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Thread: Good one to Cull (and my first Roe!)

  1. #1

    Good one to Cull (and my first Roe!)

    Will keep this short and this had been previously mentioned by Daft Dog - but wanted to share it and was a great stalk and learnt loads (also wanted to share the pic's).

    Went out with Malc on Saturday evening. Was a very still night and not much was moving. We had seen a single roe doe before we approached the crest of a hill in a stubble field. Next thing i hear is Malc saying, "its a buck", followed by "its cullable". We move through some cover crop to get into a position to get a shot. We move when his head is down and stay dead still whilst his head is up. He knows something is not quite right but with the advantage of a dark forest behind us and what little wind in our face we get into a postion so that i can get the rifle up on the sticks. Made the mistake of holding on him for too long and i started to doubt myself. Took my head of the stock for a second and then back on and dropped him on the spot. Amazing our easy it is to be looking down the scope for too long and before you know it the crosshairs are all over the place!

    Whilst we knew he was a cullable buck it was not till we moved in that we realised why he was a good one to cull. One of his antlers had a strange kink at the base and was shorter than the other. Seeing this, we looked on the opposite side of his body for any injuries and low and beyond on his opposite back leg he a wound that exposed the bone. Whilst it had healed it had affect his antlers.

    Back at the bothy the 'cuppa' was served in a green glass bottle with 'Becks' written on the side. Cheers Malc for a great time.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Deer2.png   Deer pic 1.png   Leg.png  

  2. #2
    A nice 'different' head to keep for you there!

  3. #3

  4. #4
    Good animal to take, well done.

    I shot one last ear with a similar old injury, probably caught in a fence wire. Strangely, although his walking was stiff and there was some lameness and muscle wastage, the antlers were good and even, a six pointer. Any ideas why some develop uneven antler growth, while others continue with good even antlers? Could it be the length of time since the leg damage, i.e. longer time = more deformation of antler, or perhaps the opposite? Open to suggestions.

    Mark

  5. #5
    Nice read Joe, it was certainly an interesting one!

    All the best, hope to catch up again in the future sometime.

    Jim

  6. #6
    indeed a good one to cull,perfect in fact. well done. I take much greater enjoyment of culling the 'right' beasts than the best ones like big 6 pointers. when I shoot a nice head, I enjoy it for a few minutes, then I feel bad about it for ages- compared to a good cull beast, I continuously pat myself on the back for making the 'right call'.

  7. #7
    Well done Joe, another very good cull buck and nicely shot as well.
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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by buckup View Post
    Good animal to take, well done.

    I shot one last ear with a similar old injury, probably caught in a fence wire. Strangely, although his walking was stiff and there was some lameness and muscle wastage, the antlers were good and even, a six pointer. Any ideas why some develop uneven antler growth, while others continue with good even antlers? Could it be the length of time since the leg damage, i.e. longer time = more deformation of antler, or perhaps the opposite? Open to suggestions.

    Mark
    Could it be anything to do with the time of year when the animal sustains the injury? Or the age at which the animal sustains the injury? Just guesses...

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by buckup View Post
    Good animal to take, well done.

    I shot one last ear with a similar old injury, probably caught in a fence wire. Strangely, although his walking was stiff and there was some lameness and muscle wastage, the antlers were good and even, a six pointer. Any ideas why some develop uneven antler growth, while others continue with good even antlers? Could it be the length of time since the leg damage, i.e. longer time = more deformation of antler, or perhaps the opposite? Open to suggestions.

    Mark
    I would imagine when the injury has occurred, has a lot to do with it, in your case the injury i am guessing would have happened after his antlers had finished growing and who knows what his head would have been like the following year.
    If an injury happens in conjunction with growing a new set of antler and the body needs to repair the injury and grow antlers at the same time, then it will take a lot out a beast and the antlers suffer, although the malformation continues to appear year after year, even after the injury has long healed, which needs somebody more informed than me to explain why, if anybody knows the answer would like to hear it.

    Joelewis055,
    Cracking trophy to take for your first roe, well done, hopefully first of many.

    Moose

  10. #10
    Well done pal good cull buck.

    ATB Andy

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