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Thread: Wounded - Dispatching deer at RTA

  1. #1

    Wounded - Dispatching deer at RTA

    I have just read an article written by John Rippin in the Oct edition of Shooting Sports which describes how to deal with wounded dear. I am a little concerned at the section relating to RTA as it lacked clarification and could be misleading.

    In an RTA situation the writer would use a 17HMR and taking a head shot no longer than 30-40 yards and shot placement being the brain.

    No reference is made in the article to any legal issues associated with attending to wounded deer at an RTA scene with the public possibly present.

    I have the following questions :-

    1. 17hmr is not a legal calibre for use on deer. can this be used on RTA incidents?

    2. What is the situation regards conditions on your FAC ?

    3. What about taking a head shot 30 -40 yards away?

    4. How should the carcass be dealt with?

    5. If the police are not at the scene what is the proceedure?

    My concern with the article is that it could give the impression that anybody with a 17HMR could pitch up at a RTA and land themselves in a whole lot of trouble. I feel that the whole article was poor and misleading.

  2. #2
    Hi,
    There are far too many issues with what you have written in the above post and I should imagine the magazine will get lots of letters putting the writer of the article straight.
    I suggest you do a search of this forum as the topic has been covered in great length previously.
    Sorry to sound negative but, seriously, there are too many innacuracies and far more involved than just turning up with a 17hmr.

  3. #3
    In England.

    An injured deer may be killed out of season or at night if to prevent suffering.
    Any rifle used must be of legal calibre and suitable ammunition must be used in it
    Any shotgun may be used provided the deer was so seriously injured[other than by this illegal act] that to do so was an act of mercy.

    A knife may also be used but care and skill must be displayed since a charge of causing unnecessary could be brought by a clumsy or inexpert attempt.


    In Scotland

    Any weapon or any method may be used, a charge of unnecessary cruelty could still be brought for an inappropriate choice of method or inexpert operation.

    Suppose it would depend on the wording on your FAC but would be covered by most open tickets.

    Carcase would be the property of the highways authority, but I have been asked to deal with it from time to time.

    If asked to deal with it a carcase involved in an RTA may not enter the food chain, suppose you could eat it yourself if you choose but it must not be sold.

    Any animal involved in a RTA and still at the scene has usually sustained injury's so severe that there will be little usable meat, also consider the effects of the raised levels of adrenaline caused by stress.


    I have only ever attended RTAs when requested to do so by the police, I would be reluctant to attend unless requested to do so.


    Also consider insurance, the insurance cover provided by some of the shooting organisations may be sufficient
    I am not sure, I have my own insurance cover in place for such events

  4. #4
    Moonstone Boggy is on the money and i my self have at time wounderd what road it might go down should i be stopped by the police removing a deer very close to the public highway. Legal or not some of the situations we find our selves in have never been tested in a court of law. What i will say is in the bright side the SNH BP team are righting a full guide to urban deer not just from the Shooters point of view but also for the public body,s to use. In that will be a conprhensive guide to dealing with RTA,s i am sure. Now we know that the DI who have writen the best pratice guides for england wil follow suit with there version allowing for the changes in law north and south of the border.
    Contact. SNH =http://www.snh.gov.uk/land-and-sea/managing-wildlife/managing-deer/

    Contact DI = http://www.thedeerinitiative.co.uk/best_practice/

    Now these to organisations are the legal body,s in charge of what we do with deer. Follow there guideline or advice and if you did end up in a court of law i am sure you would have the full backing of your government should you follow the advice of an Internet forum member i am sure that would be the end in some cases.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by moonstone gsp View Post
    I have just read an article written by John Rippin in the Oct edition of Shooting Sports which describes how to deal with wounded dear. I am a little concerned at the section relating to RTA as it lacked clarification and could be misleading.

    In an RTA situation the writer would use a 17HMR and taking a head shot no longer than 30-40 yards and shot placement being the brain.

    No reference is made in the article to any legal issues associated with attending to wounded deer at an RTA scene with the public possibly present.

    I have the following questions :-

    1. 17hmr is not a legal calibre for use on deer. can this be used on RTA incidents?

    2. What is the situation regards conditions on your FAC ?

    3. What about taking a head shot 30 -40 yards away?

    4. How should the carcass be dealt with?

    5. If the police are not at the scene what is the proceedure?

    My concern with the article is that it could give the impression that anybody with a 17HMR could pitch up at a RTA and land themselves in a whole lot of trouble. I feel that the whole article was poor and misleading.
    I can only speak for how the RTA responders work in Avon and Somerset but:

    1 Yes it can.
    2 You get a specific condition on your ticket saying all firearms you possess can be used whilst attending incidents under the RTA scheme.
    3 That's up to the individual at the scene.
    4 The council/highways should be informed by the police (you normally have to tell them to do this) and they deal with the carcass.
    5 The police often aren't at the scene so you deal with it in your own way.

    Regarding insurance, it is available from BASC as a free add on if you fill in a form and send it to them, I believe the BDS also cover as part of their insurance but that is from memory and I may not be right, you'd have to check with them.

    It doesn't sound like the best article in the world.

  6. #6
    benc
    thanks for your reply. whilst I don't have despatch as a condition on my FAC I have often wondered what the situation is from a legal perpective.
    Many Thanks
    moonstone

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Benc View Post
    I can only speak for how the RTA responders work in Avon and Somerset but:

    1 Yes it can.
    2 You get a specific condition on your ticket saying all firearms you possess can be used whilst attending incidents under the RTA scheme.
    3 That's up to the individual at the scene.
    4 The council/highways should be informed by the police (you normally have to tell them to do this) and they deal with the carcass.
    5 The police often aren't at the scene so you deal with it in your own way.

    Regarding insurance, it is available from BASC as a free add on if you fill in a form and send it to them, I believe the BDS also cover as part of their insurance but that is from memory and I may not be right, you'd have to check with them.

    It doesn't sound like the best article in the world.
    prity much the same here too, all constabularys have a differant way of dealing with things.

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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Benc View Post
    I can only speak for how the RTA responders work in Avon and Somerset but:

    1 Yes it can.
    2 You get a specific condition on your ticket saying all firearms you possess can be used whilst attending incidents under the RTA scheme.
    3 That's up to the individual at the scene.
    4 The council/highways should be informed by the police (you normally have to tell them to do this) and they deal with the carcass.
    5 The police often aren't at the scene so you deal with it in your own way.

    Regarding insurance, it is available from BASC as a free add on if you fill in a form and send it to them, I believe the BDS also cover as part of their insurance but that is from memory and I may not be right, you'd have to check with them.

    It doesn't sound like the best article in the world.
    +1 - I'm on the RTA Scheme in Sussex and same as above applies (though I use an assortment of rifle's/shotguns depending upon the situation).

    Legally speaking, any insrument can be used as long as it does not cause "prolonged suffering" - so theoretically if you were confident you could put the animal down quickly you could use a wratchet... though I woudn't reccommend this obviously!

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