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Thread: Hi

  1. #1

    Hi

    Hello all , as my username says , I live in a small town in west central Alberta and have hunted the western provinces for 37 years . I have modest collection of firearms but have used a large amount of calibers over the years . Originally , I'm an englishman (lived at enfield lock , maybe thats where I got the gun bug ) but immigrated here many years ago. Hunting in the u.k. has always interested me and from the good advice and well written articles I've read so far on this site I'm sure to learn a thing or two. Thanks and good hunting

  2. #2
    Hi Alberta boy,
    another relatively new boy to this site, I concour with your observation. This site is a valuable source of information supported by vast number of experienced fellow shooters who are willing and eager to assist in any query, welcome.
    regards m

  3. #3
    Welcome to SD guys. Alberta boy do you have many wolves around you?

  4. #4
    Welcome to the site,

    John
    A clever man knows his strengths, a wise man knows his weaknesses

  5. #5
    Thanks all , hi cougar , yes we do . The wolf population in alberta and to the west of me is very high these last few years . According to the fish & wildlife ( our provincial conservation administration ) its due to 2 to 3 mild winters in a row and an abundance of game ; moose , elk , deer . Actually , all our predator populations are doing well . Our grizzly numbers are stable but their biggest problem is human encroachment and thats going to be a difficult one to deal with , there hasn't been a hunting season for griz for quite a few years now but the population is still the same.
    The area I hunt ( ironically called wolf creek ) has 3 large packs , and we see them almost daily. There is no limit to the number of wolves you can take but only during the general season of the particular wildlife management unit . I don't shoot them myself , I get more enjoyment out of just watching them but my family members & friends do and thats ok to

  6. #6
    Thats quite a relaxed approach to wolves. I'm more use to my American friends in the lower 48 wanting every wolf destroyed and they all try to tell me that the wolves they have now after the reintroduction in 1995 are not the same as the one's they had before, that they are Canadian grey wolves!? Which in one way is true as those first wolves were trapped and brought in from Canada but to me a grey wolf is a grey wolf, how did they stop them crossing the border between Canada and Idaho, Washington and through the Rocky's in the first place!? Are they the same animal or different?

  7. #7
    Hey Cougar , sorry for the late response , the 8 hour time difference makes it hard to post a quick reply.
    You're right about the different attitude toward predators in canada.I've heard the same thing from friends in montana. I'm not a biologist but I doubt if there is much difference between the two. Wolves don't care about international borders and have moved back and forth since before we came here. While I understand the need to protect livestock ( I've done it myself ) wholesale irradication of a species is deplorable . In the late 70's & early 80's the alberta government sent grizzlies to montana to help them rebuild their bear populations . There was an outcry from some ranchers in the affected areas about possible predations by the bears and more than a few publicly stated they would shoot any grizzlies on sight ; long story short , most of the bears were killed within a few years and alberta conservation stopped sending bears.Fortunately , attitudes have begun to change towards large carnivores in the north-western states and hopefully these incidents wont happen as often as they used to .
    We do hear alot from hunters south of the border about the concerns they have about wolf predation on game populations . Some are in favor of taking the wolves out altogether but the majority of american hunters I've known share the same mind set as us, the wolves were here first and have more rights to the game than we do
    Take care

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by alberta boy View Post
    Hey Cougar , sorry for the late response , the 8 hour time difference makes it hard to post a quick reply.
    You're right about the different attitude toward predators in canada.I've heard the same thing from friends in montana. I'm not a biologist but I doubt if there is much difference between the two. Wolves don't care about international borders and have moved back and forth since before we came here. While I understand the need to protect livestock ( I've done it myself ) wholesale irradication of a species is deplorable . In the late 70's & early 80's the alberta government sent grizzlies to montana to help them rebuild their bear populations . There was an outcry from some ranchers in the affected areas about possible predations by the bears and more than a few publicly stated they would shoot any grizzlies on sight ; long story short , most of the bears were killed within a few years and alberta conservation stopped sending bears.Fortunately , attitudes have begun to change towards large carnivores in the north-western states and hopefully these incidents wont happen as often as they used to .
    We do hear alot from hunters south of the border about the concerns they have about wolf predation on game populations . Some are in favor of taking the wolves out altogether but the majority of american hunters I've known share the same mind set as us, the wolves were here first and have more rights to the game than we do
    Take care
    [the wolves were here first and have more right to the game than we do ] i like your style well said sir and welcome aboard

  9. #9
    Thanks dfoxxer , I'm glad that I found this site. There are seems to be a lot of experience and common sense here , not that easy to find these days

  10. #10

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