh why is the SGA so anti wild boar?

    They're in support of seasonal protection for sika but agin the RE-introduction of a native animal?

    Is it just my cynical mind or is this a case of 'we don't like what we don't know'?

    If I was putting money on the answer I'd go with... Another omnivorous critter that can wipe out game? and for whom conventional stock fencing is not much of a barrier....... No thanks!

  3. #3
    they knock over feeders and generally are a pain in the arse ok, so any excuse to get rid of a pest then?

    If boar kill lambs I'd like to see that evidence, any little bit of footage would do

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by paul at barony View Post
    they knock over feeders and generally are a pain in the arse ok, so any excuse to get rid of a pest then?

    If boar kill lambs I'd like to see that evidence, any little bit of footage would do
    I don't know if they kill lambs, but my European clients tell me they kill new born Roe, been told this by numerous
    clients so suspect there is more than a grain of truth in it.

    They can do serious damage to crops, and while the idea of boar roaming freely might appeal to some stalkers
    in the main those of us involved in land management are against their introduction.

    Previous poster mentioned Sika and considering the damage they have done to our native Red deer by cross breeding
    [ many experts believe that only Reds living on some of the Hebridean Islands can be classed as truly pure, which is why its illegal to release Red Deer on the islands as any introduction can't be guaranteed pure]

    So in light of what they have done to our native deer I believe they should never have been allowed to become established, however they are now widespread and their eradication nigh impossible, so we just need to accept
    what we have let happen and live with it.

    Some argue that Boar were once native to this country, which of course they were, however the country side has changed a great deal since those times.

    At the moment there are no close season for Boar, considering the hue and cry there is about out of season permits and night shooting of deer, it would be a lot worse with Boar considering they can do far more damage than deer.

    May be thought controversial by some, but from a land managers point of view I say shoot on sight don't let them become established .

  5. #5
    The UK has a growing boar population and they are there to stay. So instead of living in cloud cuckoo land and thinking you can shoot them out its better to work out how your going to manage them.

    True they will turn over all your feeders overnight, everynight. Yes they do damage agriculteral land. No they don't damage forest. They may take the odd roe but its strange that the places i work my dogs on have a very high boar population and plenty of roe and of high quality. they also run very successful pheasant shoot there. It is a bit scary when a huge boar comes out of a drive and stands and looks at you when you are armed with nothing more than a spaniel. Or the spaniel is nearly mown down by a boar during a pheasant drive.
    They are here to stay. Learn to live with them

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogtrotter View Post
    I don't know if they kill lambs, but my European clients tell me they kill new born Roe, been told this by numerous
    clients so suspect there is more than a grain of truth in it.

    They can do serious damage to crops, and while the idea of boar roaming freely might appeal to some stalkers
    in the main those of us involved in land management are against their introduction.

    Previous poster mentioned Sika and considering the damage they have done to our native Red deer by cross breeding
    [ many experts believe that only Reds living on some of the Hebridean Islands can be classed as truly pure, which is why its illegal to release Red Deer on the islands as any introduction can't be guaranteed pure]

    So in light of what they have done to our native deer I believe they should never have been allowed to become established, however they are now widespread and their eradication nigh impossible, so we just need to accept
    what we have let happen and live with it.

    Some argue that Boar were once native to this country, which of course they were, however the country side has changed a great deal since those times.

    At the moment there are no close season for Boar, considering the hue and cry there is about out of season permits and night shooting of deer, it would be a lot worse with Boar considering they can do far more damage than deer.

    May be thought controversial by some, but from a land managers point of view I say shoot on sight don't let them become established .
    I tend to sympathise with your dodgy advice. On the other hand I think that wild boar would be a fascinating, if destructive from the keeper or farmer/stockman's P.O.V, additional (not native) quarry and environmental gain species.

    The problem with the "shoot on sight" policy currently (as I see it) is the need to address the question of ownership and liabilty. An owner may be liable for the damage they do, equally a shooter may be liable to the owner if these animals are shot without consent. "Getting-away-with-it" is all well and good but denies the reality of killing domestic livestock (albeit escaped ones) without owners' consent.

    What is the SGA's standpont on killing them here, right now?
    Last edited by Tamus; 09-09-2012 at 11:48. Reason: typos

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jagare View Post
    The UK has a growing boar population and they are there to stay. So instead of living in cloud cuckoo land and thinking you can shoot them out its better to work out how your going to manage them.

    True they will turn over all your feeders overnight, everynight. Yes they do damage agriculteral land. No they don't damage forest. They may take the odd roe but its strange that the places i work my dogs on have a very high boar population and plenty of roe and of high quality. they also run very successful pheasant shoot there. It is a bit scary when a huge boar comes out of a drive and stands and looks at you when you are armed with nothing more than a spaniel. Or the spaniel is nearly mown down by a boar during a pheasant drive.
    They are here to stay. Learn to live with them
    Maybe in the south, but in Scotland a few escapees and illegal introductions but not to late to get rid of yet if we make the effort.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamus View Post
    I tend to sympathise with your dodgy advice. On the other hand I think that wild boar would be a fascinating, if destructive from the keeper or farmer/stockman's P.O.V, additional (not native) quarry and environmental gain species.

    The problem with the "shoot on sight" policy currently (as I see it) is the need to address the question of ownership and liabilty. An owner may be liable for the damage they do, equally a shooter may be liable to the owner if these animals are shot without consent. "Getting-away-with-it" is all well and good but denies the reality of killing domestic livestock (albeit esceped ones) without owners' consent.

    What is the SGA's standpont on killing them here, right now?

    Tamus, what is the law regarding the killing of domestic livestock are they not regarded as feral
    after a certain time.

    Not sure on that one, as I have culled sheep for a forestry company in the past sheep that had been in the forest for sometime[large young forest don't know how they gained entry as the fences were good] and despite the farmer being asked repeatedly to remove them he had not done so , or more likely had been unable to round them up in the young forestry.
    he was informed if they were not removed by certain time they would be shot.

    Would the same not apply to Boar?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogtrotter View Post
    Tamus, what is the law regarding the killing of domestic livestock are they not regarded as feral
    after a certain time.

    Not sure on that one, as I have culled sheep for a forestry company in the past sheep that had been in the forest for sometime[large young forest don't know how they gained entry as the fences were good] and despite the farmer being asked repeatedly to remove them he had not done so , or more likely had been unable to round them up in the young forestry.
    he was informed if they were not removed by certain time they would be shot.

    Would the same not apply to Boar?
    In the instance you cite, the owner was "asked repeatedly to remove them" presumably this was done formally i.e. in writing, at some point, giving him fair warning nd ample opportunity to act. His failure to act then gives some grounds for the forestry company's subsequent action, i.e. employing you to shoot them... However, I suspect nothing came of the situation more by good luck and common sense than anything else. That is to say the owner "wrote off" his stock rather than be held to account for the nuisance they/he caused. With the right paperwork and a following wind your actions went unchallenged. That doesn't mean they couldn't have been challenged. Though, I can't see any Sheriff being easily presuaded you had acted wrongfully.

    "Shoot-on-sight" does not imply the same... due process. I guess you really would want to make every effort to follow the above "due process" first, in order to stay in the right.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamus View Post
    In the instance you cite, the owner was "asked repeatedly to remove them" presumably this was done formally i.e. in writing, at some point, giving him fair warning nd ample opportunity to act. His failure to act then gives some grounds for the forestry company's subsequent action, i.e. employing you to shoot them... However, I suspect nothing came of the situation more by good luck and common sense than anything else. That is to say the owner "wrote off" his stock rather than be held to account for the nuisance they/he caused. With the right paperwork and a following wind your actions went unchallenged. That doesn't mean they couldn't have been challenged. Though, I can't see any Sheriff being easily presuaded you had acted wrongfully.

    "Shoot-on-sight" does not imply the same... due process. I guess you really would want to make every effort to follow the above "due process" first, in order to stay in the right.
    OK thanks understood

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